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Broadcast Lobby Fighting Satellite Radio
foxnews.com ^ | Friday, July 02, 2004 | By Radley Balko

Posted on 07/03/2004 6:11:22 PM PDT by ovrtaxt

Broadcast Lobby Fighting Satellite Radio

Friday, July 02, 2004

By Radley Balko

ARCHIVE

I haven't listened to FM radio in years. With a few exceptions, the artists I enjoy don't get airplay. If your taste in music runs deeper than Fred Durst, Kid Rock, or Jessica Simpson, you've probably experienced the same thing.

Last Christmas, someone bought me a receiver and a subscription to XM satellite radio. I now listen to radio again.

XM offers about a hundred stations, covering every genre of music you can imagine. There's a station called "Hank's Place," which plays only authentic 1950s-era country music. There's also "Frank's Place," which plays only Sinatra-ish standards. There are several jazz channels, a live channel, an acoustic channel, and a channel for unsigned bands. There are two channels of soul, three channels of Christian rock, two channels of thrash-speed metal, and nearly everything in between.

There's a comedy channel that plays stand-up snippets from Lenny Bruce, George Carlin and Richard Pryor; and another that plays more family-friendly bits. There are news, family and talk channels, and audio feeds from about a dozen cable television networks, including Fox News.

In short, XM is everything FM radio could be, but isn't. And so, predictably, FM radio interests are doing everything they can to keep XM at bay.

Traditional (sometimes called "terrestrial") FM radio stations are represented in Washington, D.C. by the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), one of the oldest, most powerful, most entrenched lobbying organizations around. NAB has wielded that power at the expense of technology, innovation, and — ultimately — consumers.

NAB fought cable television through every stage of its development, meaning that if the NAB had its way, you'd have no FOX News, no Comedy Central, and no HBO. Just the big three networks. NAB failed there. But as Jesse Walker has documented in Reason magazine and in his book Rebels on the Air, the organization has for decades fought and succeeded in snuffing out similar efforts in radio. It's most notable victory came over the licensing of low-fi radio stations, which would have given thousands of amateurs, low-budget operators and undiscovered talent access to the airwaves.

More recently, traditional broadcasters were given huge swaths of spectrum (the invisible grid over which radio, TV, and cellular signals travel) for the development of High Definition TV — for free. Most everyone else who wants a slice of spectrum is required to pay for it. Yet broadcasters got theirs for free, leaving those interests pursuing similar technology (wi-fi and cellular providers, to name two) to fight for the scraps. It's hard to say exactly what innovations and technology that grant may have quashed. We'll never know because they were never given the chance to develop.

Which brings us to the NAB's latest fight — against satellite radio. About a decade ago, XM and Sirius approached the FCC to bid on satellite spectrum. Wary of the NAB and its Washington chest-thumping prowess, XM agreed that in exchange for a slice of spectrum, it would not offer the kind of localized programming that would put it in direct competition with terrestrial broadcasters.

Put another way, XM subscribers in Los Angeles would hear the same stuff as XM subscribers in Portland, Dallas, or Poughkeepsie. With a titan like NAB standing in the door, this gentleman's agreement was really the only way an upstart like XM could have gotten into the game.

Fast forward 10 years. Today, XM and Sirius have finally caught fire. Both have subscribers that number well into the millions, most of them disaffected refugees from FM radio. And both companies now want to offer localized content. XM wants to give customers in major metropolitan areas instant traffic and weather reports. Sirius is offering audio feeds of NFL games, and may delve into traffic and weather as well.

As you might guess, the National Association of Broadcasters will have none of it.

NAB's position is a precarious one. Satellite radio has taken off because traditional broadcast radio is so darned dreadful. That means the NAB is forced to argue that the government must prevent satellite providers from offering localized programming because allowing them to do so might drive local broadcasters out of business. But at the same time, NAB must argue that the service local broadcasters currently provide is of high enough quality to merit that kind of protection in the first place. It's an absurd case on its face. If FM and AM radio broadcasters were really giving consumers worthwhile local content, they wouldn't need government protection from XM and Sirius.

Even odder, just as NAB is fighting XM and Sirius over local content, many of the stations NAB represents are turning away from localized programming, running cheaper, syndicated content from parent companies like ClearChannel and Infinity.

I've asked representatives of NAB how using the power of the FCC to keep out competitors could possibly benefit radio consumers. They always respond the same way. "That's not the issue," they say, "the issue is that XM is backing down from its agreement." Perhaps. But it's awfully telling that they won't even address the real question.

The fight is a classic case of what economists call "regulatory capture" — when an industry that's regulated by a government agency attempts to use that very agency and those regulations to keep upstarts and competitors at bay. And it's almost always to the detriment of consumers.

The good news is that it looks likes NAB is going to lose this time. XM has already begun offering traffic and weather, pending action by Congress and/or the FCC. And more local programming may be on the way. That may drive a few traditional radio stations out of business. But it will also ensure that those that survive will do a better job of giving you the kind of programming you want.

Which is sort of the whole point of a free market.

Radley Balko publishes a weblog at: www.TheAgitator.com.


(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News
KEYWORDS: satellite; satelliteradio; sirius; talkradio; xm
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I still haven't taken the plunge into satellite radio, Just waiting for the market to develop a bit, I guess.
1 posted on 07/03/2004 6:11:22 PM PDT by ovrtaxt
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To: ovrtaxt
Even odder, just as NAB is fighting XM and Sirius over local content, many of the stations NAB represents are turning away from localized programming, running cheaper, syndicated content from parent companies like ClearChannel and Infinity.

I hate that. Now, deregulation is a good thing, giving corporations the ability to own as many stations as they want. But their use of the NAB lobby to stifle smaller companies is totally unethical. Apparently, they're playing both sides of the issue. Very low class.

2 posted on 07/03/2004 6:14:43 PM PDT by ovrtaxt (Don't worry -- moderate Islam will save us!)
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To: ovrtaxt

I had my first experience with XM radio a few months ago when it was included in a rental car I was driving. It was great -- radio the way it used to be before the accountants ran it -- obscure songs, lots of variety, no ads. I highly recommend it.


3 posted on 07/03/2004 6:22:51 PM PDT by speedy
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To: speedy

That's a good idea-- maybe I'll rent a car with it and try it a while. I just don't feel like making a big investment on something that may not be worth it.


4 posted on 07/03/2004 6:24:46 PM PDT by ovrtaxt (Don't worry -- moderate Islam will save us!)
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To: ovrtaxt
Hmmm...I'm gonna' have to look into an XM or Sirius subscription.
That might be a nice way to strike a blow against the NAB.

Is there anything such as a Walkman-style personal XM/Sirius receiver available?
Or are XM/Sirius users pretty well restricted to use in vehicles or home?
5 posted on 07/03/2004 6:25:29 PM PDT by VOA
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To: ovrtaxt

The good news is it isn't even much of an investment. I think you can get started for as little as about $125, and subscription is around ten bucks a month. Try it for a weekend in a car rental. If you enjoy lots of variety in music, I think you will like it.


6 posted on 07/03/2004 6:27:03 PM PDT by speedy
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To: ovrtaxt
I still haven't taken the plunge into satellite radio

Nor have I. But it's worthless to get a car with a radio anymore. Nothing but ads. Though my latest car has a cd player which I use quite often.

7 posted on 07/03/2004 6:29:14 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (In God We Trust. All Others We Monitor.)
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To: speedy
Today I was at a Tweeter and talking to them about satellite radio. I'm about to take the plunge.

I was exposed to XM radio a short while ago. The variety of music is phenomenal but what I really like is the fact that the XM device will display the artist and title of the song playing. This is something I've been waiting for all my life. I cannot tell you how aggravated I get when you finally hear a decent song on the radio and then the DJ fails to "back-announce" the song so that you are left guessing as to who the song was done by.

I've since gotten past that because I learned that you can type a verse of just about any song into Google and come up with that information. But it's still so much more convenient to see the artist and song title displayed on your radio as it is being played.

What's more is that you are not limited to your car anymore. Both XM and Sirius offer portable players that can receive the signal so you can now play satellite radio in your home or in your backyard.

Now I have to decide between XM and Sirius because they both have their pros and cons.

8 posted on 07/03/2004 6:34:47 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (Manos - The Hands Of Fate)
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To: ovrtaxt
I'd seriously consider XM radio if Limbaugh was on one of the services. Rush talked about it a couple weeks ago on his program, and there were business/contract reasons why he said he couldn't - i.e. the distribution channels are at each other's throats.

So, I have Rush 24x7 and it works fine for me.

9 posted on 07/03/2004 6:37:20 PM PDT by Bosco (Remember how you felt on September 11?)
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To: SamAdams76

Totally agree with you on radio stations that never mention artist or title, as if you are supposed to automatically know who you just heard. From what I've seen, XM and Sirius offer pretty similar packages. XM seemed to go a little deeper into old Rock and R&B, two things I like, so I lean toward them, plus XM also offered more of a variety of jazz, which also counts for me. But there is plenty to go around on both systems. To me, it's kind of like the early days of the internet -- wide open, unregimented and lots of variety. Good luck on your search, Sam.


10 posted on 07/03/2004 6:43:56 PM PDT by speedy
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To: Bosco

Bosco -- you don't have to give up your AM/FM to get satellite. It's just an add-on. So you can still have Rush.


11 posted on 07/03/2004 6:45:03 PM PDT by speedy
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To: ovrtaxt
XM has over 2 million subscribers and Sirius has (I think) over 300,000. I subscribe to XM, but have had rentals with Sirius. Obviously, I like XM better than Sirius, but they are both so far above what is offered on AM and FM that I would never be without satellite radio.

Both services offer commercial-free music and there is something for everyones musical tastes. Like Opera? There is a channel that plays only opera. Like Reggae? XM has an all reggae channel. Like folk music? XM has an all folk music channel. Like rap? Are you nuts??? ;-)

Sirius plays more of the songs you might recognize, while XM goes deeper into an artists catalog. Both have numerous news and talk channels (those do have some commercials) such as Fox News, CNN, ABC News, BBC, etc.

IMHO, you can't go wrong with either service.

12 posted on 07/03/2004 6:46:02 PM PDT by TopDog2 (XM Satellite Radio - What are you waiting for?)
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To: ovrtaxt
you'd have no FOX News, no Comedy Central, and no HBO

Since there would be no CNN this would be a zero loss.

13 posted on 07/03/2004 6:48:52 PM PDT by freedumb2003 (I want to die in my sleep like Gramps -- not yelling and screaming like those in his car)
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To: ovrtaxt

I forgot to mention -- you can get a free three-day trial of XM radio off of its website -- I think it's just xmradio.com, but whatever, a quick google will get you there. Not as good as listening on the radio, because you can't switch stations as quickly, so that part gets annoying. But it will give you an idea of what they are playing.


14 posted on 07/03/2004 6:49:16 PM PDT by speedy
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To: ovrtaxt

I love my XM radio. Wouldn't leave home without it. (But I own stock in Sirius, mainly because I was too late to get in on XM).


15 posted on 07/03/2004 6:54:36 PM PDT by LS (CNN is the Amtrak of news.)
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To: Bosco

I have a usb computer version in the house and a Roady in the car. I love it. If there is a big story breaking on fox and I have to go somewhere then I turn it on in the car. Awesome. And no commercials on the music channels (there are commercials on the tv channels but are generally self-promotion)

I'll never forget the day I got the XM. I was in my car listening to Rush on the local am channel. Suddenly, Rush was cut and the Red Sox pre-game started. Although this was nothing new because the same station had consolidated two am stations into one, it was never announced ahead of time. Then, during the first commercial break, the am station had a self promotion on how one should stay away from satellite radio and all the supposed downfalls. I yelled out, "How about the downside when you are listening to a show that discusses real issues and all of sudden...gone?!" I love the sox but because the local station tried to put all their eggs in one basket, now some of their loyal listeners would have Rush cut short almost every other day. I was pissed.

It was right then that I decided to get one for the car too. I've got Rush 24/7 so I now listen to Laura Ingraham's show then Rush later. It's awesome


16 posted on 07/03/2004 6:55:57 PM PDT by torchthemummy (Florida 2000: There Would Have Been No 5-4 Without A 7-2)
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To: SamAdams76

"The variety of music is phenomenal but what I really like is the fact that the XM device will display the artist and title of the song playing."

So true!!! I forgot that one. Plus there is an old time radio station, cspan, discovery.


17 posted on 07/03/2004 6:57:19 PM PDT by torchthemummy (Florida 2000: There Would Have Been No 5-4 Without A 7-2)
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To: speedy

Radio was/is ruined by Clear Channel and the other corporate giants. It has become nothing but a series of highly coordinated commercials with a little music or talk mixed in here and there. Contests are no longer local, the music is all the same, and the DJs all read from the same playbook.

I don't think I'm alone in these gripes. XM and Sirus should have no problem carving out a niche of frustrated land station listeners.


18 posted on 07/03/2004 6:57:37 PM PDT by pickemuphere
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To: ovrtaxt
More recently, traditional broadcasters were given huge swaths of spectrum (the invisible grid over which radio, TV, and cellular signals travel) for the development of High Definition TV — for free.

Welfare for the well connected.

19 posted on 07/03/2004 7:04:03 PM PDT by secretagent
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To: speedy
Oh - I'm aware of the technical side of XM and AM/FM.

One of the few things that keeps me on broadcast is Limbaugh, but even then the local affiliate for the program does a delay broadcast starting at 1pm Eastern.

Seems that there's oh-so-much going on in central Ohio that they devote an hour to covering all of it

That and AM radio gets eaten up by the steel in the building I work in so I listen/watch Limbaugh live over the internet w/o the commercials.

Musically I don't listen to much on the FM side - my musical tastes are extreme - currently listening to Irish traditional and looking at an XM radio channel listing there isn't anything close to that.

20 posted on 07/03/2004 7:04:30 PM PDT by Bosco (Remember how you felt on September 11?)
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To: pickemuphere

My sentiments exactly, pick. Oh for the days before syndication, when every single station on the dial had its own individual and distinctive personality. The problems started with the Top 40 concept, which limited playlists, and grew increasingly worse to the point that no DJ above the college station level has any say on what they can play. I have hoped for years that at some point the public would rebel against this restrictive policy, and satellite radio offers our chance.


21 posted on 07/03/2004 7:05:27 PM PDT by speedy
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To: Bosco

You're right on that one, Bosco, I don't recall much in the way of traditional European music on either XM or Sirius. As one who also likes certain kinds of music that are well off the charts, I sympathize, and understand there is a point where CDs are the only solution.


22 posted on 07/03/2004 7:09:41 PM PDT by speedy
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To: ovrtaxt
Another alternative is Internet Radio--there are many streaming broadcasts of various kinds of music--many commercial free.

The broadcasters, like the recording industry better wise up. People do not want to listen to the homogenized no talent pap played on top 40 radio and will willingly seek other alternatives. Does anyone seriously want to listen to Madonna's latest trash or Britanny's no talent bubblegum pop or howling DJ's with mindless contests and trash talk?

23 posted on 07/03/2004 7:11:20 PM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: ovrtaxt
So the FCC can censor 1st Amendment content? I find it hard to believe that the authority to license transmissions gave them the power to prohibit you from saying "traffic on the I-9 is jammed up from Farkle Street to Garvle Boulevard." It seems to me there's a speech limitation here.
24 posted on 07/03/2004 7:17:17 PM PDT by atomicpossum (I give up! Entropy, you win!)
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To: LS

I have had Sirius for about 4 months and love it. I'm in my car from 3-8 hours a day and have Fox News, cnn, bbc, etc.,local weather/traffic and any kind of music you want to hear. Now I can leave the house in the morning when something big is happening in the news and pick it up in the car without missing anything. I can't get Rush, but I can catch Laura Ingraham on delay on the TalkRight channel, as well as other talk radio shows. I can tune to Rush on my local A.M. station, so all is right with the world. (excuse the pun) I highly recommend it.


25 posted on 07/03/2004 7:23:08 PM PDT by toomanygrasshoppers ("Hold on to your hats.....it's going to be a bumpy night")
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To: ovrtaxt
Even odder, just as NAB is fighting XM and Sirius over local content, many of the stations NAB represents are turning away from localized programming, running cheaper, syndicated content from parent companies like ClearChannel and Infinity.

These Clearchannel stations clog the air waves with zero-depth. ex-DJ nitwit, talk show hosts like Sean Hannity and Glenn Beck. What ever happened to local talk shows?

26 posted on 07/03/2004 7:36:49 PM PDT by StockAyatollah
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To: StockAyatollah
What ever happened to local talk shows?

KFI640 (Los Angeles) -- they bcst Rish and Dr. Laura, other than that pretty much 100% local -- and funny and very, very good.

27 posted on 07/03/2004 7:38:46 PM PDT by freedumb2003 (I want to die in my sleep like Gramps -- not yelling and screaming like those in his car)
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To: freedumb2003
I have had XM for a year and a half love it.I drive 40,000 miles a year.I am 100% news and talk. When I am in South Ga.and can't pick up anything but FM I can get Laura Ingram or listen to fox news.Around Atlanta in the afternoon I can switch between Ingram on xm and Rush and O'Reilly on AM.If I have to go some where at 6PM I can listen to Fox News with Brit and then Crissy on MSNBC at 7PM.At 8PM you have John Bachelor on ABC radio.If things get boring their is always Cspan and the comedy channels.I only wish they had live sports events and that MSNBC could broadcast Imus in the mornings.
28 posted on 07/03/2004 7:54:47 PM PDT by Blessed
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To: ovrtaxt

I've had XM radio for almost 2 years now and I can't live without it. The morning FM radio in my area is all fluff-talk with maybe 2 or 3 songs an hour! And half the talk is syndicated! XM is continuous music - no DJ or commercials. THey also carry the audio feed from Fox News. It was great to hear O'Reilly and H&C when I was in Canada where no-one knew who they were (except now I have the reputation of being a right wing nut for listening to Fox). THe local broadcasters are now running commercials about how many people dropped satellite radio becasue the FM and AM was better. To me, this is a sound of desperation for the traditional broadcasters.


29 posted on 07/03/2004 8:02:00 PM PDT by doc30
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To: All
I have had XM for about three months and love it as well. Right now, I just have it at work via a boombox (like you might have seen in the XM commercials). I plan on eventully getting it going in the car and at home as well.

I would highly recommend it to anyone.
30 posted on 07/03/2004 8:29:53 PM PDT by Methos8
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To: Methos8
I have Sirius and I love it too! I got it after my regular am station pulled the Conservative local guy and put on stupid Imus!
31 posted on 07/03/2004 8:35:04 PM PDT by Empireoftheatom48 (God bless our troops!! Our President and those who fight against the awful commie, liberal left!!)
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To: StockAyatollah
What ever happened to local talk shows?

We have a local morning talk show. Real guests too. And, of course, the loser Congressmen that we have.

The local CC talkstation (AM/FM pair) has Imus.

I like shortwave. Lots of variety, but mostly limited in broadcast times, and you do have to sort through all the faux
religious broadcasts, bad "world music", etc.

32 posted on 07/03/2004 8:44:56 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: freedumb2003

I've had XM for 3 years and have it in the house and 3 cars for $15 a month AND it has FOX News Channel live, so if you're on the road, you don't have to miss your regular programs. You can listen to one station from coast to coast if you like.


33 posted on 07/03/2004 10:14:29 PM PDT by tinamina
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To: ovrtaxt

Trust me. It's worth it. Go talk to anyone who's got it. They'll tell you the same.


34 posted on 07/03/2004 10:18:46 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (hoplophobia is a mental aberration rather than a mere attitude)
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To: FreedomPoster

I had a chance to drive a couple days with XM equipped vehicles. Awesome in LA traffic!!! It was amazing!


35 posted on 07/03/2004 11:09:46 PM PDT by BurbankKarl
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To: BurbankKarl

Regular FM radio is pretty much totally unlistenable for me. I love XM.

Another bonus - the right wing talk radio station they have now, has Laura Ingram, who wasn't available on any of the local broadcast stations.


36 posted on 07/03/2004 11:18:15 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (hoplophobia is a mental aberration rather than a mere attitude)
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To: ovrtaxt

I'd rather listen to silence, than pay for radio....


37 posted on 07/03/2004 11:20:47 PM PDT by Joe Hadenuf (I failed anger management class, they decided to give me a passing grade anyway)
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To: speedy

I'm big on talk radio and sports. Does the XM provide these channels?


38 posted on 07/03/2004 11:52:15 PM PDT by ChiMark
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To: speedy
The problems started with the Top 40 concept, which limited playlists, and grew increasingly worse to the point that no DJ above the college station level has any say on what they can play.

I remember being a kid, hearing the DJ say something like 'the new such-and-such album hit the stores today-- here's side 2.' After it was over, they would play a block of commercials.

Remember the king biscuit flour hour? GREAT live music! sigh...

I almost exclusively listen to AM these days, but even then, the commercials get overwhelming. Plus, in Tampa, we only really have 2 news/talk channels. the 3 to 6 pm slots are a total wasteland on both, so I actually end up listening to sports talk.

If it's anything like the digital music on my cable service, I will probably get it soon.

39 posted on 07/04/2004 3:40:46 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (Don't worry -- moderate Islam will save us!)
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To: Blessed

Thanks for the input. Thats one of my concerns, the availability of talk radio. I see listings like BBC radio or CNN and oh, please. That's the last thing I want to subject myself to. But if they have real, live call-in talk radio, with good hosts, that's a different story. Seems to me XM and Sirius could both benefit from at least one dedicated channel for talk radio only.


40 posted on 07/04/2004 3:46:52 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (Don't worry -- moderate Islam will save us!)
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To: Calvin Locke
I like shortwave. Lots of variety, but mostly limited in broadcast times, and you do have to sort through all the faux religious broadcasts, bad "world music", etc.

I remember hearing some CRAZY stuff on shortwave several years ago. Super far-out survivalist/armageddon stuff, bizarro ultra-right wing conspiracy theories.

Funny, Michael Moore is just as far out there, and he's in movie theatres. How bad is that?

41 posted on 07/04/2004 3:53:01 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (Don't worry -- moderate Islam will save us!)
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To: ovrtaxt
Don't take my XM, right now on the Decades they are running the greatest hits of the 20th century, they started on Thursday with 1930, music, news of the day, sports of the day and other happenings during the year, they are somewhere in 1945 now and won't switch to the 50's until Monday morning. It won't end till 1999 sometime near the end of the July.

I'm amazed at the recordings they dug up. Rudy Vallee, Eddy Duchin (war hero) Harry James, The Dorseys, Goodman, Artie Shaw, Bing before he was hot, Kate Smith, early, early Sinatra with Dorsey before he was hot, the war music, polkas, Welk , theme songs, Mills Brothers, Duke, Ella, Bob Hope singing his them from a 30's recording. It's all here. OMG this is fun.

Since we got XM about a month ago it's been on 24/7 at the house and it's not only "old" music. Deep album cuts, disco, real jazz, smooth jazz, fusion, funk jazz, the blues, bluegrass, newgrass, classical, full symphonies, full operas and lots of symphonic pops, crooners, loungers, pop rock, everything, all for 10 bucks a month.

Who needs local programming except for weather and news?

42 posted on 07/04/2004 4:11:55 AM PDT by this_ol_patriot
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To: this_ol_patriot

I purchased a Sirius system for my husband's vehicle for Christmas last year. We usually drive to California to visit my family over the holidays. It was wonderful to have driving farom IA to CA as there are vast expanses in the lower Midwest and Southwest with bad reception. Plus I got my fix of FNC while alternating between the jazz and blues channels and sports channels. It made the long drive much more enjoyable.


43 posted on 07/04/2004 4:34:55 AM PDT by babaloo
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To: Joe Hadenuf
I'd rather listen to silence, than pay for radio....

I pay for the music I download, and I have paid for XM for almost two years.

I travel by car, to NM, AZ, NC, and live full-time near DC, in the panhandle of WV. I average driving more than 1000 miles per week. I got tired of turning off the radio due to losing stations...

In NM, you can get 2 or 3 radio stations nearby enough to listen. They love to play hispanic/country music. I like Rock and Roll, and love to listen to talkers...

With XM, I can even go into the Baltimore tunnels, and continue to listen, I can drive out I-40 to NM, or AZ, and listen, or I can go out into the Atlantic, off Morehead City, in my boat, and listen...even 40-50 miles out... to the same channels! I never have 'fade' any more, except when trying to get the local weather!

...the music never stops!

BTW, the cicadas are finally gone for the next 17 years, and now we DO have (relative) silence again, in the hills of WV, for a while!

44 posted on 07/04/2004 4:40:06 AM PDT by pageonetoo (Rights, what Rights'. You're kidding, right? This is Amerika!)
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To: ChiMark

I know that on XM, besides all the programs listed here, they have "America Right" and "America Left" right next to each other on the dial, which feature a variety of political talk programming -- I wasn't familiar with the hosts I was listening to. XM also has ESPN radio. I was so focused on the music aspect, though, that I didn't pay as much attention to the talk stuff as I should have.


45 posted on 07/04/2004 4:56:27 AM PDT by speedy
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To: VOA

Probably the closest thing right now is the recently introduced Delphi Roady 2, an iPod sized receiver that includes an FM transmitter. You would have to bundle it with a traditional Walkman-like product.


46 posted on 07/04/2004 5:04:58 AM PDT by I_dmc
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To: The Great RJ

Internet radio is a valid point here. There is a great deal of interest from manufacturers in delivering Internet-On-The-Road.


47 posted on 07/04/2004 5:15:09 AM PDT by I_dmc
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To: ovrtaxt

Yeah, it was a lot more fun listening to the musical taste of individual DJs than to a computerized, inflexible list of songs (not only telling you what to play, but what order to play it in) coming down from the Program Director. Like you said about albums, back in the 60s the jock would sometimes even flip the single over just to hear what the B side sounded like. Or you could get a taste of local bands.

I know of King Biscuit Flour Hour, but never actually heard it. I do remember as a kid hearing the live broadcasts of the Grand Ole Opry, which I enjoyed even though I was more interested in rock and roll. In those days, the lines between musical genres were more blurred anyway, so that some of the artists who you heard on regular rock radio would also be appearing on the Grand Ole Opry. People like Skeeter Davis or Sonny James or Bobby Bare or Conway Twitty were being played on the same station that was playing The Four Seasons or James Brown or Gene Pitney. Music was not as fragmented. It would not have been at all unusual to have "She Loves You" by The Beatles followed by "Hello Dolly" by Louis Armstrong. It certainly exposed us to lots of different music!!


48 posted on 07/04/2004 5:17:52 AM PDT by speedy
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To: I_dmc

And, of course, there'd be the problem of the required antenna. You'd problably wind up with something similar to the previously mentioned boombox.


49 posted on 07/04/2004 5:19:22 AM PDT by I_dmc
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To: speedy
Used to listen to the King Biscuit Flower Hour every week.  Sigh.  Many FM stations in those days had a regularly scheduled time when they'd broadcast a recorded concert or live album (hint hint, wink wink). ;-)  For Doors fans, Robbie Krieger has put together a CD collection called "Boot Yer Butt" with the best of the bootlegs. It was these type of recordings of live concerts that use to be broadcast, unofficially, of course.  see:

http://www.thedoors.com/bmr/boot.html

50 posted on 07/04/2004 5:28:01 AM PDT by I_dmc
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