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The True Story of The Patton Prayer
The Patton Society ^ | 6 October 1971 | Msgr. James H. O'Neill

Posted on 07/19/2004 5:04:30 PM PDT by flowerjoyfun

The True Story of The Patton Prayer
by Msgr. James H. O'Neill
(From the Review of the News 6 October 1971)

Many conflicting and some untrue stories have been printed about General George S. Patton and the Third Army Prayer. Some have had the tinge of blasphemy and disrespect for the Deity. Even in "War As I Knew It" by General Patton, the footnote on the Prayer by Colonel Paul D. Harkins, Patton's Deputy Chief of Staff, while containing the elements of a funny story about the General and his Chaplain, is not the true account of the prayer Incident or its sequence.
As the Chief Chaplain of the Third Army throughout the five campaigns on the Staff of General Patton, I should have some knowledge of the event because at the direction of General Patton I composed the now world famous Prayer, and wrote Training Letter No. 5, which constitutes an integral, but untold part, of the prayer story. These Incidents, narrated in sequence, should serve to enhance the memory of the man himself, and cause him to be enshrined by generations to come as one of the greatest of our soldiers. He had all the traits of military leadership, fortified by genuine trust in God, intense love of country, and high faith In the American soldier.
He had no use for half-measures. He wrote this line a few days before his death: "Anyone in any walk of life who is content with mediocrity is untrue to himself and to American tradition." He was true to the principles of his religion, Episcopalian, and was regular in Church attendance and practices, unless duty made his presence Impossible.
The incident of the now famous Patton Prayer commenced with a telephone call to the Third Army Chaplain on the morning of December 8, 1944, when the Third Army Headquarters were located in the Caserne Molifor in Nancy, France: "This is General Patton; do you have a good prayer for weather? We must do something about those rains if we are to win the war." My reply was that I know where to look for such a prayer, that I would locate, and report within the hour. As I hung up the telephone receiver, about eleven in the morning, I looked out on the steadily falling rain, "immoderate" I would call it -- the same rain that had plagued Patton's Army throughout the Moselle and Saar Campaigns from September until now, December 8. The few prayer books at hand contained no formal prayer on weather that might prove acceptable to the Army Commander. Keeping his immediate objective in mind, I typed an original and an improved copy on a 5" x 3" filing card:
Almighty and most merciful Father, we humbly beseech Thee, of Thy great goodness, to restrain these immoderate rains with which we have had to contend. Grant us fair weather for Battle. Graciously hearken to us as soldiers who call upon Thee that, armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies and establish Thy justice among men and nations.
I pondered the question, What use would General Patton make of the prayer? Surely not for private devotion. If he intended it for circulation to chaplains or others, with Christmas not far removed, it might he proper to type the Army Commander's Christmas Greetings on the reverse side. This would please the recipient, and anything that pleased the men I knew would please him:
To each officer and soldier in the Third United States Army, I Wish a Merry Christmas. I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty, and skill in battle. We march in our might to complete victory. May God's blessings rest upon each of you on this Christmas Day. G.S. Patton, Jr, Lieutenant General, Commanding, Third United States Army.
This done, I donned my heavy trench coat, crossed the quadrangle of the old French military barracks, and reported to General Patton. He read the prayer copy, returned it to me with a very casual directive, "Have 250,000 copies printed and see to it that every man in the Third Army gets one." The size of the order amazed me; this was certainly doing something about the weather in a big way. But I said nothing but the usual, "Very well, Sir!" Recovering, I invited his attention to the reverse side containing the Christmas Greeting, with his name and rank typed. "Very good," he said, with a smile of approval. "If the General would sign the card, it would add a personal touch that I am sure the men would like." He took his place at his desk, signed the card, returned it to me and then Said: "Chaplain, sit down for a moment; I want to talk to you about this business of prayer." He rubbed his face in his hands, was silent for a moment, then rose and walked over to the high window, and stood there with his back toward me as he looked out on the falling rain. As usual, he was dressed stunningly, and his six-foot-two powerfully built physique made an unforgettable silhouette against the great window. The General Patton I saw there was the Army Commander to whom the welfare of the men under him was a matter of Personal responsibility . Even in the heat of combat he could take time out to direct new methods to prevent trench feet, to see to it that dry socks went forward daily with the rations to troops on the line, to kneel in the mud administering morphine and caring for a wounded soldier until the ambulance Came. What was coming now?
" Chaplain, how much praying is being done in the Third Army?" was his question. I parried: "Does the General mean by chaplains, or by the men?" "By everybody," he replied. To this I countered: "I am afraid to admit it, but I do not believe that much praying is going on. When there Is fighting, everyone prays, but now with this constant rain -- when things are quiet, dangerously quiet, men just sit and wait for things to happen. Prayer out here is difficult. Both chaplains and men are removed from a special building with a steeple. Prayer to most of them is a formal, ritualized affair, involving special posture and a liturgical setting. I do not believe that much praying is being done."
The General left the window, and again seated himself at his desk, leaned back in his swivel chair, toying with a long lead pencil between his index fingers.
Chaplain, I am a strong believer in Prayer. There are three ways that men get what they want; by planning, by working, and by Praying. Any great military operation takes careful planning, or thinking. Then you must have well-trained troops to carry it out: that's working. But between the plan and the operation there is always an unknown. That unknown spells defeat or victory, success or failure. It is the reaction of the actors to the ordeal when it actually comes. Some people call that getting the breaks; I call it God. God has His part, or margin in everything, That's where prayer comes in. Up to now, in the Third Army, God has been very good to us. We have never retreated; we have suffered no defeats, no famine, no epidemics. This is because a lot of people back home are praying for us. We were lucky in Africa, in Sicily, and in Italy. Simply because people prayed. But we have to pray for ourselves, too. A good soldier is not made merely by making him think and work. There is something in every soldier that goes deeper than thinking or working--it's his "guts." It is something that he has built in there: it is a world of truth and power that is higher than himself. Great living is not all output of thought and work. A man has to have intake as well. I don't know what you it, but I call it Religion, Prayer, or God.
He talked about Gideon in the Bible, said that men should pray no matter where they were, in church or out of it, that if they did not pray, sooner or later they would "crack up." To all this I commented agreement, that one of the major training objectives of my office was to help soldiers recover and make their lives effective in this third realm, prayer. It would do no harm to re-impress this training on chaplains. We had about 486 chaplains in the Third Army at that time, representing 32 denominations. Once the Third Army had become operational, my mode of contact with the chaplains had been chiefly through Training Letters issued from time to time to the Chaplains in the four corps and the 22 to 26 divisions comprising the Third Army. Each treated of a variety of subjects of corrective or training value to a chaplain working with troops in the field. [Patton continued:]
I wish you would put out a Training Letter on this subject of Prayer to all the chaplains; write about nothing else, just the importance of prayer. Let me see it before you send it. We've got to get not only the chaplains but every man in the Third Army to pray. We must ask God to stop these rains. These rains are that margin that hold defeat or victory. If we all pray, it will be like what Dr. Carrel said [the allusion was to a press quote some days previously when Dr. Alexis Carrel, one of the foremost scientists, described prayer "as one of the most powerful forms of energy man can generate"], it will be like plugging in on a current whose source is in Heaven. I believe that prayer completes that circuit. It is power.
With that the General arose from his chair, a sign that the interview was ended. I returned to my field desk, typed Training Letter No. 5 while the "copy" was "hot," touching on some or all of the General's reverie on Prayer, and after staff processing, presented it to General Patton on the next day. The General read it and without change directed that it be circulated not only to the 486 chaplains, but to every organization commander down to and including the regimental level. Three thousand two hundred copies were distributed to every unit in the Third Army over my signature as Third Army Chaplain. Strictly speaking, it was the Army Commander's letter, not mine. Due to the fact that the order came directly from General Patton, distribution was completed on December 11 and 12 in advance of its date line, December 14, 1944. Titled "Training Letter No. 5," with the salutary "Chaplains of the Third Army," the letter continued: "At this stage of the operations I would call upon the chaplains and the men of the Third United States Army to focus their attention on the importance of prayer.
" Our glorious march from the Normandy Beach across France to where we stand, before and beyond the Siegfried Line, with the wreckage of the German Army behind us should convince the most skeptical soldier that God has ridden with our banner. Pestilence and famine have not touched us. We have continued in unity of purpose. We have had no quitters; and our leadership has been masterful. The Third Army has no roster of Retreats. None of Defeats. We have no memory of a lost battle to hand on to our children from this great campaign.
" But we are not stopping at the Siegfried Line. Tough days may be ahead of us before we eat our rations in the Chancellery of the Deutsches Reich.
" As chaplains it is our business to pray. We preach its importance. We urge its practice. But the time is now to intensify our faith in prayer, not alone with ourselves, but with every believing man, Protestant, Catholic, Jew, or Christian in the ranks of the Third United States Army.
" Those who pray do more for the world than those who fight; and if the world goes from bad to worse, it is because there are more battles than prayers. 'Hands lifted up,' said Bosuet, 'smash more battalions than hands that strike.' Gideon of Bible fame was least in his father's house. He came from Israel's smallest tribe. But he was a mighty man of valor. His strength lay not in his military might, but in his recognition of God's proper claims upon his life. He reduced his Army from thirty-two thousand to three hundred men lest the people of Israel would think that their valor had saved them. We have no intention to reduce our vast striking force. But we must urge, instruct, and indoctrinate every fighting man to pray as well as fight. In Gideon's day, and in our own, spiritually alert minorities carry the burdens and bring the victories.
" Urge all of your men to pray, not alone in church, but everywhere. Pray when driving. Pray when fighting. Pray alone. Pray with others. Pray by night and pray by day. Pray for the cessation of immoderate rains, for good weather for Battle. Pray for the defeat of our wicked enemy whose banner is injustice and whose good is oppression. Pray for victory. Pray for our Army, and Pray for Peace.
" We must march together, all out for God. The soldier who 'cracks up' does not need sympathy or comfort as much as he needs strength. We are not trying to make the best of these days. It is our job to make the most of them. Now is not the time to follow God from 'afar off.' This Army needs the assurance and the faith that God is with us. With prayer, we cannot fail.
" Be assured that this message on prayer has the approval, the encouragement, and the enthusiastic support of the Third United States Army Commander.
" With every good wish to each of you for a very Happy Christmas, and my personal congratulations for your splendid and courageous work since landing on the beach, I am," etc., etc., signed The Third Army Commander.
The timing of the Prayer story is important: let us rearrange the dates: the "Prayer Conference" with General Patton was 8 December; the 664th Engineer Topographical Company, at the order of Colonel David H. Tulley, C.E., Assistant to the Third Army Engineer, working night and day reproduced 250,000 copies of the Prayer Card; the Adjutant General, Colonel Robert S. Cummings, supervised the distribution of both the Prayer Cards and Training Letter No. 5 to reach the troops by December 12-14. The breakthrough was on December 16 in the First Army Zone when the Germans crept out of the Schnee Eifel Forest in the midst of heavy rains, thick fogs, and swirling ground mists that muffled sound, blotted out the sun, and reduced visibility to a few yards. The few divisions on the Luxembourg frontier were surprised and brushed aside. They found it hard to fight an enemy they could neither see nor hear. For three days it looked to the jubilant Nazis as if their desperate gamble would succeed. They had achieved compete surprise. Their Sixth Panzer Army, rejuvenated in secret after its debacle in France, seared through the Ardennes like a hot knife through butter. The First Army's VIII Corps was holding this area with three infantry divisions (one of them new and in the line only a few days) thinly disposed over an 88-mile front and with one armored division far to the rear, in reserve. The VIII Corps had been in the sector for months. It was considered a semi-rest area and outside of a little patrolling was wholly an inactive position.
When the blow struck the VIII Corps fought with imperishable heroism. The Germans were slowed down but the Corps was too shattered to stop them with its remnants. Meanwhile, to the north, the Fifth Panzer Army was slugging through another powerful prong along the vulnerable boundary between the VIII and VI Corps. Had the bad weather continued there is no telling how far the Germans might have advanced. On the 19th of December, the Third Army turned from East to North to meet the attack. As General Patton rushed his divisions north from the Saar Valley to the relief of the beleaguered Bastogne, the prayer was answered. On December 20, to the consternation of the Germans and the delight of the American forecasters who were equally surprised at the turn-about-the rains and the fogs ceased. For the better part of a week came bright clear skies and perfect flying weather. Our planes came over by tens, hundreds, and thousands. They knocked out hundreds of tanks, killed thousands of enemy troops in the Bastogne salient, and harried the enemy as he valiantly tried to bring up reinforcements. The 101st Airborne, with the 4th, 9th, and 10th Armored Divisions, which saved Bastogne, and other divisions which assisted so valiantly in driving the Germans home, will testify to the great support rendered by our air forces. General Patton prayed for fair weather for Battle. He got it.
It was late in January of 1945 when I saw the Army Commander again. This was in the city of Luxembourg. He stood directly in front of me, smiled: "Well, Padre, our prayers worked. I knew they would." Then he cracked me on the side of my steel helmet with his riding crop. That was his way of saying, "Well done."
(This article appeared as a government document in 1950. At the time it appeared in the Review of the News, Msgr. O'Neill was a retired Brigadier General living in Pueblo, Colorado.)


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: 3rdarmy; bastogne; generalgeorgepatton; generalpatton; georgepatton; georgespatton; luxembourg; nazis; patton; prayer; reincarnation; thirdarmy; worldwareleven; zionist
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It is so important that President Bush is reelected. Those who are for Kerry will stop at nothing; they are not interested in truth, the protection of America and the freedom, which we enjoy. Anti Bush people are only interested in reacquiring power for their own personal enjoyment and exploitation. For such a situation General Patton has some terrific and proven advice, "There are three ways that men get what they want; by planning, by working, and by Praying. Any great military operation takes careful planning, or thinking. Then you must have well-trained troops to carry it out: that's working. But between the plan and the operation there is always an unknown. That unknown spells defeat or victory, success or failure. It is the reaction of the actors to the ordeal when it actually comes. Some people call that getting the breaks; I call it God. God has His part, or margin in everything, That's where prayer comes in."
1 posted on 07/19/2004 5:04:31 PM PDT by flowerjoyfun
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To: flowerjoyfun
"In Gideon's day, and in our own, spiritually alert minorities carry the burdens and bring the victories."

The same is true today.

2 posted on 07/19/2004 5:11:26 PM PDT by My2Cents ("Fair, balanced...and unafraid.")
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To: flowerjoyfun
And he was also known for his poetry:

Through a Glass, Darkly
General George Patton


Through the travail of the ages,
Midst the pomp and toil of war,
Have I fought and strove and perished
Countless times upon this star.

In the form of many people
In all panoplies of time
Have I seen the luring vision
Of the Victory Maid, sublime.

I have battled for fresh mammoth,
I have warred for pastures new,
I have listed to the whispers
When the race trek instinct grew.

I have known the call to battle
In each changeless changing shape
From the high souled voice of conscience
To the beastly lust for rape.

I have sinned and I have suffered,
Played the hero and the knave;
Fought for belly, shame, or country,
And for each have found a grave.

I cannot name my battles
For the visions are not clear,
Yet, I see the twisted faces
And I feel the rending spear.

Perhaps I stabbed our Savior
In His sacred helpless side.
Yet, I've called His name in blessing
When after times I died.

In the dimness of the shadows
Where we hairy heathens warred,
I can taste in thought the lifeblood;
We used teeth before the sword.

While in later clearer vision
I can sense the coppery sweat,
Feel the pikes grow wet and slippery
When our Phalanx, Cyrus met.

Hear the rattle of the harness
Where the Persian darts bounced clear,
See their chariots wheel in panic
From the Hoplite's leveled spear.

See the goal grow monthly longer,
Reaching for the walls of Tyre.
Hear the crash of tons of granite,
Smell the quenchless eastern fire.

Still more clearly as a Roman,
Can I see the Legion close,
As our third rank moved in forward
And the short sword found our foes.

Once again I feel the anguish
Of that blistering treeless plain
When the Parthian showered death bolts,
And our discipline was in vain.

I remember all the suffering
Of those arrows in my neck.
Yet, I stabbed a grinning savage
As I died upon my back.

Once again I smell the heat sparks
When my Flemish plate gave way
And the lance ripped through my entrails
As on Crecy's field I lay.

In the windless, blinding stillness
Of the glittering tropic sea
I can see the bubbles rising
Where we set the captives free.

Midst the spume of half a tempest
I have heard the bulwarks go
When the crashing, point blank round shot
Sent destruction to our foe.

I have fought with gun and cutlass
On the red and slippery deck
With all Hell aflame within me
And a rope around my neck.

And still later as a General
Have I galloped with Murat
When we laughed at death and numbers
Trusting in the Emperor's Star.

Till at last our star faded,
And we shouted to our doom
Where the sunken road of Ohein
Closed us in it's quivering gloom.

So but now with Tanks a'clatter
Have I waddled on the foe
Belching death at twenty paces,
By the star shell's ghastly glow.

So as through a glass, and darkly
The age long strife I see
Where I fought in many guises,
Many names, but always me.

And I see not in my blindness
What the objects were I wrought,
But as God rules o'er our bickerings
It was through His will I fought.

So forever in the future,
Shall I battle as of yore,
Dying to be born a fighter,
But to die again, once more.

3 posted on 07/19/2004 5:53:12 PM PDT by theDentist ("John Kerry changes positions more often than a Nevada prostitute.")
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To: flowerjoyfun

Lord, hear our prayer.President Bush is a man who is unafraid to admit his dependence on Your Divine Power.

Our times are in Your Hands. We ask You to bless our efforts to reelect a man who is not ashamed of You, rather than to see a man come to power that is ashamed to protect the ones who are the most innocent amongst us, and who will not uphold Your principles for society, such as marriage between one man and one woman.

We have seen throughout our 228 year history as a nation that You have divinely ordained this country to be a light for freedom and for spreading the Gospel to the world. In our great and longterm abundance, we have forgotten the source of our strength and protection. We humbly ask for Your forgiveness, and for Your blessings to once again bring our land to a new level of righteousness and brotherhood.

With thanks for Your help in times past, and with our dependence on Your help for the times to come, we put ourselves in Your Hands to guide us. In the name of Jesus, who is above all names, we ask these things. Amen.



4 posted on 07/19/2004 5:54:45 PM PDT by exit82 (Righteousness exalts a nation......Prov. 14:34)
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To: flowerjoyfun
Then he cracked me on the side of my steel helmet with his riding crop. That was his way of saying, "Well done."

Not a girlie-man. Dems take note.

5 posted on 07/19/2004 6:01:58 PM PDT by ClearCase_guy (The Fourth Estate is a Fifth Column)
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To: theDentist; flowerjoyfun; thatcher; antonia
There is much anecdotal evidence which indicates that General George Patton held himself to be the reincarnation of the Carthaginian General Hannibal; a Roman legionnaire; a Napoleonic field marshal; and various other historic military figures. Through a Glass, Darkly seems to describe those experiences.
6 posted on 07/19/2004 6:10:36 PM PDT by Beau Schott (Mother nature has a way of taking care of the weak... you hesitate and the lion eats you.)
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To: ClearCase_guy; firebrand; #1CTYankee; .303 Brit; 2nd amendment mama; 2Trievers; AGBRUHN; ...
We don't want no girlie-guys here.
7 posted on 07/19/2004 6:44:09 PM PDT by antonia ("Democracy is the worst type of government, excepting all others." ~ Churchill)
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To: antonia; 2ndMostConservativeBrdMember; afraidfortherepublic; Alas; al_c; american colleen; ...


8 posted on 07/19/2004 7:10:04 PM PDT by Coleus (Abraham Lincoln was a trial lawyer.)
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To: Beau Schott

"There is much anecdotal evidence which indicates that General George Patton held himself to be the reincarnation of the Carthaginian General Hannibal; a Roman legionnaire; a Napoleonic field marshal; and various other historic military figures. Through a Glass, Darkly seems to describe those experiences."

I am glad you raised the issue of reincarnation. I agree with you that Patton's poem seems to reflect his belief in reincarnation. However, I am pretty sure that reincarnation is not an episcopalian belief. Apparently Patton differed with them at least on this point.

Either that or Patton's belief in reincarnation is just another one of those urban legends, so to speak.


9 posted on 07/19/2004 7:15:01 PM PDT by fizziwig
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To: flowerjoyfun
My Grandfather who was in Europe in WWII once told my Daddy that both Patton and Montgomery were devout Christians.

I think Grandpa was unusual because he liked Montgomery. He said he was a "preacher's kid".

10 posted on 07/19/2004 7:15:33 PM PDT by Shanda
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To: Coleus; 11th Earl of Mar; Alas; alloysteel; ambrose; Angel; AngieGOP; anniegetyourgun; antonia; ...
Let's Roll!

President Bush Addresses Prayer Service

September 14, 2001 Posted: 1:28 PM EDT (1728 GMT)

President Bush addressed a prayer service on Friday at the Washington National Cathedral. Here is a transcript of his comments:

We are here in the middle hour of our grief. So many have suffered so great a loss, and today we express our nation's sorrow. We come before God to pray for the missing and the dead, and for those who loved them.

On Tuesday, our country was attacked with deliberate and massive cruelty. We have seen the images of fire and ashes and bent steel.

Now come the names, the list of casualties we are only beginning. They are the names of men and women who began their day at a desk or in an airport, busy with life. They are the names of people who faced death and in their last moments called home to say, be brave and I love you.

They are the names of passengers who defied their murderers and prevented the murder of others on the ground. They are the names of men and women who wore the uniform of the United States and died at their posts.

They are the names of rescuers -- the ones whom death found running up the stairs and into the fires to help others. We will read all these names. We will linger over them and learn their stories, and many Americans will weep.

To the children and parents and spouses and families and friends of the lost, we offer the deepest sympathy of the nation. And I assure you, you are not alone.

Just three days removed from these events, Americans do not yet have the distance of history, but our responsibility to history is already clear: to answer these attacks and rid the world of evil.

War has been waged against us by stealth and deceit and murder.

This nation is peaceful, but fierce when stirred to anger. This conflict was begun on the timing and terms of others; it will end in a way and at an hour of our choosing.

Our purpose as a nation is firm, yet our wounds as a people are recent and unhealed and lead us to pray. In many of our prayers this week, there's a searching and an honesty. At St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York, on Tuesday, a woman said, "I pray to God to give us a sign that he's still here."

Others have prayed for the same, searching hospital to hospital, carrying pictures of those still missing.

God's signs are not always the ones we look for. We learn in tragedy that his purposes are not always our own, yet the prayers of private suffering, whether in our homes or in this great cathedral are known and heard and understood.

There are prayers that help us last through the day or endure the night. There are prayers of friends and strangers that give us strength for the journey, and there are prayers that yield our will to a will greater than our own.

This world He created is of moral design. Grief and tragedy and hatred are only for a time. Goodness, remembrance and love have no end, and the Lord of life holds all who die and all who mourn.

It is said that adversity introduces us to ourselves.

This is true of a nation as well. In this trial, we have been reminded and the world has seen that our fellow Americans are generous and kind, resourceful and brave.

We see our national character in rescuers working past exhaustion, in long lines of blood donors, in thousands of citizens who have asked to work and serve in any way possible. And we have seen our national character in eloquent acts of sacrifice. Inside the World Trade Center, one man who could have saved himself stayed until the end and at the side of his quadriplegic friend. A beloved priest died giving the last rites to a firefighter. Two office workers, finding a disabled stranger, carried her down 68 floors to safety.

A group of men drove through the night from Dallas to Washington to bring skin grafts for burned victims. In these acts and many others, Americans showed a deep commitment to one another and in an abiding love for our country.

Today, we feel what Franklin Roosevelt called, "the warm courage of national unity." This is a unity of every faith and every background. This has joined together political parties and both houses of Congress. It is evident in services of prayer and candlelight vigils and American flags, which are displayed in pride and waved in defiance. Our unity is a kinship of grief and a steadfast resolve to prevail against our enemies. And this unity against terror is now extending across the world.

America is a nation full of good fortune, with so much to be grateful for, but we are not spared from suffering. In every generation, the world has produced enemies of human freedom. They have attacked America because we are freedom's home and defender, and the commitment of our fathers is now the calling of our time.

On this national day of prayer and remembrance, we ask almighty God to watch over our nation and grant us patience and resolve in all that is to come. We pray that He will comfort and console those who now walk in sorrow. We thank Him for each life we now must mourn, and the promise of a life to come.

As we've been assured, neither death nor life nor angels nor principalities, nor powers nor things present nor things to come nor height nor depth can separate us from God's love.

May He bless the souls of the departed. May He comfort our own. And may He always guide our country.

God bless America.

11 posted on 07/19/2004 7:29:58 PM PDT by daisymeme (Money often costs too much, when we make money to spend time.)
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To: daisymeme

Thanks for the ping.


12 posted on 07/19/2004 7:36:07 PM PDT by petitfour
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To: daisymeme

Beautiful post daisymeme!!


13 posted on 07/19/2004 7:37:38 PM PDT by potlatch (HECK IS WHERE PEOPLE GO WHO DON'T BELIEVE IN GOSH)
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To: daisymeme
Thanks for the ping.

GOD BLESS AMERICA.

14 posted on 07/19/2004 7:39:13 PM PDT by Pharmboy (History's greatest agent for freedom: The US Armed Forces)
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To: fizziwig
I've read a couple of books on Patton. Patton was a strong Christian, but also a believer in certain types of mysticism, and from the readings, I believe there is ample evidence that he believed in reincarnation, and that he believed he was reincarnated in a line of warriors. His daughter claimed that on the night he died in Europe, that she woke up about 2 AM in her bedroom in the US and saw him sitting at her window sill in his uniform. I am not saying this actually happened, but that his daughter recounted it as being true.

One thing to remember about the movie Patton is that although it was accurate in many areas, the primary adviser to the movie was Omar Bradley (played by Karl Mauldin in the movie), and was based on Bradley's autobiography, A Soldier's Story. Bradley, according to several accounts I've read, was jealous of the fact most people in the US perceived Patton as being the Allies best general. This was supposedly exacerbated by the fact that when the Allies recovered Nazi documents, the documents revealed little fear of Bradley or Montgomery, but considered Patton a military genius.

While the movie Patton is a terrific piece of work, and with a few exceptions historically accurate by Hollywood standards, it should be remembered that the chief adviser to the movie chose to portray himself as the calming hand on Patton, and that some of Patton's eccentricities were exaggerated

15 posted on 07/19/2004 7:50:04 PM PDT by Richard Kimball (To expect the government to save you is to be a bystander in your own fate.)
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To: flowerjoyfun

Thanks for a terrific post.


16 posted on 07/19/2004 7:52:40 PM PDT by Richard Kimball (To expect the government to save you is to be a bystander in your own fate.)
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To: fizziwig; flowerjoyfun; daisymeme; thatcher
  The Many Incarnations of George S. Patton

Captain George s. Patton had never before visited Langres, a small town in northeastern France. But in December 1917, having just arrived to operate a tank school, the american newcomer declined the offer of a local liaison officer to show him around the town, once the site of a Roman military camp. "You don't have to," Patton told the surprised young man, "I know it well."

A staunch believer in reincarnation, Patton felt sure that he had been to France before-- as a Roman legionnaire. As he led the way trhough the area, he pointed out the sites of the ancient Roman temples and amphitheater, the drill ground, and the forum, even showeing a spot where Julius Caesar had made his camp. It was, Patton later told his nephew, :As if someone were at my ear whispering the directions,:

Patton may have credited his continuing military success, in part, to having been a soldier in other battles, in past lives. Once, in North Africa during World war ll, a British general complimented Patton: "You would have made a great marshal for Napoleon if you'd lived in the eighteenth century." Patton merely grinned, " But I did," he replied.

 

  There is still reference to reincarnation in the Old Testament. In the year 325 AD the Roman emperor Constantine the great, along with his mother Helena, had deleted references to reincarnation contained in the New Testament. The second council of Constantinople, meeting in the year 553 AD, confirmed this action and declared the concept of reincarnation a heresy (unorthodoxy).

Solomon the son of David, king of Jerusalem speaking in the Old Testament Ecclesiastes wrote:

Ecc 1:9   The thing that hath been, it [is that] which shall be; and that which is done [is] that which shall be done: and [there is] no new [thing] under the sun.

Ecc 1:10   Is there [any] thing whereof it may be said, See, this [is] new? it hath been already of old time, which was before us.

Ecc 1:11   [There is] no remembrance of former [things]; neither shall there be [any] remembrance of [things] that are to come with [those] that shall come after.

And in the New Testament we have these possible examples:

Mat 22:32  I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob? God is not the God of the dead , but of the living.

Mar 12:27  He is not the God of the dead , but the God of the living : ye therefore do greatly err.

Luk 20:38  For he is not a God of the dead , but of the living : for all live unto him.

17 posted on 07/19/2004 8:36:34 PM PDT by Beau Schott (Mother nature has a way of taking care of the weak... you hesitate and the lion eats you.)
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To: exit82
Lord, hear our prayer.  President Bush is a man who is unafraid to admit his dependence on Your Divine Power.

Our times are in Your Hands. We ask You to bless our efforts to reelect a man who is not ashamed of You, rather than to see a man come to power that is ashamed to protect the ones who are the most innocent amongst us, and who will not uphold Your principles for society, such as marriage between one man and one woman.

We have seen throughout our 228 year history as a nation that You have divinely ordained this country to be a light for freedom and for spreading the Gospel to the world. In our great and longterm abundance, we have forgotten the source of our strength and protection. We humbly ask for Your forgiveness, and for Your blessings to once again bring our land to a new level of righteousness and brotherhood.

With thanks for Your help in times past, and with our dependence on Your help for the times to come, we put ourselves in Your Hands to guide us. In the name of Jesus, who is above all names, we ask these things. Amen.

Amen!

Thanks exit82 for the very fine prayer.

 

18 posted on 07/19/2004 8:41:00 PM PDT by Beau Schott (Mother nature has a way of taking care of the weak... you hesitate and the lion eats you.)
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To: daisymeme; SJackson; yonif; Simcha7; American in Israel; spectacularbid2003; Binyamin; ...
"...In Gideon's day, and in our own, spiritually alert minorities carry the burdens and bring the victories."

Thanks much for the 'Ping' on this one. This is a great piece of Patton history. How very, very relevant to today. That one quote reminded me of the men and women of Free Republic.


AMERICA AT WAR
At Salem the Soldier's Homepage ~

American Flag

19 posted on 07/19/2004 8:47:21 PM PDT by Salem (FREE REPUBLIC - Fighting to win within the Arena of the War of Ideas! So get in the fight!)
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To: Salem

Hello Salem...

Just a quick note to let you know that I do appreciate everything you are sending! Ping away!


20 posted on 07/19/2004 8:55:48 PM PDT by JudyinCanada
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