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To: 2Jedismom
This region is very close to Chernobyl, in fact, right in the path of the fallout from the world's worst nuclear disaster. The mushrooms from around there are huge too, and best of all, they even glow in the dark so you can find them at night.
20 posted on 03/25/2004 5:52:57 AM PST by Bon mots
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To: Bon mots

The village of "Mir" (peace) is just to the left of the letter "B" in "Belarus" on this map. Chernobyl is approximately where the letter "E" is in the word "Ukraine" at the bottom of the map.

The cloud of radioactivity blew Northwest out of Chernobyl and was first detected in Scandinavia. Mir was right in the path.

Of course, this has nothing to do with large eggs or mushrooms from the region.

On this map, you can see the path to Scandinavia (Sweden) from Northern Ukraine.

Fallout in Sweden Outside the former USSR, radioactive material was first detected in Sweden on April 28, 1986, two days after the accident. On two occasions, April 26-30 and May 8-10, the wind direction was towards the Nordic countries. The heaviest fallout occurred in some regions of middle and north Sweden on the first occasion. It was mainly obtained by wet-deposition, washed out with rain or snow from the radioactive plume. The deposition of 137Cs in these regions, mainly in the northern part of Sweden, was estimated to a range from 10 to >80 kBq/m2, with a maximum in Gävle commune with more than 200 kBq/m2 (Figure 1).

In other regions of Sweden, mainly in the southern part, where only dry-depositions occurred, the range was 0.2 to 5 kBq/m2 of 137Cs. The total fallout of 137Cs in Sweden was estimated to be 4.25 PBq or about 5 % of that released from Chernobyl, with a mean deposition in Sweden of 10 kBq m-2. About 70 % of the total fallout in Sweden was within wet-deposition. Single fuel fragments or hot particles found in Sweden, with a size of several micrometers, contained a total activity of up to 1 kBq each.

22 posted on 03/25/2004 6:14:41 AM PST by Bon mots
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To: Bon mots
Of all countries, Belarus was affected the most by the Chernobyl catastrophe: 70 percent of all released radioactive substances from Chernobyl fell on its territory. The Belarus border is only 10 km north of the Chernobyl reactor. Practically the whole territory was heavily contaminated by radionuclides. More than 1.8 million people are still living in heavy polluted territories. The radiation dose they receive on average amounts to 15 mSv (milliSievert) a year.1 That is more than forty times the most recent ICRP radiation limit (1991) which is: 0.4 mSv/yr! The parliament declared the entire country a zone of ecological calamity. Around Gomel, close to Chernobyl, and also in regions within a distance of 140 km, there are very high radiation values. Less areas in Ukraine and Russia were heavily contaminated than in Belarus. Except in the evacuation zone around Chernobyl, agriculture goes on as before, even in heavily polluted regions. The private food production, which provides more than fifty percent of total food consumed, is not controlled at all. People in contaminated regions have a 30 percent higher rate of illness than elsewhere. 2 Ten years after Chernobyl, air, water and food contain still too high levels of cesium, strontium, plutonium and americium. Food items, especially milk, meat and mushrooms have accumulated high quantities of these four radioactive substances, far above Western radiation levels. In some areas, thyroid cancers among children have increased 200-fold since 1986.3
23 posted on 03/25/2004 6:27:37 AM PST by Bon mots
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