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To: PatrickHenry

Lower? Wasn't it supposed to have been faster 6000 years ago?


20 posted on 06/30/2004 1:41:09 PM PDT by VadeRetro
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To: VadeRetro
Wasn't it supposed to have been faster 6000 years ago?

Very confusing. I'm pretty sure it slowed down for Joshua when he made the sun stand still. Otherwise, I donno. I've misplaced my notes.

37 posted on 06/30/2004 1:48:12 PM PDT by PatrickHenry (Felix, qui potuit rerum cognoscere causas.)
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To: VadeRetro
Lower? Wasn't it supposed to have been faster 6000 years ago?

Ahem. Nothing existed 6000 years ago, Mr. Beelzebub. Where do you get these crazy questions from? Sheesh!

42 posted on 06/30/2004 1:51:54 PM PDT by Shryke (Never retreat. Never explain. Get it done and let them howl.)
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To: VadeRetro
If you read down in the article the lower alpha means a faster speed of light. In other words cdk. This has been coming from a gathering and diverse group for over a decade now.

There are a couple of guys over at Berkley and a Russian Physics dude...etc. This is just one more added to the list. It'll still probably take another 10-20 years before all the empirical evidence has enough weight to make it mainstream. But cdk seems to be the gathering momentum ,(for the moment,) as the most promising solution in the quest for the mythical universal constant.

117 posted on 06/30/2004 2:48:44 PM PDT by D Rider
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To: VadeRetro
Lower? Wasn't it supposed to have been faster 6000 years ago?

From the Article:

Horizon problem

Some physicists would happily accept a variable alpha. For example, if it had been lower in the past, meaning a higher speed of light, it would solve the "horizon problem".

Cosmologists have struggled to explain why far-flung regions of the universe are at roughly the same temperature. It implies that these regions were once close enough to exchange energy and even out the temperature, yet current models of the early universe prevent this from happening, unless they assume an ultra-fast expansion right after the big bang.

However, a higher speed of light early in the history of the universe would allow energy to pass between these areas in the form of light.

185 posted on 07/01/2004 6:23:22 AM PDT by P-Marlowe
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To: VadeRetro

Correct. It was supposed to be faster. Consistent readings of the speed show a slight but continuing decrease.

As measurements are refined, over a few more years, we will have an absolute answer about whether it is occurring, but there is still afaik atheoretical basis for it.

This site has a good summation.

http://www.ldolphin.org/constc.shtml

It may be a consequence of the new theory (discovered by me in 94, and by Sima and Sukenik of Slovakia in '89) of the Expansive Non-decelerative Universe.


214 posted on 07/01/2004 8:33:15 AM PDT by djf
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