Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

National Public Radio PR Plans 'Major' News Expansion
CNSNEWS.com ^ | 6/16/04 | Susan Jones

Posted on 06/16/2004 3:59:29 AM PDT by kattracks

(CNSNews.com) - National Public Radio has decided to use a philanthropist's generous donation for a "major expansion" of its news operation.

NPR announced on Tuesday that it would spend $15 million over the next three years on additional reporters, editors, producers and managers; as well as new domestic and international bureaus.

The 2004-2007 expansion will be funded in part by interest from the $225 million in bequests that NPR received from the late philanthropist Joan Kroc, the widow of the man who founded McDonald's.

Joan Kroc died in October 2003. NPR has described her bequest as "the largest monetary gift ever received by an American cultural institution."

'Serious and thoughtful content'


On Tuesday, NPR called its news expansion "unique in the current media climate." NPR noted that it is expanding at a time when other news media organizations continue a pattern of retrenchment -- eliminating staff, bureaus and resources -- to increase profits.

"This investment will expand NPR's capacity to bring in-depth and top-quality reporting to its growing audience, at a time when other news organizations are retreating from the presentation of serious and thoughtful content," said Kevin Klose, NPR's president and CEO.

"Our goal is to serve our stations and their listeners with expanded in-depth reports from around the country and the world. We recognize that in this era, Americans seek reliable fact-based journalism that is up-to-the-minute and provides deep context and detail."

NPR says it has experienced rapid audience growth in the last decade, from 11.5 million weekly listeners in 1994 to 22 million in 2004.

NPR said its expansion plan includes the hiring of 45 additional news personnel, a 15 percent staff increase. The extra personnel will allow NPR to "improve coverage of breaking news and develop deeper investigative reporting," it said in a press release.

NPR also said it plans to expand staff for its Morning Edition and All Things Considered news programs, as well as its new Day to Day midday news program. "These new positions will enhance Morning Edition's ability to broadcast from both coasts and permit hosts the opportunity to do more reporting and in-depth work," NPR said.

NPR also plans to open new foreign bureaus in the next three years, in addition to the 14 it already has. The new bureaus will help NPR "expand coverage of such under-reported places as Asia, Latin America and Africa," the press release said.

NPR also plans to "enhance and expand in-depth local news," which it describes as "a critically important need for millions of Americans that is increasingly ignored by many other broadcasters."

And finally, NPR said it will establish a radio and Internet news training program for young people. "The fellowships will broaden and diversify staff and develop future staff and talent for public radio," it said.

"We have always been a lean news group that does more with less," NPR's CEO Kevin Klose said. "We now will be able to do better with more.

"That means, among other things, having the flexibility to cover and provide context for what's in the news now while we're uncovering the people, places and ideas that are emerging in the news."

Founded in 1970 with 90 member stations, NPR describes itself as a "primary source of news, information and cultural expression for nearly 22 million listeners a week via more than 770 public radio stations."

As CNSNew.com reported earlier, NPR receives indirect support from federal taxpayers.

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a government-funded nonprofit corporation created by Congress in 1967, funnels tax dollars to 770 NPR affiliates nationwide in the form of Community Service Grants.

In turn, about 50 percent of NPR's national operating budget comes from those local affiliates, which pay to run NPR programming, CEO Klose said.

Klose said only a small percentage of NPR's annual budget comes from federal taxpayers. Most of it comes from foundation grants and corporate underwriting.

But critics have questioned whether NPR should receive any taxpayer dollars.

See Earlier Story:
NPR's Public Funding Questioned After $200 Million Donation (7 Nov. 2003)



TOPICS: Culture/Society; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 501c3; defundnpr; defundpbsnpr; defundtheleft; leftwinghateradio; npr; propaganda; publicbroadcasting; taxdollarsatwork; taxfraud; youpayforthis
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-27 next last

1 posted on 06/16/2004 3:59:31 AM PDT by kattracks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: kattracks

Gee, thanks a lot, Joan.


2 posted on 06/16/2004 4:01:04 AM PDT by Larry Lucido
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

After Kerry loses the election, his entire staff can go work for NPR. They will feel right at home.


3 posted on 06/16/2004 4:01:33 AM PDT by reg45
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Larry Lucido

Well, somebody has to take up the slack now that (Hot)Air America is floundering.


4 posted on 06/16/2004 4:03:49 AM PDT by kattracks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

NPR doesn't need or deserve taxpayer money.


5 posted on 06/16/2004 4:05:03 AM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

Despite the flurry of quote marks in the article, the poster forgot to put quotes around the word "news" after NPR. Just for clarity's sake.


6 posted on 06/16/2004 4:05:28 AM PDT by Hardastarboard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

Well, I wondered whether she couldn't find an orphanage to donate to. Guess Air America, NPR, etc. are in danger of becoming orphaned, though.


7 posted on 06/16/2004 4:06:55 AM PDT by Larry Lucido
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

My thoughts exactly. And what better way of doing it than making the taxpayer pay for it?

I don't care how little of my money goes to NPR-Air America, it makes me sick knowing I have to support their garbage in any way.

I used to listen to my local NPR for the classical music, but now that they recently announced that they've decided to get rid of much of their music programming and replace it with commentary, I never listen to it. I don't know how they're getting away with this.


8 posted on 06/16/2004 4:09:09 AM PDT by livius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

Besides, now NPR can to in-depth interviews with the author of "Super-Size Me," and launch its own crusades against unhealthy fast food (the children, you know). Of course, that would hurt the company her late husband founded, but hey, he's gone too.


9 posted on 06/16/2004 4:09:25 AM PDT by Larry Lucido
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: kattracks
What a crock.

Sorry, somebody had to say it.

;-)

10 posted on 06/16/2004 4:12:23 AM PDT by mombonn (íViva Bush/Cheney!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks
"We recognize that in this era, Americans seek reliable fact-based journalism that is up-to-the-minute and provides deep context and detail."

Which they're damned sure not going to get from NPR.

"The new bureaus will help NPR "expand coverage of such under-reported places as Asia, Latin America and Africa," the press release said.

"Under-reported?" Laughable, considering that NPR is the home of reporting of events such as Kenyan Underwater Basket-Weaving as it is. Paid for by your tax dollars, John Q. Sucker.

But critics have questioned whether NPR should receive any taxpayer dollars.

No duh. PBS runs commercials, has frequent pledge drives, and STILL receives taxpayer money.

PBS - an idea whose time has gone.

11 posted on 06/16/2004 4:12:53 AM PDT by asgardshill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks
Not a dime of this money will be spent searching for qualified conservative commentators even though as a 501c3, NPR is REQUIRED to abstain from advocating for/against a candidate/political party or piece of legislation.

They are permitted to have guests on who advocate if they offer equal time to voice the opposing viewpoint.

12 posted on 06/16/2004 4:14:20 AM PDT by weegee (Government does not solve problems; it subsidizes them. ~~Ronald Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: livius
I used to listen to my local NPR for the classical music, but now that they recently announced that they've decided to get rid of much of their music programming and replace it with commentary, I never listen to it.

Here is a whole article on this subject:

Radio Silence. How NPR purged classical music from its airwaves.

13 posted on 06/16/2004 4:17:11 AM PDT by weegee (Government does not solve problems; it subsidizes them. ~~Ronald Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: weegee
Not a dime of this money will be spent searching for qualified conservative commentators even though as a 501c3, NPR is REQUIRED to abstain from advocating for/against a candidate/political party or piece of legislation.

FACT: The corrupt IRS is a Democratic-party organ which enables such violations.

14 posted on 06/16/2004 4:19:03 AM PDT by Diogenesis (We do only what we are meant to do)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

NPR is trying to challenge the government for the title to "most employees." That's why we have to keep sending them our tax money, so they can provide more sinecures for leftwing college grads who don't want to actually work.


15 posted on 06/16/2004 4:22:30 AM PDT by arthurus (Better to fight them over THERE than over HERE.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Diogenesis
I will say that there certainly are a lot of 501c3 tax cheating organizations. Many of them are on the left. The only time prosecution ever makes the news when it is some religious organization that gets involved in politics (sometimes the violation can be as simple as having a recommended candidates list available in the lobby).

I've seen more than this at Pacifica (you can get Green Party literature there).

16 posted on 06/16/2004 4:23:18 AM PDT by weegee (Government does not solve problems; it subsidizes them. ~~Ronald Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: kattracks
Klose said only a small percentage of NPR's annual budget comes from federal taxpayers. Most of it comes from foundation grants and corporate underwriting.

hmmmm...if that's so, why would Mzzz Totenberg be so concerned about us cutting it??

Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2000
On NPR's Morning Edition, Nina Totenberg reported that if the Supreme Court supports Congress to cut the budget of the National Endowment of the Arts, it is in effect the end of NEA. This situation creates great concerns about Congressional funding for creative arts in America,

since NEA provides major support for NPR (National Public Radio),

PBS (Public Broadcasting System), and numerous other creative and performing arts. If NEA is lost or weakened, our lives will be similarly diminished.

Sooo, which is it?
Small %
OR
Major support

17 posted on 06/16/2004 4:28:33 AM PDT by evad (It has been determined that research causes cancer in RATs.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks; Drango

What can be said?

(Psst - see the tagline...)


18 posted on 06/16/2004 5:04:35 AM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (Back to an old favorite: DEFUND NPR & PBS - THE AMERICAN PRAVDA)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks
N ational P eoples R adio

All fund-drive...All the time.

19 posted on 06/16/2004 5:05:30 AM PDT by Khurkris (Will the wind ever remember the names it has blown in the past, It whispers no this will be the last)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kattracks

Why is it when ditsy females inherit money from their capitalist husbands they turn around and waste the cash on left wing Marxists?


20 posted on 06/16/2004 5:07:08 AM PDT by sergeantdave (Gen. Custer wore an Arrowsmith shirt to his last property owner convention.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-27 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson