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A Kerry Landslide?
Washington Monthly ^ | 4/6/04 | Todd

Posted on 05/05/2004 5:46:10 AM PDT by pabianice

Why the next election won't be close.

Over the last year, most political TV shows handicapping the upcoming presidential election have repeated the refrain that the race will be extremely tight. Last month, CNN's astute commentator Jeff Greenfield hosted an entire segment on how easily this election could turn out like 2000, with President Bush and Sen. John Kerry splitting victories in the popular vote and the electoral college. Greenfield even threw out the possibility of an electoral college split of 269-269, brought about by a shift of just two swing states that went for Bush last time, New Hampshire, and West Virginia. He ended his feature with the conventional wisdom among Washington pundits: "We're assuming this election will stay incredibly close." Reporters covering the campaign echo this expectation, sprinkling their campaign dispatches with references to the "closely fought" electoral race and "tight election." The campaign staffs themselves have been saying for months that they anticipate that the race will go down to the wire. In late April, Republican party chairman Ed Gillespie told The New York Times that he expected a "very, very close" race. This winter, Democratic party chairman Terry McAuliffe urged Ralph Nader not to enter the race, fearing that the perpetual candidate could take precious votes away from Kerry in a race sure to be won by a hairline margin.

There are perfectly understandable reasons why we expect 2004 to be close. Everyone remembers the nail-biting 2000 recount. A vast number of books and magazine articles describe the degree to which we are a 50/50 nation and detail the precarious balance between red and blue states. And poll after poll show the two candidates oscillating within a few percentage points of one another. There are also institutional factors that drive the presumption that the race will be tight. The press wants to cover a competitive horse-race. And the last thing either campaign wants to do is give its supporters any reason to be complacent and stay home on election day.

But there's another possibility, one only now being floated by a few political operatives: 2004 could be a decisive victory for Kerry. The reason to think so is historical. Elections that feature a sitting president tend to be referendums on the incumbent--and in recent elections, the incumbent has either won or lost by large electoral margins. If you look at key indicators beyond the neck-and-neck support for the two candidates in the polls--such as high turnout in the early Democratic primaries and the likelihood of a high turnout in November--it seems improbable that Bush will win big. More likely, it's going to be Kerry in a rout.

Bush: the new Carter

In the last 25 years, there have been four elections which pitted an incumbent against a challenger--1980, 1984, 1992, and 1996. In all four, the victor won by a substantial margin in the electoral college. The circumstances of one election hold particular relevance for today: 1980. That year, the country was weathering both tough economic times (the era of "stagflation"--high inflation concurrent with a recession) and frightening foreign policy crises (the Iranian hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan). Indeed, this year Bush is looking unexpectedly like Carter. Though the two presidents differ substantially in personal style (one indecisive and immersed in details, the other resolute but disengaged), they are also curiously similar. Both are religious former Southern governors. Both initially won the presidency by tarring their opponents (Gerald Ford, Al Gore) with the shortcomings of their predecessors (Richard Nixon, Bill Clinton). Like Carter, Bush is vulnerable to being attacked as someone not up to the job of managing impending global crises.

Everyone expected the 1980 election to be very close. In fact, Reagan won with 50.8 percent of the popular vote to Carter's 41 percent (independent John Anderson won 6.6 percent)--which translated into an electoral avalanche of 489 to 49. The race was decided not so much on the public's nascent impressions of the challenger, but on their dissatisfaction with the incumbent.

Nor was Carter's sound defeat an aberration. Quite the opposite. Of the last five incumbent presidents booted from office--Bush I, Carter, Ford, Herbert Hoover, and William Howard Taft--only one was able to garner over 200 electoral votes, and three of these defeated incumbents didn't even cross the 100 electoral-vote threshold: --1992: 370 (Bill Clinton) to 168 (George H. W. Bush) --1980: 489 (Ronald Reagan) to 49 (Jimmy Carter) --1976: 297 (Jimmy Carter) to 240 (Gerald Ford) --1932: 472 (FDR) to 59 (Herbert Hoover) --1912: 435 (Woodrow Wilson) to 88 (TR) to 8 (Taft)

Poll sitting

Historically, when incumbents lose big, they do so for sound reasons: The public sees their policies as not working--or worse yet, as failures. That's certainly increasingly true of Bush today. From the chaos in Iraq to an uncomfortably soft economic recovery to the passage of an unpopular Medicare bill, the White House is having a harder and harder time putting a positive spin on the effects of the president's decisions.

And while Bush still retains a loyal base, he has provoked--both by his policies and his partisanship--an extremely strong reaction among Democrats. One indication is that turnout in this year's early Democratic primaries was way up. Nearly twice as many Democrats turned out for the 2004 Iowa caucuses as they had for those held in 2000. The turnout in New Hampshire for the Democratic primary was also extraordinarily high, up 29 percent from the previous turnout record set in 1992--the year Bush's father lost his reelection bid.

The Democrats' recent enthusiasm at the polls may in part be because this year's primary featured nine candidates, and Howard Dean's unusual campaign mobilized many new voters--both for and against him. However, the excitement in the Democratic race can't explain primary voter behavior on the other side of the aisle. Republican turnout in the New Hampshire primary was lower than in 2000, but that isn't surprising considering that Bush's nomination was never in question this year. A fairer way to gauge the eagerness of the president's base to rally behind him is to compare this GOP primary to the last one that featured an incumbent running for reelection with no real primary opposition: Bill Clinton in 1996. That year in New Hampshire, 76,874 Democrats cast ballots for Clinton. This year, 53,749 Republicans cast ballots for Bush. This is especially astonishing, considering that, in New Hampshire, there are more registered Republicans than Democrats.

The most obvious evidence cutting against the historical trend of elections featuring incumbents being won or lost by large margins is that opinion polls have consistently shown Bush and Kerry running neck and neck. But look carefully, and you'll find a couple of nuances in the most recent poll data that point to the potential for a big Kerry win. First, in polls that implicitly assume a higher turnout, Kerry performs better than he does in other polls. Most of the polls you hear about--and the ones that prognosticators trust the most--are surveys of "likely voters." Among the criteria pollsters typically use to identify likely voters is whether the subjects participated in the last election. These polls have proven more accurate in recent elections, like 2000, when voter turnout was relatively low--of the last nine presidential elections, only two showed lower turnout than 2000. But there are strong reasons to think that voters will turn out in larger numbers this year--especially among Democrats.

Four years ago, when the economy was strong, the country wasn't at war, and both presidential candidates ran as moderates, just 43 percent of adults told an early April Gallup poll that they had been thinking about the election "quite a lot." This April, when the issues seem much bigger and the differences between the candidates much starker, Gallup found that 61 percent of adults said they had been giving "quite a lot" of thought to the election.

So, presuming higher turnout, an arguably better predictor of election results would be polls of registered voters--both those who voted and those who stayed home in 2000. In an early April Gallup poll, Kerry trailed Bush 46 percent to 48 percent among likely voters, but led 48 percent to 46 percent among registered voters. Kerry's support had dropped incrementally in a late April Gallup poll, but he continued to garner higher support among registered voters than likely voters.

The second nuance to look at is what political consultant Chris Kofinis calls "the Bush bubble": the gap between the president's overall approval ratings and his approval ratings on specific policy areas. According to the most recent Washington Post/ABC News poll, Bush's approval rating now stands at 51 percent. That isn't bad, though it is noticeably below what the last two incumbents who won reelection had at this point in the election cycle: Reagan's approval was 54 percent and Clinton's was 56 percent. But even Bush's 51 percent may be softer than it looks. In the same poll, on seven of nine major policy issues--the economy, Iraq, Social Security, health insurance, taxes, jobs, the deficit--less than half of respondents said that they approved of the president's performance. In several cases, his approval was well below 50 percent. Only 45 percent approved of Bush's handling of Iraq; 44 percent of his performance on the economy; 34 percent of his performance on the deficit; and 33 percent of his stewardship of Social Security. Even on policy areas in which the president's approval is now relatively high--education and the war on terror--he is vulnerable to later substantive attacks by Kerry. For instance, he currently garners 51 percent approval on education, due largely to his role in passing a bold education measure; increasingly, however, educators and the public are alarmed about the effects of No Child Left Behind.

Kerry's challenge

Of course, the tight polling data does reflect a fundamental reality: For all the fallout from his policies, Bush still appeals to many Americans because of his seeming decisiveness, straight talk, and regular-guy charm--not qualities that John Kerry prominently displays. The historical pattern may strongly suggest that if Kerry wins, it will be by large margins--but that is hardly fated. It will only happen if Kerry successfully highlights Bush's failings while showing himself to be an appealing alternative. Otherwise, the senator could see himself losing an electoral rout, not winning in one. In fact, the second most likely outcome of this election is a Bush landslide. With just one exception, every president to win a second consecutive term has done so with a larger electoral margin than his initial victory. The least likely result this November is another close election.

Right now, the president is vulnerable. As The New Republic's Ryan Lizza argued in a recent New York Times editorial, undecided voters "know [the incumbent] well, and if they were going to vote for him, they would have already decided. Thus support for Mr. Bush should be seen more as a ceiling, while support for Mr. Kerry, the lesser-known challenger, is more like a floor."

That points to both an opportunity and a challenge for the Kerry campaign. Kerry needs to convince voters that he's up to the job--and that Bush isn't. If he can woo voters dissatisfied with Bush's policies, there's a potential--and historical precedent--for Kerry to win big.

Chuck Todd is the editor in chief of National Journal's Hotline.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; Philosophy; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: 2004; americaisdoomed
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What happens when you spend 8 years in college smoking dope.
1 posted on 05/05/2004 5:46:10 AM PDT by pabianice
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To: pabianice
The libs really are in denial, aren't they? To be staring oblivion in the face so early in the game . . .
2 posted on 05/05/2004 5:53:49 AM PDT by mywholebodyisaweapon
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To: pabianice
Dream on, authorman. A Kerry landslide is borderline impossible. Not one southern state will go for this elitist grandstander. In the end, I doubt too many mid-western states will either. He is simply a horrible candidate. No one in Ohio wants to hear about this dolt feeling obligated to attend Yale due to his 'life of privilege.'
3 posted on 05/05/2004 5:54:18 AM PDT by ilgipper
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To: pabianice
I quit reading after the lie about the high Democrat turnout in the Primaries, The fact is it was one of the worst turnouts
4 posted on 05/05/2004 5:54:39 AM PDT by MJY1288 (John Kerry Was a Blue Ribbon Finalist in the 1st. Annual V.V.A.W. Medals Toss in Wash. D.C. 1971)
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To: pabianice
A Kerry landslide is not only possible, it's very likely! The South will rise up and vote for this very liberal patrician candidate from Massachusetts in droves come November!

I also think the Pope will convert to Islam and the Red Sox will win the World Serious.
5 posted on 05/05/2004 5:56:50 AM PDT by You Dirty Rats (WE WILL WIN WITH W - Isara)
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To: pabianice
Obviously the author didn't bother listening to the news this last week about the Dimwits worried they need to give Kerry the boot.
6 posted on 05/05/2004 5:58:35 AM PDT by mtbopfuyn
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To: ilgipper
I've bookmarked this article with a note to e-mail the author in November, After Dubya's landslide, just to rub it in.
7 posted on 05/05/2004 6:00:27 AM PDT by alnick (Mrs. Heinz-Kerry's husband wants teh-rayz-ah your taxes.)
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To: pabianice

The author.

 

8 posted on 05/05/2004 6:00:29 AM PDT by Fintan (© 1950)
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To: pabianice
"But look carefully, and you'll find a couple of nuances in the most recent poll data that point to the potential for a big Kerry win."


How about the fact that Kerry's negatives are going up? He mentions the approvals of Clinton and Reagan but not the approval of Carter in 1980. How does it compare to Bush?
9 posted on 05/05/2004 6:00:39 AM PDT by KJacob
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To: MJY1288
I quit reading after the lie about the high Democrat turnout in the Primaries, The fact is it was one of the worst turnouts

That was my stopping point, too.

10 posted on 05/05/2004 6:01:57 AM PDT by meowmeow
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To: pabianice
So either:

Bush is Carter and Kerry is Reagan
Bush is Reagan and Kerry is Mondale
Bush is Bush I and Kerry is Dukakis
Bush is Bush I and Kerry is Clinton
Bush is Bush II and Kerry is Gore
Bush is Clinton and Kerry is Dole
Bush is Ford and Kerry is Carter
Bush is Nixon and Kerry is McGovern
Bush is FDR and Kerry is Dewey
Bush is Hoover and Kerry is FDR
Bush is McKinley and Kerry is Bryan
Bush is Lincoln and Kerry is McClellan
Bush is Jefferson and Kerry is Burr
Bush is Reuben Stoddard and Kerry is Clay Aiken
Bush is Nero and Kerry is Galba
Bush is Tiberius and Kerry is Asinius Gallus

Or vice-versa.
11 posted on 05/05/2004 6:03:12 AM PDT by VisualizeSmallerGovernment (Question Liberal Authority)
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To: pabianice
But there's another possibility, one only now being floated by a few political operatives: 2004 could be a decisive victory for Kerry.

But there's another possibility. Monkeys could fly out of my butt.

Maybe it is only "being floated by a few political operatives" because there are very few democRATs who can say it with a straight faact.

12 posted on 05/05/2004 6:03:31 AM PDT by Bubba_Leroy
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To: alnick
Boy I could come up with a long list of those I want to "rub it in" in November. Didn't we have double digit inflation and unemployment during Carter? How can anyone compare that to Bush's economy?
13 posted on 05/05/2004 6:05:52 AM PDT by KJacob
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To: KJacob
He mentions the approvals of Clinton and Reagan but not the approval of Carter in 1980. How does it compare to Bush?

According to Gallup, from May through September of 1980 (no data is available after mid-September until after the election), Carter's average approval was 35.5% and his average disapproval was 53.6%.

14 posted on 05/05/2004 6:05:52 AM PDT by BlackRazor
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To: KJacob
Didn't we have double digit inflation and unemployment during Carter? How can anyone compare that to Bush's economy?

Simple. You just redefine the "misery index".

15 posted on 05/05/2004 6:07:35 AM PDT by VisualizeSmallerGovernment (Question Liberal Authority)
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To: pabianice
Wishful thinking.
16 posted on 05/05/2004 6:07:44 AM PDT by Pox
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To: BlackRazor
"According to Gallup, from May through September of 1980 (no data is available after mid-September until after the election), Carter's average approval was 35.5% and his average disapproval was 53.6%."


So Bush's approval needs to drop a mere 16%? I understand the comparison now. By the way does Kerry have the charisma of Reagan? Just wondering.
17 posted on 05/05/2004 6:08:51 AM PDT by KJacob
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To: pabianice
What happens when you spend 8 years in college smoking dope.

You come up with gems like Bush = Carter O.o

18 posted on 05/05/2004 6:10:31 AM PDT by battousai (Islamic terrorists are like cancer... can you negotiate with Cancer?)
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To: pabianice
Wow, this guy is really trying to convince himself that Kerry is a great candidate.
19 posted on 05/05/2004 6:10:49 AM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: pabianice
I haven't laughed this hard in a while..I may need to tape my ribs.Thank heavens my coffee cup was empty!
20 posted on 05/05/2004 6:11:58 AM PDT by MEG33 (John Kerry's been AWOL for two decades on issues of National Security!)
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To: pabianice
Shall we look at history? Okay.

Since 1960, Candidates from the South or West have beaten those from the North.
since 1960, Northern Liberals have lost big.
Senators are seldom elected president.(only twice)

Kerry is a Northern (in fact NorthEastern) Liberal Senator running against a Southern sitting president.

Look a bit further--Kerry is a very wealthy elitist. Americans do not like to elect wealthy elitists.

So what do we have? A wealthy elitist northeastern Massachusetts liberal senator running against a moderately conservative southerner to whom most Americans can relate.

landslide for Kerry--yeah, right.
21 posted on 05/05/2004 6:14:20 AM PDT by fqued
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To: VisualizeSmallerGovernment
Simple. You just redefine the "misery index".

Another brilliant campaign item from the geniuses in KerryLand,that really worked well for him

Wishing does not make it so, Mr.Liberal columnist-man.

22 posted on 05/05/2004 6:15:11 AM PDT by Redcoat LI ("help to drive the left one into the insanity.")
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To: pabianice
Interesting thesis. The only thing he says that worries me is that Bush's current numbers -- generally in the mid-forties -- represent a ceiling, because Bush is a known commodity. I think he's wrong. Bush's numbers are depressed right now because so many voters persist in thinking that the economy is bad, but those voters cannot keep their heads in the sand forever. Sooner or later economic reality will set in. Still, I can't help but think it's a bit of a bad sign that the president isn't managing a slightly better showing than 46% or 47% in the RCP average.
23 posted on 05/05/2004 6:17:40 AM PDT by Bonaventure
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To: pabianice
Indeed, this year Bush is looking unexpectedly like Carter

ATTENTION ALL LIBERAL JOURNALISTS:

Your life's work of getting Bush out of office is so transparent that you are actually creating the opposite of what you are trying to accomplish. You might need to try masturbation or something more sincere.

Comparing Bush to Carter?

Carter: Higher taxes. 20% Inflation. Embarrassed military.

Clinton: Higher Taxes. Massive massive corruption widespread in Government and Business. The Oval Oval office effect. Loathed the military.

Bush: lower taxes, stronger military. See yall in 05.

24 posted on 05/05/2004 6:18:25 AM PDT by alrea (WEAPONS OF MASS CORRUPTION FOUND AT UN & at the NY Times...)
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To: You Dirty Rats
Okay
The next Pope might convert to Islam
But that's where I draw the line
25 posted on 05/05/2004 6:20:27 AM PDT by 1903A3
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To: VisualizeSmallerGovernment
I knew Asinius Gallus.

Asinius Gallus was a friend of mine.

John Kerry's no Asinius Gallus.

26 posted on 05/05/2004 6:20:37 AM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: pabianice
This guy is living in a fantasy world.
27 posted on 05/05/2004 6:23:59 AM PDT by Angelwood (FReepers are Everywhere! We Support Our Troops! (Hillary's Vast Rt Wg Conspiracy))
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To: Bubba_Leroy
But there's another possibility. Monkeys could fly out of my butt.

Forgot one other possibility.

The "presumptive candidate" won't be the candidate. Instead they wil nominate What's-her-face, Umm... you know, the woman that was married to Bubba... What was her name again?
28 posted on 05/05/2004 6:25:01 AM PDT by Rick.Donaldson
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To: You Dirty Rats
I resent that remark about the Red Sox.
29 posted on 05/05/2004 6:27:22 AM PDT by battlecry
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To: pabianice
While I do not dismiss the possibility that a Bush Kerry race could be tight in popular vote, I don't think the electoral college vote will be that close.

Given Kerry's gaffs, weak poll numbers and even criticism in liberal media like the Village Voice, the Democratic Convention will not be particularly happy giving him the nomination. The Clinton's fueled by Hillary's presidential aspirations in 2008 will also be on hand to both see that Kerry gets the nomination and to do everything they can to see he loses the election.

30 posted on 05/05/2004 6:29:17 AM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: pabianice
It's more than just in college with this guy.

He was toking at his word processor. He starts his days with a hit of acid. For lunch he washes down his hits of X with a tumbler of Stoli. At tea-time, he tries the teas of Mexico, Maui and the Pacific Northwest. Dinner is not complete without a nice mushroom salad.
31 posted on 05/05/2004 6:29:44 AM PDT by sharktrager (The greatest strength of our Republic is that the people get the government they deserve.)
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To: pabianice
Fat and stupid is no way to go through life son...
32 posted on 05/05/2004 6:33:41 AM PDT by Corin Stormhands (John Kerry: "I am not going to stand for this, nor will I take this sitting down...")
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To: pabianice
Like Carter, Bush is vulnerable to being attacked as someone not up to the job of managing impending global crises.

This is about where I stopped reading...

33 posted on 05/05/2004 6:34:00 AM PDT by Nexus
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To: VisualizeSmallerGovernment
Are you REALLY John Kerry????

LOL....perhaps he could use you as one of his new replacements in his campaign staff.

You got me confused enough.

George W. Bush talks straight from the heart. Kerry babbles so much he gives me a brain cramp.
34 posted on 05/05/2004 6:34:08 AM PDT by not2worry
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To: KJacob
A 2' x 4' has more charisma than Kerry!
35 posted on 05/05/2004 6:35:21 AM PDT by not2worry
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To: pabianice
If not for the Iranian hostage crisis Carter would have lost the nomination. Ford was never elected and G.H.W. Bush had to run against Perrot, Buchanan and Clinton. I agree the election won't be close but the landslide winner will be in favor of the death penalty.
36 posted on 05/05/2004 6:35:54 AM PDT by Phlap (REDNECK@LIBARTS.EDU)
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To: pabianice
If you look at key indicators beyond the neck-and-neck support for the two candidates in the polls--such as high turnout in the early Democratic primaries and the likelihood of a high turnout in November--it seems improbable that Bush will win big. More likely, it's going to be Kerry in a rout.

There was high turnout in New Hampshire only. The rest of the Democrat primaries were low-turnout affairs. But the press kept repeating the "record turnout" nonsense, even though the numbers for each contest were way down. And this was before Jean Francois Kerry had it wrapped up.

37 posted on 05/05/2004 6:39:45 AM PDT by bondjamesbond (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: pabianice; All
Blowin' smoke. Big talk from a spineless rumpswab. I got two words for this soothsayer.... Hillary Clinton.

This bitch will have Kerry assasinated on election night if the polls showed he was leading at dinnertime.

38 posted on 05/05/2004 6:40:19 AM PDT by johnny7 (“Virginians we will stay! Who will come with me?!” -Louis A. Armistead)
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To: You Dirty Rats
"A Kerry landslide is not only possible, it's very likely! The South will rise up and vote for this very liberal patrician candidate from Massachusetts in droves come November!"

I also think the Pope will convert to Islam and the Red Sox will win the World Serious.

Right after Yassar Arafat joins B'nai B'rith.

39 posted on 05/05/2004 6:48:37 AM PDT by pabianice
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To: MJY1288
The fact is it was one of the worst turnouts

North Carolina, due to redistricting court battles had to postpone the states primaries for both parties until July. Being too late for the presidential delegates to the convention to be choosen the state democrat party had a presidential caucus instead. The turn out...

1%!

40 posted on 05/05/2004 6:48:56 AM PDT by Phantom Lord (Distributor of Pain, Your Loss Becomes My Gain)
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To: pabianice

Well here's 7 yrs in college

41 posted on 05/05/2004 6:51:53 AM PDT by petercooper (We did not have to prove Saddam had WMD, he had to prove he didn't.)
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To: pabianice
I heard this speech before. I think it ends with the phrase "Did American's give up when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor".
42 posted on 05/05/2004 6:53:00 AM PDT by VRWC_minion
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To: Redcoat LI; VisualizeSmallerGovernment
Haven't heard a thing about Kerry's "Middle Class Misery Index" since the day it was released. Even the partisan press couldn't push it.
43 posted on 05/05/2004 6:53:19 AM PDT by Phantom Lord (Distributor of Pain, Your Loss Becomes My Gain)
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To: ilgipper
Let them believe that - they're obviously surrounded by typical hate-mongers out of touch with middle America. The more over-confident they are, the less likely they'll "Torcc" him.
44 posted on 05/05/2004 6:54:50 AM PDT by Tigercap
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To: Rick.Donaldson
I am certain that one reason Bush is raising such a huge war chest ($400M?) is that he is creating two separate sets of campaign material: one against Kerry and one against Hillary. Bush is not going to be taken by surprise if a Dem convention knock-down drag-out nominates Hillary.

I still laugh every time I remember what one service buddy told me about Hillary's visit to Iraq. Without exception, every helicopter and jet she commandeered in Iraq for her 'royal visit' was unofficially referred to as "Broomstick One."

45 posted on 05/05/2004 6:54:51 AM PDT by pabianice
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To: pabianice
Well, the mainstream news media will do their best toto to make this becomes true...
46 posted on 05/05/2004 6:55:14 AM PDT by Libertina (Democrats are to lies as "dog years" are to Spot. Many.)
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To: pabianice
In an early April Gallup poll, Kerry trailed Bush 46 percent to 48 percent among likely voters, but led 48 percent to 46 percent among registered voters. Kerry's support had dropped incrementally in a late April Gallup poll, but he continued to garner higher support among registered voters than likely voters.

This is a classic example of twisting negative facts for your candidate to make them look as favorable as possible. Why, he's not behind, he's doing, well, better! I believe the technical term for this is putting lipstick on a pig.

47 posted on 05/05/2004 6:55:30 AM PDT by KellyAdmirer
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To: pabianice
Translation.......

Party fund raising has fallen off and we need to get that cash flowing again.

48 posted on 05/05/2004 6:56:49 AM PDT by blackdog (I feed the sheep the coyotes eat)
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To: alnick
I've bookmarked this article with a note to e-mail the author in November, After Dubya's landslide, just to rub it in.

I like the way you think. Comparing GWB to Carter now are they? Chucky Todd is so whacked-out on something here, but I'll bet they're lapping it up at DU.

If JfK is so popular, why am I hearing that few people come out to his campaign rallies? Contrast that with the 10,000 who came out to see the president in MI on Monday night and 10,000 in Ohio last night. Ha!

49 posted on 05/05/2004 7:05:14 AM PDT by ride the whirlwind (We can't let Kerry win - an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.)
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To: Verginius Rufus
I knew Asinius Gallus. Asinius Gallus was a friend of mine. John Kerry's no Asinius Gallus.

Don't question Asinius Gallus' patriotism, buddy! Where were YOU at the Battle of Actium?

50 posted on 05/05/2004 7:05:14 AM PDT by VisualizeSmallerGovernment (Question Liberal Authority)
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