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Macbeth's Castle Unearthed In Inverness Garden?
Inverness Courier ^ | 5-28-2004

Posted on 05/28/2004 12:51:10 PM PDT by blam

Macbeth's castle unearthed in Inverness garden?

LOCAL history enthusiasts believe they have unearthed positive evidence that a former King of Scotland maintained a castle in Inverness.

Tradition has persisted that Macbeth had a stronghold at Auldcastle Road in the Crown area of the city - hence the name.

Now an archaeological dig by members of the Inverness Local History Forum in the garden of the appropriately-named house Dun Macbeth has uncovered what could be the most important finds to date.

Some artefacts, including pieces of medieval glass and what are thought to be whalebone and porpoise or dolphin bones have been sent away for examination.

But what has really excited the Forum is the discovery of a dressed stone wall underneath what was a raised feature in the garden.

"We don't know for certain if it was Macbeth's castle but certainly everything points to it, " chairman George Christie declared.

"We thought at first it might be just part of a Victorian terraced garden so we cut through that and came upon various layers of archaeological evidence dating beyond the Victorian era back to medieval times."

He described how, at the bottom of the trench, they found a wall over two metres thick.

"Everyone thought that if there was a castle there it would have been a wooden fort. But it is now our belief it had a stone curtain wall with wooden buildings inside."

Evidence was found in the area of a medieval well and Forum members unearthed a silver coin dating back to the 12th Century.

"It was obvious they had been eating either porpoises or dolphins but we can't distinguish between the bones so they have been sent off for examination, " Mr Christie added. "Seafood was obviously an important part of their diet because we also found mussels and oyster shells."

Whalebone was found in another pit and a large post hole which could have supported a roof.

There were also signs of destructive burning, which ties in with the belief that Malcolm Canmore burned down the castle in 1056 in revenge for the death of his father King Duncan at the hands of Macbeth in 1040.

The dig was the first archaeological excavation of the site and the Forum was assisted by freelance consultant archaeologist Stuart Farrell, along with Patricia Weeks and Jon Watt from Inverness Museum.

Mr Christie is now sure there was a defensive wall on the site.

"Some people have questioned the suitability of the area as a site for a castle, " he commented.

"But we have conclusive evidence that the sea came right up to Millburn Road below the hill on which Auld Castle road sits.

"So the site was above the coastline with views right out across the Moray Firth."

Dun Macbeth is owned by Dr Timothy Palmer, a pathologist at Raigmore Hospital, and his wife Rhona. They have been aware of the history of the site since they moved into the house 14 years ago.

Mrs Palmer said the team were very considerate and restored her garden after their work was finished.

"I'll be interested to hear the results of the test, " she said.

28/05/2004


TOPICS: News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: archaeologicaldig; archaeology; castle; economic; garden; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; inverness; macbeths; museum; royals; scotland; scotlandyet; shakespeare; unearthed

1 posted on 05/28/2004 12:51:12 PM PDT by blam
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To: farmfriend

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 05/28/2004 12:51:56 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

"But we have conclusive evidence that the sea came right up to Millburn Road below the hill on which Auld Castle road sits."

Ya mean global warming was raising sea levels in the 1000's? Thank Providence for the Little Ice Age. Maybe we don't know as much about climate change as we thought.


3 posted on 05/28/2004 1:02:03 PM PDT by Socratic (Yes, there is method in the madness.)
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To: blam

Out, damned spot! out, I say!--


4 posted on 05/28/2004 1:03:00 PM PDT by billorites (freepo ergo sum)
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To: blam

I heard that Con Ed workers accidentaly unearthed the original 18th century site of the first 'Famous Rays Pizza' on what is now 4th Ave & 9th Street in Manhattan...


5 posted on 05/28/2004 1:04:22 PM PDT by HitmanLV (I will not be pushed, filed, stamped, indexed, briefed, debriefed or numbered. My life is my own.)
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To: blam; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs; A.J.Armitage; abner; adam_az; AdmSmith; Alas Babylon!; ...
Gods, Graves, Glyphs
List for articles regarding early civilizations , life of all forms, - dinosaurs - etc.
Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this ping list.
6 posted on 05/28/2004 1:08:34 PM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: blam

So, I can see when the neighbor's dog came over to investigate, the archaeologists yelled, "out, out, damned spot!"


7 posted on 05/28/2004 1:20:59 PM PDT by Junior (Sodomy non sapiens)
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To: blam

thanks for your post, I always enjoy them.


8 posted on 05/28/2004 1:59:00 PM PDT by not-alone
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To: blam

Thanks--very cool :)


9 posted on 05/28/2004 2:41:23 PM PDT by Fedora (Smeagol-Gollum 2004: "We can be our own VP, my Precious")
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To: blam

I'd be interested in a follow-up story, but I rarely see anything after a first "discovery" story. Very interesting stuff.


10 posted on 05/28/2004 4:55:17 PM PDT by I'm ALL Right! ("A rich man has no need of character. " ~John Kerry's favorite Hebrew Proverb~)
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To: HitmanNY

I think Sal's on Amsterdam between 73rd and 74th was there since medieval times. But, the store with no name known as Dominic's up on the corner had a box of Maypo on the top shelf that may date back even farther.


11 posted on 05/28/2004 5:02:27 PM PDT by visualops ("I....haven't got any bones.".."Nonsense, nonsense. You'd fall down without them.")
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To: blam

...and King Arthur's castle is outside of Tintagel.


12 posted on 05/28/2004 5:10:02 PM PDT by gorush
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To: blam
There were also signs of destructive burning, which ties in with the belief that Malcolm Canmore burned down the castle in 1056 in revenge for the death of his father King Duncan at the hands of Macbeth in 1040.

"Lay on MacDuff and damned be he who first cries, "Hold, enough'."

By the way, I just finished Dawson's "Ice Age Earth" and it was well worth the effort. It has a lot on Europe and the British Isles as well as the American Ice sheets. Written by and for geologists but comprehensible to dummies like me.

13 posted on 05/28/2004 6:19:50 PM PDT by JimSEA ( "More Bush, Less Taxes.")
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To: JimSEA
"By the way, I just finished Dawson's "Ice Age Earth" and it was well worth the effort. It has a lot on Europe and the British Isles as well as the American Ice sheets. Written by and for geologists but comprehensible to dummies like me."

Thanks, I'll check it out and see if I want to read it.

I got a few questions last week that sent me back to The Tarim Mummies.

I have a question for you. What do you make of this statement on page 281, "This would render the Tocharins virtually native to Gansu (and earlier than the putative spread of the Neolithic to Xinjiang) and Narain goes so far as to argue that the Indo-Europeans themselves originally dispensed from this area westwards. Seldom has a tail so small wagged a dog so large."

14 posted on 05/28/2004 7:17:23 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Interesting question. You also have the Kennewick Man and other early North American discoveries on the one hand. On the other hand, there is the apparent Austro-Asian orign of the Terra Del Fuego people, perhaps going back well over 15,000 years.

As you know, I think things were far more complex than the bulk of the achademics would like. You are never, in my mind, going to get any nice neat liniar path to development or exploration.

No question, the Tocharins are among the most interesting. As more arcaeologists spread onto the Stepp and Iranian/Afghan areas, we may get some answers. The area north of the Tarim Basin may provide some answers. I recall you talking about the Discovery/National Geographic specials.

15 posted on 05/29/2004 8:57:39 PM PDT by JimSEA ( "More Bush, Less Taxes.")
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To: JimSEA
" As more arcaeologists spread onto the Stepp and Iranian/Afghan areas, we may get some answers."

I hope soon. As I was reading the book by Oppenheimer and his saying that some of the refugees from Sundaland went up the rivers/waterways of Asia, even into Tibet. I kept thinking of these Tocharian folks. Are Europeans from Asia?

16 posted on 05/29/2004 9:11:43 PM PDT by blam
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To: JimSEA
...and another thing.

The fabrics described by Elizabeth Barber (Mummies Of Urumchi) and how similar (almost exact) they were to the fabrics of the famous Celtic site at Halstadt. These folks were 1,000 years and 5,000 miles apart. It makes sense if they were migrating toward Halstadt instead of the other way around as I have been thinking. Did the Celts come out of Asia?

17 posted on 05/29/2004 9:18:11 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
That spurs interest as you think about the Megalith Cultures and the cave art which was such a golden age of early man. They had to have been there a long time and the Basques would seem to be one group of their decendents.

Of course the linguists would say that they are distinct and unrelated to the Indo-European. So this gives you six distinct areas of cultural origins. Semetic Middle East, Europe, North Africa, Iran/Stepp, China and Southeast Asian basin. Each has very distinct elements very early that the others do not.

18 posted on 05/29/2004 9:29:47 PM PDT by JimSEA ( "More Bush, Less Taxes.")
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To: JimSEA

Do you know if any Cro-Magnon skeletons have ever been found in Asia?


19 posted on 05/29/2004 9:34:43 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Apparently, any "modern" human between 40,000 and 10,000 years ago having generally African skull appearance is labled Cro-Magnon. Some European skulls retained the appearance up to 5,000 years ago. I find this rather unsatisfactory but the science of skull classification is "iffy" when you consider to comentary on it in the Tarim book.


20 posted on 05/29/2004 9:57:21 PM PDT by JimSEA ( "More Bush, Less Taxes.")
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To: blam

Now, if they can just find Burham Wood over there in Dunsenane ...


21 posted on 05/29/2004 9:59:47 PM PDT by MHGinTN (If you can read this, you've had life support from someone. Promote life support for others.)
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To: blam

BTTT


22 posted on 06/24/2007 10:13:49 PM PDT by Cincinna (HILLARY & HER HINO :: Keep the Arkansas Grifters out of the White house.)
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Just updating the GGG information, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
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Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

23 posted on 07/03/2007 11:01:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated July 3, 2007.)
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To: blam; sionnsar

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
From 2004. Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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24 posted on 10/20/2009 6:42:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: DuncanWaring; snuffy smiff; ottbmare; colorcountry; Irish Eyes; Cailleach; ReneeLynn; Beowulf9; ...
Thanks to SunkenCiv for the ping.

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This is an ultra-low-volume ping list (typically weeks to months between pings, for matters related to Highland bagpipes and Scotland).
FReepmail sionnsar if you want on or off this list.

Going to the Games? Organize a Clan FReeper get-together!

25 posted on 10/21/2009 3:20:10 PM PDT by sionnsar (IranAzadi|5yst3m 0wn3d-it's N0t Y0ur5:SONY|Remember Neda Agha-Soltan|TV--it's NOT news you can trust)
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To: blam

BUAIDH NO BAS!


26 posted on 10/21/2009 3:30:53 PM PDT by SWAMPSNIPER (THE SECOND AMENDMENT, A MATTER OF FACT, NOT A MATTER OF OPINION)
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To: blam

Five years ago. What’s the diagnosis?


27 posted on 10/21/2009 5:10:05 PM PDT by ReneeLynn (Socialism is SO yesterday. Fascism, it*s the new black. Mmm Mmm Mmm.)
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To: sionnsar
This thread is from 2004.

We Scots like to live in the past, but this is just silly. 8~)

28 posted on 10/21/2009 6:16:11 PM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ("I don't think they want my respect; I think they want my submission." - Flemming Rose)
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To: sionnsar

We are going to the Meadow Highlands Games and Celtic Festival on Saturday (between Fredricksburg, and Richmond, VA).
http://www.richmondceltic.com/home


29 posted on 10/22/2009 5:13:36 AM PDT by Cailleach
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