Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries
Xinhua News/China.org ^ | 7-27-2004

Posted on 07/27/2004 11:23:06 AM PDT by blam

Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries

More than 80 leading archeological experts are participating in an international conference in Chifeng, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, to exchange the latest information on Hongshan, a prehistoric relics site.

Relics excavated at the Hongshan ("Red Mountain") site originated around 5000 BC to 6500 BC. Now a part of Chifeng City, the site was discovered in 1935.

Some of the relics found at Hongshan have led archeologists to conclude that the heads of Chinese dragons may have been inspired by boars in addition to horses and cattle.

Primitive people who struggled to survive by fishing and hunting developed the tradition of dragon worship. They revered important food sources such as pigs, deer, birds and snakes, said Tian Guanglin, an archeologist with Liaoning Normal University.

The dragon image coalesced into animal-head and snake-body in the Hongshan cultural period and remained unchanged until the Han dynasty, nearly 4,000 years later. Dragon images from Hongshan are the earliest standard image of dragons discovered in China, said Tian.

The largest and most vivid discovery is a jade boar-head dragon about 26 centimeters long and bent like the letter "C." It has a snake's body and a boar's head with a tight-lipped snout and bulging eyes, said Liu Guoxiang, an archeologist with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS).

Many bones from swine were found buried with human remains at Hongshan sites, indicating that the pig had become an important animal in that culture. It may have symbolized prosperity, said Sarah M. Nelson, an archeologist with the University of Denver in the United States.

Chinese dragon worship in the prehistoric age varied by region: the boar-head dragon in northern China, the snake-head-human-body dragon in central China and the crocodile-head dragon in eastern China.

Also a focus of discussion at the conference is a recent discovery concerning the nearby Xiaohexi site. It has now been determined to be some 8,500 years old, the earliest prehistoric civilization site discovered in China's northeast. This latest findings make it about 300 years older than archeologists formerly believed.

The Xiaohexi site was discovered in 1987 at Aohan Banner in Inner Mongolia. The area contained smaller primitive villages, with buildings constructed partly underground. The residents had learned how to polish stone tools, according to Liu Guoxiang with the Research Institute of Archeology under the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences.

"The mystery of the Neolithic Xiaohexi culture has begun to be solved. Although only three of the sites have been unearthed, more than 300 artifacts -- including various pottery mugs and vases as well as bone and stone utensils -- have been discovered," Liu said.

The artifacts include a five-centimeter tall clay rendering of a human face. The earliest of its kind in the northeastern region, it might have been used for worship, Liu reckoned.

Typical stone tools at the Xiaohexi site included tools with holes or indentations at the center. The designs have seldom been seen in Neolithic cultures in elsewhere in China.

"Only tests and experiments can explain the use of these stone tools, as different scratches would be left by wood and meat cutting and mud digging," said Yan Wenming of Peking University. Wang is also the vice chairman of the China Archeology Society.

The six-day Chifeng conference, jointly sponsored by CASS, the municipal government of Chifeng and Chifeng College, will end on Friday.

(Xinhua News Agency July 27, 2004)


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: adriennemayor; animalhead; aohan; archaeology; archeological; archeologist; archeologists; boarhead; chifeng; china; chinese; crocodilehead; denver; discoveries; dragon; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; guanglin; guoxiang; han; history; hongshan; inner; jade; liaoning; liu; mongolia; neolithic; new; peking; pottery; prehistoric; tian; wang; wenming; xiaohexi; xinhua; yan; yields

1 posted on 07/27/2004 11:23:08 AM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 07/27/2004 11:23:51 AM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
I did one of my industrial strength keyword jobs on this topic and the 8000 year old earring topic. :')
3 posted on 07/27/2004 11:20:05 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Unlike some people, I have a profile. Okay, maybe it's a little large...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; ...

· GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
 Excerpt, or Link only?
 


Note: this topic is from 7/27/2004.

It was added, but it never got pinged!

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
 

· History topic · history keyword · archaeology keyword · paleontology keyword ·
· Science topic · science keyword · Books/Literature topic · pages keyword ·


4 posted on 11/14/2010 7:27:50 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Absolutely fascinating. These dragons predate both the biblical references to dragons and the dragon on the Ishtar gate of Babylon. I wonder if these dragon images found in early Western culture draw upon these Eastern dragon concepts. Or did they spring up on their own?


5 posted on 11/14/2010 7:40:36 PM PST by worst-case scenario (Striving to reach the light)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
"Note: this topic is from 7/27/2004.

It was added, but it never got pinged!"

(ahem) I was meaning to speak with you about your pinging promptness but decided not to because you do eventually get to it. (Who knows, you may have been busy, six years ago!)

6 posted on 11/14/2010 8:04:31 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: worst-case scenario
"Absolutely fascinating. These dragons predate both the biblical references to dragons and the dragon on the Ishtar gate of Babylon. I wonder if these dragon images found in early Western culture draw upon these Eastern dragon concepts. Or did they spring up on their own?"

My bet is that they're linked.

7 posted on 11/14/2010 8:06:10 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: blam

You must have *loved* that nine year old one I pinged.


8 posted on 11/14/2010 9:01:34 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv
"You must have *loved* that nine year old one I pinged."

Yup.

I confess to laughing out loud when I see someone complain about responding to a 6-7-8 or 9 year old thread.

Those were the Good Old Days, huh?

9 posted on 11/14/2010 10:04:44 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: worst-case scenario; blam; SunkenCiv; All

I have often wondered to what extent the discovery of dinosaur bones in such places as Mongolia might have influenced various Chinese and other mythologies.

Also, these findings are from over 8,000 years ago. I have often wondered what the impact of the eruption of Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake) with all the ash from its 6 mile diameter caldera, might have had on developing civilizations in the period between 7 and 8,000 years ago when it erupted. You may remember the crazy weather we had in the years after Pinitubo which only left a 3 mile diameter calder. I would think a 6 mile diameter caldera would have dumped around 8 times as much ash into the upper atmosphere, and being in the northern hemisphere would have had a proportionately larger impact in China than Pinitube being much farther south might have.


10 posted on 11/14/2010 11:22:27 PM PST by gleeaikin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: gleeaikin

Adrienne Mayor discusses that in a book; the dragon myths are attributed to the Scythians, who’d picked it up directly or indirectly from fossil deposits in the region you mentioned. :’)

Greek Myths: Not Necessariliy Mythical
Source: New York Times
Published: 7/4/00 Author: John Noble Wilford
Posted on 07/07/2000 07:37:37 PDT by H.R. Gross
http://www.freerepublic.com/forum/a3965eb3163de.htm

‘Cyclops’-like remains found on Crete
CNN | Friday, January 31, 2003 Posted: 2:52 AM HKT (1852 GMT) | Editorial Staff
Posted on 02/01/2003 11:07:21 AM PST by vannrox
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/833994/posts


11 posted on 11/15/2010 5:25:42 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: blam

I think I have revived a ten year old thread, but I could be wrong, that may antedate the new-style URL system here. Of course, some of those older topics got transferred into the new system with topic numbers in the 500,000s.


12 posted on 11/15/2010 5:27:30 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson