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The origins of Trader Joe's and why Americans don't drink more wine
NapaNews ^ | February 26, 2004 | PAUL FRANSON

Posted on 03/04/2004 11:47:11 AM PST by Stone Mountain

The origins of Trader Joe's and why Americans don't drink more wine

By PAUL FRANSON Register Correspondent

At the recent Unified Wine and Grape Symposium in Sacramento, some of us had the pleasure of meeting the real Trader Joe and hearing how he started the cultish chain.

To celebrate its 30th Anniversary, the California Association of Winegrape Growers invited Joe Coloumbe to address at its annual meeting.

Telling a tale worthy of PBS's "Nova," he enthralled the audience about why the Little Ice Age kept Americans from drinking wine, how the breakdown of an international monetary agreement affects the wine business -- and how he started the chain of quirky gourmet stores that upended the demand for California wine.

Why America is a land of beer and booze

He started by explaining why America isn't a wine-drinking country. In short, it's because the Little Ice Age of 1450 to 1850 turned our mostly Northeastern forebears from wine into beer and booze drinkers.

About 600 years ago, the climate in the Northern Hemisphere plummeted for 50 years, and Northern Europe stayed uncharacteristically cold until the middle of the 19th century.

This Little Ice Age replaced the Medieval Warming that preceded it, a time when vineyards grew across northern Europe and even in Iceland and Greenland.

In the 13th Century, French vintners complained that English wine flooded their shores and undercut their prices.

With the cooling climate, however, these vineyards retreated south, and northerners had to satisfy their need for alcohol with grain-based beverages, namely beer.

Of course, with cold temperatures, the wheat crop also failed, so laws were passed prohibiting its use in beer, forcing brewers to use tougher grains such as barley. Germans brewers still cite these old laws in proclaiming the "purity" of their beer made only from barley.

The Czechs learned to add hops to preserve the beer, and the member of the Cannabaceae family added a certain appeal. The public soon developed a taste for this slightly bitter brew.

As technology advanced, scientists learned to boil beer to extract its alcohol, making whisky and other alcoholic beverages possible.

The result: Northern Europeans drank beer and hard liquor, not wine. And since the United States was populated mostly by northeastern Europeans, we became a nation of beer and spirits drinkers, a tradition that still exists. More than 80 percent of the wine consumed in America is drunk by little more than 10 percent of the population.

A warming climate

Joe Coloumbe's ancestors came from Normandy to Quebec in 1665 to escape the cold and were surprised to find that area even colder. Their ancestors eventually made their way to warmed climates; Coloumbe lives in Southern California.

Generally, however, the climate has been getting warmer since the 19th Century. Many blame it on greenhouse gasses, but it should be noted that a similar situation existed 1,000 years ago and natural climatic cycles have existed for millennia. "I believe we're returning to the climate of the late Middle Ages," says Coloumbe.

He notes that with the warmer weather, vineyards in the Northern Hemisphere are sneaking north once again.

Last year was the first when the growing group of vine growers in England didn't have to add sugar to their juice and long-abandoned parts of Northern France are being replanted to vines as they were when the Yonne Valley near Chablis was the primary supplier of wine to Paris.

Closer to home, parts of North America where vitis vinifera grapes were untenable are now flourishing, including Virginia, the North Folk of Long Island and even parts of Canada. Coloumbe even sees a great future for vines on the south-facing shores of Lake Huron.

That climate change has other implications for the wine business.

Coloumbe forecasts that premium wine production will shift to latitudes as high as 50 degrees as locations closer to the Equator become warmer. The Bay Area lies at about 30 degrees, by the way, as are Santiago, Chile and the wine regions of Australia, Argentina and South Africa.

Maybe California wine companies that have invested in Washington are just thinking ahead.

Coloumbe notes that there's little land mass at higher latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere, however, only New Zealand's South Island, Tasmania and Argentina.

He envisions an increasing vinous future for the latter nation's lower reaches. "Argentina has a long tradition of making wine, most not very good, but that's changing."

A bright spot for California growers and winemakers

The second part of Trade Joe's talk concerned why currency rates fluctuate so widely, and in the interest of space, he says that the weak dollar is the best thing that could happen to American wineries.

He notes that the Euro has risen from 87 cents to the dollar to today's $1.30, and he thinks it will hit $1.40. That makes U.S. wine cheaper overseas -- and imports pricier to American consumers.

Likewise, the Australian dollar was at 50 when that nation's imports started flooding our markets. It's now at almost 80 cents. "The Australian dollar was at $1.25 in 1975," he notes. "If it goes to $1.25 again, you can forget about Yellowtail," the fastest growing Australian wine import.

And though the U.S. dollar is weak, he notes that the Argentine peso is even weaker. "Today, Argentina is the cheapest place in the world to grow wine."

Serving the over-educated, underpaid of society

Finally, Coloumbe talked about how he started Trader Joe's.

In 1966, he owned a chain of convenience stores called Pronto Market, but he could see that those businesses were becoming commodities. "I realized I had to change."

In searching for a new business model, Coloumbe discovered a prime customer target: the relatively small group of people with college degrees.

Thanks to the GI Bill, it was growing very fast, and he discovered a very strong relationship between years of education and alcoholic consumption. "It was as perfect a correlation as found in market research," he notes.

Attempting to exploit this group, Coloumbe outfitted a Pronto store with the "world's largest selection of alcoholic beverages."

In those days, California had "fair trade," i.e., manufacturers could fix retail prices. "We had 100 Bourbons, 50 Scotches and the world's largest assortment of California wines." He claims to be the first to give space to brands like Mayacamas, Schramsberg, Souverain and Mirassou in Southern California.

Eventually, Coloumbe found a loophole in the fair trade laws. He acquired an old license so he could also act as a wholesaler and developed a private label program, the precursor of today's Charles Shaw wine, better known as Two Buck Chuck.

Over time, he realized that his stores especially appealed to the over-educated and underpaid, notably teachers, classical musicians, museum curators and journalists. "That group now includes starving Silicon Valley engineers," he jokes. "It became our sacred mission to serve these customers."

It was a winning strategy, especially since the targeted customers has influence out of proportion with their salaries, and love to share their discoveries with others of the same ilk.

He adds, "We built Trader Joe's on wine first, then food. I tasted 100,000 wines, and most weren't wonderful. They were submitted to us by desperate vintners."

Joe Coloumbe left the company 15 years ago, but he notes that Charles Shaw wine is a return to the company's roots. "Is Two Buck Chuck as good as our private label wine of the '70s?" he asks rhetorically. "Eight million cases later, who's going to argue?"

He concluded by saying, "I look forward to trying Carlos T. Shaw from Argentina."


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: agriculture; climate; climatechange; culture; globalwarming; godsgravesglyphs; littleiceage; middleages; traderjoes; vineyards; vintners; warming; weather; weatherchange; wine

1 posted on 03/04/2004 11:47:12 AM PST by Stone Mountain
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To: Stone Mountain
Two Buck Chuck is one of the best wines I have ever had. They did a tasting on one of the morning shows a few months back. Two Buck Chuck vs some pretty high dollar stuff. 2 of the 3 wine tasters (professionals!) picked Two Buck Chuck as the best of the bunch!
2 posted on 03/04/2004 11:49:27 AM PST by Phantom Lord (Distributor of Pain, Your Loss Becomes My Gain)
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To: Phantom Lord
Two Buck Chuck is one of the best wines I have ever had.

I totally agree - you won't find a better wine for under $20 anywhere... Have you tried the new Two Buck Chuck Beaujolais? Also very good, although the Merlot is my favorite...
3 posted on 03/04/2004 11:52:20 AM PST by Stone Mountain
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To: Stone Mountain
I remember the early Trader Joe's in Los Angeles when I was in graduate school and law school, they had amazing bargains on wines that hadn't sold (sometimes 'cause they were bad, sometimes 'cause of overproduction or other reasons unrelated to quality), and drank literally hundreds of cases of excellent wines at prices around $1 a bottle. I remember his private label stuff then, too, and it was decent, very decent. On the other hand, I was recently given some Two Buck Chuck and found it truly excreble.
4 posted on 03/04/2004 11:56:21 AM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: Stone Mountain
I totally agree - you won't find a better wine for under $20 anywhere... Have you tried the new Two Buck Chuck Beaujolais? Also very good, although the Merlot is my favorite...

You're right. I can't drink their Cabernet or Chardonnay, but at $2 a pop their Merlot is amazing.

5 posted on 03/04/2004 11:58:16 AM PST by DentsRun
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To: Stone Mountain
"I believe we're returning to the climate of the late Middle Ages,"

In the absence of any reliable proof of GW I'll believe this too.

6 posted on 03/04/2004 11:59:40 AM PST by Semper Paratus
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To: Stone Mountain
There's another reason Trader Joe's does so well (beyond the cheap wine). Far from the sullen, indifferent and just plain dumb clerks you encounter in so many stores, Trader Joe's people are friendly and intelligent.
7 posted on 03/04/2004 12:01:10 PM PST by DentsRun
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To: Stone Mountain
There has only been one Merlot worth drinking produced in California in the past 25 years: the 1985 Matanzas Creek. An exceptional wine, not yet fully mature in magnums, it is reminiscent of a Cheval Blanc in a good year.
8 posted on 03/04/2004 12:02:16 PM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: CatoRenasci
we have a Trader Joe's in town (Arlington, Mass.), but it's mostly health, eccentric and exotic food, not a wine store. Is Trader Joe's stock traded publicly?
9 posted on 03/04/2004 12:05:07 PM PST by cloud8
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To: Phantom Lord
"...wine tasters (professionals!)"

Did they have a lisp?

10 posted on 03/04/2004 12:07:28 PM PST by nobody_knows (<a href="http://http://www.michaelmoore.com/" target="_blank">moral coward)
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Comment #11 Removed by Moderator

To: CatoRenasci
There has only been one Merlot worth drinking produced in California in the past 25 years...

Yikes! You're out of my league. (Definitely not serving wine when you come over for dinner.)

12 posted on 03/04/2004 12:11:39 PM PST by PBRSTREETGANG
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To: Stone Mountain
I used to love Trader Joe's before it expanded outside of Southern California.
13 posted on 03/04/2004 12:12:08 PM PST by BunnySlippers (Help Bring Colly-fornia Back ...)
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To: notorious vrc
I love my Trader Joe's...cheap gourmet and natural foods with a smile!!!
14 posted on 03/04/2004 12:12:18 PM PST by Katya
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To: nobody_knows
Did they have a lisp?

What are you inthinuating?

15 posted on 03/04/2004 12:13:45 PM PST by AmishDude
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To: Stone Mountain
Count me as the 10% of the population that drinks wine. I find this hard to believe only 10% of Americans are wine drinkers. ALL of my girlfriends and many of the women in my family drink wine almost exclusively.
16 posted on 03/04/2004 12:16:38 PM PST by FeliciaCat (Life is to short for ugly shoes.)
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To: CatoRenasci
I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks the Cali Merlots are unpalatable... ;)
17 posted on 03/04/2004 12:17:41 PM PST by BossLady
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To: Stone Mountain
Trader Joes is my neighborhood market. Fortunately there is a fresh vegatble store almost next door to it. If I could get a good butcher shop to open close I would have everything in one place.

TJ's also has some of the best quality/prices on nutritional supplements. They buy in MASSIVE quantity from high quality manufacturers. And they honestly do pass the savings along to their customers. People in the supplement/health food store talk derisively of TJ, but they refuse to meet their prices.

I highly reccomend their "VERY GREEN" product if you do green foods.

18 posted on 03/04/2004 12:17:50 PM PST by Khurkris (Ranger On...)
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To: Stone Mountain
Great store and very good wine selections; we do about 1/2 of our grocery shopping and 100% of our wine shopping there. I will have to disagree with the Charles Shaw (2 buck chuck)analysis, IMHO it is good but it is very basic.
19 posted on 03/04/2004 12:19:24 PM PST by SF Republican
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To: Stone Mountain
You wildly exaggerate the quality of 2buck. The red is ok, the white sucks. Neither comes close to other inexpensive wines from Chile for example. Try Marcus James Merlot if you want to taste a really good, inexpensive wine.

I love TJ and find they have great prices on wine but don't drink the 2buck (3buck now.) I rarely pay more than $6 for a bottle of wine.

Living in Chicago I can find inexpensive wine in many places as well as TJ. What I really like there is the bread now that is truly great.
20 posted on 03/04/2004 12:23:15 PM PST by justshutupandtakeit (America's Enemies foreign and domestic agree: Bush must be destroyed.)
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To: FeliciaCat
I think my wine drinking makes up for the other 90%.

I like to experiment, but for day to day, I have a large (14oz) glass of Carlo Rossi Chianti. It's not that great, but you can't beat it for 9.99 a gallon.
21 posted on 03/04/2004 12:28:29 PM PST by sandpit
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To: FeliciaCat
I find this hard to believe only 10% of Americans are wine drinkers.

That's not what was said.

22 posted on 03/04/2004 12:29:20 PM PST by Stentor
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To: CatoRenasci
Messed up your spelling, too...(execrable)
23 posted on 03/04/2004 12:32:22 PM PST by Old Professer
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To: Stentor
"More than 80 percent of the wine consumed in America is drunk by little more than 10 percent of the population."

?
24 posted on 03/04/2004 12:35:51 PM PST by FeliciaCat (Life is to short for ugly shoes.)
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To: Temple Owl
ping
25 posted on 03/04/2004 12:43:33 PM PST by Tribune7 (Vote Toomey April 27)
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To: FeliciaCat
"More than 80 percent of the wine consumed in America is drunk by little more than 10 percent of the population." Happy to say, I'm doing my part.
26 posted on 03/04/2004 12:47:57 PM PST by bondjamesbond (John Kerry is nothing more than Ted Kennedy without a dead girl in the car.)
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To: Phantom Lord
I love Two Buch Chuck! It just proves that price is not always an indicator of how good a wine will be.

27 posted on 03/04/2004 12:50:17 PM PST by Bella_Bru
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To: Old Professer; BossLady
Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa! Or, as we say nowadays, sorry 'bout that. The nimble fingers weren't so nimble and the M-1 calibrated eyeballs had not been properly adjusted for operator headspace.

But, the point remains nonetheless: California Merlot is almost uniformly flat, lacking in structure and tanin, and sweet to the point of being as cloying as wines like Almaden or Paul Masson 'burgundy' or 'claret' were 40-50 years ago before the varietal revolution. Oh, they have a decent enough nose, but they're devoid of character (thank you San Joaquin Valley varietals programs of the '70s and '80s), have a short entry, blandly flat middle palate, and short to nonexistent finish. When not sweet, sharply acidic where they should be tannic. Faugh!

28 posted on 03/04/2004 1:38:49 PM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: PBRSTREETGANG
Well, I do have a bit of an unfair advantage over the average wine drinker: my great uncles were all oenologists and California winemakers from around the turn of the 20th century. My grandfather, (whose education was classical rather than scientific and who was on the business side) was a connoisseur whose cellar was full of first quality Burgundy, Bordeaux, Piedmontese and Tuscan wines as well as California wines, from about 1900 through 1961 (limited buying after the 55's). I was lucky enough to pull a lot of corks as a youth with some very knowledgeable men (and women), including the owners and winemakers at many California wineries of the '50s and '60s, and learn from their discussions.

P.S. My absolute favorite underappreciated wine: Inglenook Charbono. I don't think it's made any longer, but the 1941 was as good as any of the '41 Cabernet Sauvignons, and that's sayign something. The '66 and '68 were legendary, the '70 was magnificent, and the '76 is probably just ready to drink. It's a pity no one I know has a bottle anymore.

I remember going into a Trader Joe's in Los Angeles in 1978 and finding three cases of '70 Inglenook Charbono for $20 a case. Wonderful wine!

29 posted on 03/04/2004 1:56:32 PM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: Phantom Lord
There will always be good cheap wine. If you pay more than 25$ for a bottle, you're not doing your homework---essentially you're paying for a label.
30 posted on 03/04/2004 2:06:20 PM PST by stands2reason
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Comment #31 Removed by Moderator

To: FeliciaCat
I actually prefer the taste of good beer to wine, though I rarely drink either. (Wine gives me heartburn, beer the burps.) I drink girly mixed drinks with liqueurs. My fave -- 1 1/2 - 2 shots butterscotch schnapps, 1/2 shot light rum, fill with chilled coffee and cream on the rocks.
Yummy!
32 posted on 03/04/2004 2:12:09 PM PST by stands2reason
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To: Stone Mountain
Distillation of spirits for whiskey and its Celtic precursor is widely acknowledged to have begun in ancient times, not following some climatic change in the 1400s as the article states. In fact a written record from the middle of that century details the delivery of 1500 bottles of aquavitae (whiskey) to a certain Monk.

Touted for its varied medicinal uses, whisky was even said to cure lisping. One can assume from this that were professional wine tasters around even then. I have tested this anti-lisping theory my self for 35 years and will, after a bit more study, be ready to pronounce it true.

33 posted on 03/04/2004 2:22:43 PM PST by wtc911 (Roe v. Wade will end only if proof of a "gay" gene is found, to our national shame.)
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To: Phantom Lord
I just got a bottle of the two buck Chuck and it's very good. I am more of a beer drinker but beer is one of the worst things to drink due to it's glycerin index (sugar) which turns right to fat. Drinking More wine and booze now :-)
34 posted on 03/04/2004 2:35:05 PM PST by Moleman
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To: AnnaZ; feinswinesuksass
The debate rages...heheh.
35 posted on 03/04/2004 3:01:02 PM PST by Bob J (www.freerepublic.net www.radiofreerepublic.com...check them out!)
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To: CatoRenasci
Agreed! I find many Cali wines these days terribly acidic tasting primarily due to the high amount of alkaloids in the soil. Forget varnish remover, use one of these wines! Blech!

Have you given the Coppola wines a whirl? I received the 1998 Diamond Series Claret and Merlot as a gift and the 2000 Director's Series Chardonnay and Merlot as gifts. As a general rule, I find all of them to have a strong oaky flavor which seems to overpower the fruit notes.

36 posted on 03/04/2004 3:18:37 PM PST by BossLady
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To: CatoRenasci
Cato,
You sound like you got introduced to wine at seminary. In vino veritas.
37 posted on 03/04/2004 3:39:51 PM PST by TEXASPROUD
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To: stands2reason
<> Exactly. The price of a specific wine is mostly due to the number of units they can produce. A harvest of enough grapes that will produce 1,000,000 cases of wine will be a product much cheeper than a wine that only 10,000 cases can be produced.
38 posted on 03/04/2004 5:52:13 PM PST by tiggs ( Are you a pacifist? No Sir! I'm a coward.)
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To: BossLady
The Coppola "diamond series" wines are well-made and usually decent, a cut above what used to be called "sound commercial wine" in the trade. I agree that they seem to be overly oaky, but I'm not sure why since they are usually bought-in wines. Over-oaky can come from new barrels, and, especially from American oak rather than Nevers or Limousine oak. I can't imagine Coppola putting bought-in wines in his expensive French oak barrels, unless he uses the wines to season the barrels before he puts serious wine in them. I'll have to ask my cousin who has a bottling operation and has bottled for Coppola. Back around '96 I actually watched some of that wine being bottled.

I have enjoyed the Claret in a couple of vintages. I wouldn't know about the Merlot. IIRC, I was not thrilled with the Chardonnay, the oak reminded me of cardboard. Often they are not made from grapes on the estate, or even with his own wine (when it says "vinted and bottled by" you know the named producer did not make the wine, he bought it and finished it, perhaps blending it.

39 posted on 03/04/2004 7:43:32 PM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: TEXASPROUD
You sound like you got introduced to wine at seminary.

That would have been difficult, as I never attended seminary. Actually, it was just sitting with my great uncles and grandfather and their friends, drinking and discussing wines of various degrees of seriousness. Also going visiting with my grandfather (and sometimes one or more great uncles) to various wineries to have luncheon or dinner with the owners or winemakers. Everyone would bring interesting old wines, and interesting old wines would come out of the winery's vaults.

My grandfather had a fairly large stock of '28 and '29 first and second growth Bordeaux, which were very popular as benchmark wines to have alongside old California wines. The '35s and '37's were good, the '41s probably the best vintage in California in the 20th century (but there were only a handful of ageworthy cabernet sauvignons then: BV reserve, Inglenook cask, Simi reserve, Martin Ray, Louis Martini Special Selection, but the BV and Inglenook cask are -- for me -- the greatest California cabs I have ever drunk. Although having the complexity of age, they still had significant fruit, perfect structure and plenty of tannin left when I drank them in 1960, in 1966, in 1970 and in 1978.) The '47s were excellent, as were some '55s and '57s. In the '60s, '66 and '68 were the oustanding years, and 1970 was a close runner up to 1941.

40 posted on 03/04/2004 7:57:33 PM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: Stone Mountain
Joe Coloumbe's ancestors came from Normandy to Quebec in 1665 to escape the cold and were surprised to find that area even colder. Their ancestors eventually made their way to warmed climates; Coloumbe lives in Southern California.

I think it should say, "Their descendants eventually made their way to warmed climates; Coloumbe lives in Southern California."

41 posted on 03/04/2004 8:52:14 PM PST by ValerieUSA
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To: Stone Mountain
Why wine? When u can cry in your beer? Besides suicide is quicker with liquer. Ask ozzy or black sabbath
42 posted on 03/04/2004 8:55:11 PM PST by KingNo155
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To: CatoRenasci
"vinted and bottled by"

I understand that the amount could as much as 25% not from the vinter. Sad!

European standards are much higher in this regard.

I would be interested in hearing info from your cousin ;)

43 posted on 03/05/2004 1:59:04 PM PST by BossLady
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To: BossLady
Let's see, if memory serves (it's been a while since I looked at the regulations), in Califoria, wines can be labelled:

"grown, produced, and bottled by" which means the winery had to grow all (or almost all, I think there's a 5% leeway) of the grapes, had to crush the grapes, make the wine, age and blend it, and bottled it. In other words, the winery performed the entire process.

"produced and bottled by" which means that the winery crushed the grapes, made the wine, aged, blended and bottled it. In this situation, the winery may or may not have grown some or most of the grapes, and bought some, most or all of the grapes from other growers. This is probably the most common designation on quality wines.

Below that are three designations you see, but which don't mean much, if anything, legally:

"made and bottled by" which doesn't mean the winery made the wine, or very much of it. The wine was probably purchased from another winery (it could have been surplus, or not up to the other winery's standards, or just not needed for in the blends). By custom, this designation means that the winemaker at the winery whose lable it's under did something to the wine, perhaps blended it.

"vinted and bottled by means just about the same as "made and bottled by" but customarily means the winery did a little (how little?? who knows, it's anyone's guess) less than for "made and bottled by". These are entirely purchased in wines that are blended and finished for sale by the winery or negociant. This is commonly seen on negociant wines sold under a wine merchant's lable, rather than an actually winery's lable.

"cellard and bottled by" legally doesn't mean much less that the "made and bottled by" or "vinted and bottled by", but by custom this reflects the least work by the winery or negociant. It is very common on negociant wines.

Very often, some winerys do not grow enough grapes to meet their needs, or they don't like the quality of their own grapes in a given year or given vineyard, and so they buy grapes from other growers. Sometimes this is done on long term contract, other times on the spot market.

Likewise with freshly made wines. Some wineries will have more than they need (or have room to cellar and age) or particular wines (e.g. a winery that uses merlot to blend with cabernet might have more merlot than it wants for blending, but doesn't want to bottle a varietal merlot), and others will have wines that are perfectly decent ("sound commercial wine" in the trade) but are not up to the winery's standards. Other wineries will need wines of varying quality for their blends or to fill out their lines. And, it bountiful years, there's more wine than anyone wants, sometimes of excellent quanity. To keep prices up, a lot of this wine is sold off to merchants who will act a negociants and create 'house' blends for sale.

44 posted on 03/07/2004 7:14:52 PM PST by CatoRenasci (Ceterum Censeo [Gallia][Germania][Arabia] Esse Delendam --- Select One or More as needed)
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To: Stone Mountain
Wow! I was just there today after not shopping there for a while. They have the best kippers: they taste better than the ones in the grocery store, the cans are bigger, and they're cheaper. :-)
45 posted on 03/07/2004 7:36:47 PM PST by BlessedBeGod
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‘Two-Buck Chuck’ Wins Wine Competition
North County Times/The Californian | Friday, June 29, 2007
Bradley J. Fikes - Staff Writer
Posted on 06/30/2007 5:05:16 PM EDT by DogByte6RER
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1858923/posts


46 posted on 12/09/2007 10:56:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Monday, December 10, 2007____________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Glyphs
Medieval history topic:
the Little Ice Age of 1450 to 1850 turned our mostly Northeastern forebears from wine into beer and booze drinkers
Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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47 posted on 12/09/2007 10:57:51 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Monday, December 10, 2007____________________https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Phantom Lord

Two Buck Chuck is one of the best wines I have ever had.”

My taste in wine always ran to Maddog and Wild Irish Rose, but then I drank for effect.
I wasn’t bad enough for Thunderbird(sorry Mozilla).


48 posted on 12/09/2007 11:06:01 PM PST by philetus (Keep doing what you always do and you'll keep getting what you always get.)
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To: nnn0jeh

ping


49 posted on 12/09/2007 11:12:15 PM PST by kalee ( No burka for me...EVER.)
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