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Bird's-Eye View Of The Amazon (Airborne Archaeologist Challenges The Myth Of A Pristine Wilderness)
Penn Arts And Science ^ | 5-30-2004 | Ted Mann

Posted on 05/30/2004 5:31:44 PM PDT by blam

Bird’s-Eye View of the Amazon Airborne Archaeologist Challenges the Myth of a Pristine Wilderness

by Ted Mann

In the office of a typical archaeologist, you would expect to find things like stone tools, pottery fragments, and maybe even a few Wooly Mammoth bones. But Clark Erickson is no typical archaeologist. Oversize rolls of aerial photographs are stacked into tubular pyramids on a desk and worktable in his University Museum office. They fill up file cabinets and populate a storage room. At last count, he had about 700 giant aerial and satellite images—almost all of them picturing some region of the Amazon.

He rolls out a 1958 U.S. Air Force photo of a Bolivian savannah. Even with the vast acreage blown up to movie-poster size, the details are as impenetrable as braille to the sighted. “See that,” he says, pointing to a line running across the landscape. “Anything that’s straight—it’s not natural.” With a finger, he traces a symmetrical block of toothpick shapes. “These are raised fields. See, you can pick out the linear patterns.” With Erickson’s narration, more and more geometric designs pop off the glossy print—settlement mounds, fish weirs, irrigation canals, roads. The photo begins to look like a prehistoric engineering blueprint. Unlike most archaeologists, Erickson doesn’t begin his research in excavated holes; he starts in the sky, reading the landscape for markers of vanished civilizations.

For the past decade, Erickson has used aerial images—borrowed from the military, scientists, and even oil companies—to guide his fieldwork. What he’s discovered about the prehistoric Amazon challenges many textbook teachings. Before Columbus, he argues, the area was heavily populated and agriculturally advanced. His work has led to a surprising supposition: Humans may have engineered nearly every aspect of the Amazon landscape.

As an undergraduate, Erickson wasted no time becoming an archaeologist. He was part of an excavation on the first day of freshman-year classes and then spent two summers at digs on Lake Titicaca in South America. The biggest discovery of his young career came at the end—in the rear-view mirror of a beat-up Volkswagen bus. The team was departing on a five-hour drive back to “civilization.” On an unpaved, uninhabited stretch of road, cresting over a ridge, Erickson stole one last glance at the diminishing lakebed. Through the cracked windows, he couldn’t believe what he saw: an unnatural crosshatch pattern. It covered several square miles, and it seemed to be human-made.

In this part of the Amazon, farming is difficult. The soil spends half the year scorched in desert heat and the other half inundated with rain. For this reason, say scholars, the region is incapable of sustaining large civilizations. Erickson believes the raised fields he glimpsed through the back window of his microbus were a solution hit upon by an ancient people. The system of mounds and canals provided irrigation in the dry season and drained the soil during floods. Ten years before, geographer William Denevan had written about the fields, but by the 1970s, when Erickson was there, no archaeologist had studied them. No one knew the age of the structures, who built them, or if they even worked.

By the time Erickson earned a Ph.D., he was itching to return. But as he hiked the dirt roads in search of the earthen structures he’d glimpsed before, the ancient fields seemed to have disappeared. From that point on, he says, “I vowed never to set foot on the landscape without having studied aerial photographs first.” Now he rents a $300-an- hour Cessna, and a team of three students helps him photograph the sites from every angle.

With aerial images, Erickson rediscovered the missing raised fields, and he immediately began analyzing them. Subsequent digs proved that the mounded fields date back to about 100 B.C. and may have been cultivated until A.D. 1100. The dimensions of the rectangular plots were astounding: Each row rose three feet high, measured up to 30 feet wide, and stretched 1,300 feet long. Between the rows were canals, also 30 feet wide and three feet deep.

As much as he learned about the fields, he kept coming back to one nagging question: Were they productive? To answer this, he tried a little “experimental archaeology”— recreating ancient tools and methods in order to better understand how the raised fields worked. With help from colleagues and local farmers, he built a field from scratch and worked it year-round. “We found that productivity was three to four times traditional practices like slash-and-burn,” he reports.

The more time Erickson spent in South America, the more he kept running into, and collaborating with, a group of sympathetic researchers, including Denevan and anthropologist William Balée. Together, the three men challenged conventional thinking about the Amazon. To begin with, they dismissed “the pristine myth” that the Americas before Columbus were an untouched Eden. Denevan countered that, in fact, much of the Amazon is anthropogenic—human made—and the sheer number of engineered earthworks and their size, he concluded, would have required a massive workforce.

Looking at an aerial photo of the Baures region of Bolivia, Erickson’s index finger dances between dark polka dots covering bare earth. These, he notes, are forest islands and mounds that can rise 60 feet above the savanna. Causeways radiate from them like spokes on a wheel. Erickson and Balée have shown that the mounds were once settlements, housing between 500 and 1,000 inhabitants. Beneath the canopies of the island forests, the two men discovered pottery, bones, and orchards of fruit trees. The dozens of raised causeways, however, still leave Erickson scratching his head. Most are straight as a ruler, stretching from mound to mound. “It looks like everyone in the society had their own road and used it once!”

For all the evidence that Erickson and his colleagues have offered, there is still resistance to the idea of a once populous Amazon. Old-school anthropol-ogists, like the Smithsonian’s Betty Meggers, hold that the region’s aluminum-rich soil couldn’t have supported the agricultural base a large civilization needs to thrive. Environmentalists push the “pristine myth” and, Erickson fears, often see his work as “some excuse that we’re giving developers to go and rape the Amazon.” Even natural scientists abhor the new anthropocentric view of the Amazon. “When I give talks at the Field Museum in Chicago, there is always a bunch of them literally yelling at me.” Meggers went so far as to claim, in the journal Latin American Antiquity, that “the myth of El Dorado is being revived by archaeologists.”

In an ironic twist, the lost gold of El Dorado may turn out to be that oft maligned soil. In the 1990s, geologists began examining Amazonian earth, and though much was inhospitable, large swaths turned out to be fertile. Called Amazonian Dark Earth, or terra preta by locals, this near-black soil has amazing properties. Dark Earth retains its nutrients during tropical rains, while other soil is leeched, and like potting soil, it is far more productive for growing crops. The trait that makes it so exceptional, and enigmatic, is its ability to regenerate. Locals quarry and farm the rich soil, and their supply always grows back. Dark Earth re-creates itself atop a base layer and grows—just like a living organism.

Scientists are still analyzing the biology, but Erickson believes the Amazon Indians enriched their earth with a microorganism, one that resisted depletion and helped fertilize. If better understood, this process of inoculating poor soil with a bacterial booster could aid parts of the undeveloped world starved for agriculture. Recently, geographers estimated that the creators of this ancient technology managed to terraform at least 10 percent of Amazonia—an area the size of France. Along with the raised fields, fish weirs, causeways, and other anthropogenic features, Dark Earth may in fact be one of countless footprints left by a lost civilization. Indeed, if Erickson is right, the Amazon could be humankind’s largest engineering relic.

Ted Mann, C’00, wrote for the winter issue.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: agriculture; airborne; amazon; animalhusbandry; archaeologists; archaeology; birdseye; climate; dietandcuisine; droght; ecology; economic; environment; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; huntergatherers; latinamerica; myth; pristine; rainfall; roosevelt; view; wilderness

1 posted on 05/30/2004 5:31:45 PM PDT by blam
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To: Physicist

Pennping


2 posted on 05/30/2004 5:34:01 PM PDT by aposiopetic
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To: aposiopetic

entropy


3 posted on 05/30/2004 5:39:33 PM PDT by knarf (A place where anyone can learn anything ... especially that which promotes clear thinking.)
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To: farmfriend

GGG Ping.


4 posted on 05/30/2004 5:40:16 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
I'm reminded..yet again...of Galileo: you'd think academics would know better. Hubris.

Kudos to Erickson. ("It does move!" BUMP)

5 posted on 05/30/2004 5:47:25 PM PDT by dasboot
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To: knarf
Entropy?
6 posted on 05/30/2004 5:48:20 PM PDT by dasboot
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To: blam
Curucu Ping!



7 posted on 05/30/2004 5:49:13 PM PDT by bwteim (Begin With The End In Mind. Save your finger and your mouse: Oct 5, 2001 ;)
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To: blam

Thanks, blam. Another good post.


8 posted on 05/30/2004 5:54:37 PM PDT by cayuga
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To: blam

Seems environmentalism is shown again to be only about prohibiting private property.


9 posted on 05/30/2004 5:58:33 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (Vote!)
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To: blam
In the office of a typical archaeologist, you would expect to find things like stone tools, pottery fragments, and maybe even a few Wooly Mammoth bones.

Wrong. Its books and computers now. I have three computers and have long since covered the two windows with extra book cases. (Didn't like that view anyway.)

And I have a private office upstairs with 48 feet of additional bookshelf (all full) and another computer.

10 posted on 05/30/2004 5:59:16 PM PDT by Coyoteman (I'm an archaeologist. I WORK for a living!)
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To: dasboot
At one time, man was very civilized and 'cultured' in that area.

Something has happened for man and his culture disappear from there.

What and why?

I propose we're not advancing but rather digressing.

Perhaps entropy was the wrong word ... how about 2nd Law of thermodynamics.

11 posted on 05/30/2004 6:02:29 PM PDT by knarf (A place where anyone can learn anything ... especially that which promotes clear thinking.)
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To: Coyoteman
You can never have to many books.

A few years ago, I saw a NG special on this area (described in this article) and one archaeologist said that it would have taken a population of 50 million to do all that work.

12 posted on 05/30/2004 6:04:58 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Recently had to read "A River Ran Wild" for a children's lit class. Found it very biased in that it makes it seem that the indigenous peoples did very little to the land. Hopefully, more such research can help put the story straight.


13 posted on 05/30/2004 6:08:21 PM PDT by P.O.E.
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To: knarf
An Origin Of New World Agriculture In Coastal Ecuador (12,000BP)
14 posted on 05/30/2004 6:10:13 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

The strange productiveness might be related to fish emulsion.

A nastier smelling product I can't imagine but it makes plants grow.


15 posted on 05/30/2004 6:11:39 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (What do they call children in Palestine? Unexploded ordinance)
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To: knarf
I think I see your point: The sociological construct necessary for technological progress can, (and/or most assuredly will) (entropy) 'diffuse' (atrophy?): and the technological creation of the social paradigm cannot sustain itself without recourse to the necessary traditions which made the technology possible in the first place.

Roger that!

16 posted on 05/30/2004 6:13:25 PM PDT by dasboot
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To: P.O.E.
Read This :

1491

"Before it became the New World, the Western Hemisphere was vastly more populous and sophisticated than has been thought—an altogether more salubrious place to live at the time than, say, Europe. New evidence of both the extent of the population and its agricultural advancement leads to a remarkable conjecture: the Amazon rain forest may be largely a human artifact.

17 posted on 05/30/2004 6:15:12 PM PDT by blam
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To: dasboot
Geeez ... did I say all that?

Thanx

18 posted on 05/30/2004 6:16:17 PM PDT by knarf (A place where anyone can learn anything ... especially that which promotes clear thinking.)
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To: knarf

What happened was tuberculosis, influenza and measles.

These diseases, inadvertently introduced into the Americas by the newly arrived Europeans, spread like wildfire through the indigenous populations.

Literally millions died, 99% of whom never met a European or even knew of their existence. There is little doubt that this is what happened in the Amazon.

There have been a number of past posts on this subject here on FR. After I do a bit of research, I'll post the links if I can find them.


19 posted on 05/30/2004 6:22:09 PM PDT by John Valentine ("The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits." - Albert Einstein)
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To: knarf
I propose we're not advancing but rather digressing. Our technology progresses, while the sociatal conditions which make it possible, 'digress' (ungress? :^). At some point, the structure fails catostrophically, and weeds grow over the interstates.

We progress and antigress at the same time.

20 posted on 05/30/2004 6:29:04 PM PDT by dasboot
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To: blam
Another little understood culture inhabited Jackson County, Indiana. They left behind extensive mound structures surrounded by an immense leveled plain, but they didn't bury their dead in the mounds, nor did they place artifacts in them.

For the last century and a half professional archaeologists have declared the mounds to be natural in origin, not manmade, because there are neither remains nor artifacts in the mounds (typical of Woodland Indians they know about).

The Jackson county culture is very similar to one of the earliest found on the Peruvian Pacific coast which also built mounds without artifacts or human remains in them. That culture also created an immense level plain in their settlement area.

Here an archaeologist has evidence of a third culture that built mounds (with some artifacts), as well as large level plains around them.

The mounds in Jackson County (mostly in and around Seymour, Indiana) were not "piled up" with thousands of baskets of dirt and sand. Rather, they look more like mounds "left behind" as the plain around them was flattened.

Just West of Seymour is a Council Circle used by American Indians. During the period of white expansion this circle served to provide the delineation of what's called the Ten O'Clock Line to the NW, and another survey line to the NE. These lines themselves parallel the Southernmost lines of a piece of astro-archaeology near Anderson, Indiana where paleo-Indians had constructed a series of mounds that mimic the Big Dipper constellation. Those mounds have no buried artifacts in them either, although there are other mounds in the area that do ~ those with astronimical significance are empty of identity!

We don't really know who built them.

I'd say this guy is on the right track once he starts identifying mounds and raised bed structures with astronomical significance.

At the same time "I" will be on an even bigger track having noted the similarities of two paleo-cultures 5,000+ miles apart!

HISTORIC NOTE: Freeman Field at Seymour was built right on this same level plain for use as a base for the Black Air Force of WWII.

21 posted on 05/30/2004 6:29:12 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: blam

bttt


22 posted on 05/30/2004 6:33:02 PM PDT by jra
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To: dasboot
I propose we're not advancing but rather digressing.

Our technology progresses, while the societal conditions which make it possible, 'digress' (ungress? :^). At some point, the structure fails catastrophically, and weeds grow over the interstates.

We progress and antigress at the same time.

(I feel better...I suck at this posting stuff))

23 posted on 05/30/2004 6:35:17 PM PDT by dasboot
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To: dasboot
Rainforest Researchers Hit Paydirt (Farming 11K Years Ago In South America)
24 posted on 05/30/2004 6:38:28 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Words are fine, but if we don't get pictures in this Internet thing, we will file all this in the same drawer with Hoagland's Martian stuff.


25 posted on 05/30/2004 6:39:13 PM PDT by RightWhale (Theorems link concepts; proofs establish links)
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To: muawiyah
I've read a little about the mounds you describe. I don't think they are the same as 'raised-beds.' The mounds you describe are much larger and taller.

1100 years ago category 5 hurricanes were much more frequent than today. I often wonder if they were a refuge from the flooding from these 'super hurricanes.'

26 posted on 05/30/2004 6:46:59 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
The Seymour mounds are about the same height as the Anderson mounds that have astronomical significance.

15 feet is typical; there are some taller ones about 20 feet high.

Adena and Hopewell structures are far larger, made of earth, and ordinarily have human remains and artifacts buried in them.

27 posted on 05/30/2004 6:49:34 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah
"Adena and Hopewell structures are far larger, made of earth, and ordinarily have human remains and artifacts buried in them."

These are the ones I was referring to.

BTW, do you know who were the Adena? Have you read the stories about giant skeletons (with double rows of teeth) that the early settlers claim to have found in the region?

28 posted on 05/30/2004 7:03:11 PM PDT by blam
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To: John Valentine
Here is one of them: Ancient Amazon Settlements Uncovered
29 posted on 05/30/2004 7:14:45 PM PDT by John Valentine ("The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits." - Albert Einstein)
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To: blam

Interesting, but I'd like to see some data that these conclusions are based upon.


30 posted on 05/30/2004 7:32:02 PM PDT by curmudgeonII (Time wounds all heels.)
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To: John Valentine

Thanks for the link, I'd forgotten that one.


31 posted on 05/30/2004 7:44:37 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs; A.J.Armitage; abner; adam_az; AdmSmith; Alas Babylon!; ...
Gods, Graves, Glyphs
List for articles regarding early civilizations , life of all forms, - dinosaurs - etc.
Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this ping list.
32 posted on 05/31/2004 9:45:45 AM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: farmfriend
Ancient earthen causeways crossing the savannas of the Bolivian Amazon

33 posted on 06/01/2004 4:55:33 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: blam
Ancient causeways and fish weirs in the Prehispanic Hydraulic Complex of Baures, Bolivia

34 posted on 06/01/2004 4:56:57 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: blam
Here is a collection of images relating to the recent article by Dr. Clark Erickson on fishweirs in the Bolivian Amazon. Click each thumbnail to view an larger version. All photos are available in high-resolution versions (approximately 1980 x1340 pixels).

Email Clark Erickson at cerickso@sas.upenn.edu for details.


Click here for a link to image captions

All information contained on this site is EMBARGOED by the Journal Nature unil 2 p.m. EST November 8, 2000

01 02 03 04
05 06 07 08
09 10 11 12
13 14 16 17
18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25
b01 b02 b03 b04
b05 b06 b07 b08
b09 b10 b11 b12
 
b13 b14 b15  
Click here for a link to image captions


35 posted on 06/01/2004 4:59:38 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: blam
Here is a collection of figures pertaining to the recent article by Dr. Clark Erickson on fishweirs in the Bolivian Amazon. Click each thumbnail to view an Adobe Acrobat pdf file


All information contained on this site is EMBARGOED by the Journal Nature unil 2 p.m. EST November 8, 2000
All images, figures, and related information are the property of Clark Erickson. ©2000 Clark L. Erickson.

 

36 posted on 06/01/2004 5:02:08 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: ckilmer; blam

very cool pictures. Thanks for the addition.


37 posted on 06/01/2004 5:09:59 PM PDT by farmfriend ( In Essentials, Unity...In Non-Essentials, Liberty...In All Things, Charity.)
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To: ckilmer

Prehispanic Raised Fields

Prehispanic raised fields in the savannas of the Llanos de Moxos of Bolivia. The elevated planting platforms are 20 meters wide, 0.2-1 meter tall, and up to 600 meters long.


38 posted on 06/01/2004 5:10:09 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: blam

Thank you for posting this very interesting article. b.


39 posted on 06/01/2004 5:28:06 PM PDT by Barset
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To: ckilmer; RightWhale
Excellent pictures, thanks.

Hey RightWhale, we have (more than words) pictures.

40 posted on 06/01/2004 5:44:32 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Very kool. Makes my weekend garden activities seem somewhat trivial.


41 posted on 06/01/2004 5:51:03 PM PDT by RightWhale (Theorems link concepts; proofs establish links)
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To: blam

Could be.


42 posted on 06/05/2004 9:06:50 AM PDT by aculeus
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To: knarf
Perhaps entropy was the wrong word ... how about 2nd Law of thermodynamics.

Unless "entropy" was the name of an Amerind tribe?

43 posted on 06/08/2004 5:29:48 PM PDT by rightofrush (right of Rush, and Buchanan too.)
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To: blam
Hello Blam. I am an old Archaeology student and would love to be on your Archaeology-Ancitne History ping list, if you have one. Take care and I look forward to your future posts.
44 posted on 06/25/2004 8:04:59 AM PDT by Richard Axtell
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To: Richard Axtell; farmfriend
"Hello Blam. I am an old Archaeology student and would love to be on your Archaeology-Ancitne History ping list, if you have one."

Freeper 'farmfriend' manages this list...I've pinged her.

45 posted on 06/25/2004 8:11:48 AM PDT by blam
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Just updating the GGG information, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
Gods, Graves, Glyphs PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

46 posted on 05/14/2006 4:11:57 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
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Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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47 posted on 08/31/2008 10:48:11 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile hasn't been updated since Friday, May 30, 2008)
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