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Iranian Alert -- August 5, 2004 [EST]-- IRAN LIVE THREAD -- "Americans for Regime Change in Iran"
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.5.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/04/2004 9:00:57 PM PDT by DoctorZIn

The US media still largley ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” Most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. I began these daily threads June 10th 2003. On that date Iranians once again began taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Today in Iran, most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: alsadr; armyofmahdi; ayatollah; cleric; humanrights; iaea; insurgency; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; iraq; islamicrepublic; jayshalmahdi; journalist; kazemi; khamenei; khatami; khatemi; moqtadaalsadr; mullahs; persecution; persia; persian; politicalprisoners; poop; protests; rafsanjani; revolutionaryguard; rumsfeld; satellitetelephones; shiite; southasia; southwestasia; studentmovement; studentprotest; terrorism; terrorists; wot
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 08/04/2004 9:00:58 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ronin; dubyaismypresident; bert; glock rocks; BOBTHENAILER; Dog Gone; js1138; blam; MEG33; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 08/04/2004 9:02:40 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Enriching uranium is Iran’s legitimate right: Kharazi

TEHRAN: Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi asserted on Wednesday that Iran had a "legitimate right" to enrich uranium.

"We will lobby for our rights in the international community to deal with the negative atmosphere our enemies have created against Iran and we will never allow the enemy to trample upon our legitimate rights enshrined in the international conventions," Kamal Kharazi was quoted as saying.

Britain, France and Germany have been pressing Iran to cease working on the nuclear fuel cycle in exchange for increased trade and cooperation and guaranteed supply of nuclear fuel from abroad. Such work is permitted under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), but the concern is that once fully mastered, a country possessing such technology can easily divert it into military usage, the European Union’s big three argue.

Iran has agreed to temporarily suspend enrichment pending the completion of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) probe, but continues working on other parts of the fuel cycle and has recently resumed making centrifuges used for enrichment.

There was no substantial progress in the recent talks in Paris between Iran and the three European nations, who made efforts to restrict the Iranian nuclear activities. Kharazi insisted: "Iran would not stop enriching uranium, since enrichment is our legitimate right. Still we will continue negotiations with the European countries, the International Atomic Energy Agency and members of Non-Aligned Movement (NAM)." He said Iran needs nuclear energy to go ahead with its economic development plan. He added, "We will not allow the Iranian file to be referred to the Security Council."

http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2004-daily/05-08-2004/main/main19.htm


3 posted on 08/04/2004 9:03:44 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran is No Surprise

August 04, 2004
Intellectual Conservative
Michael D. Evans

The much-anticipated 9/11 Commission report has now been released, and details evidence that eight to ten of the September 11 high-jackers passed through Iran a year prior to the attack on the United States.

The New York Times reports that Iranian officials have instructed border guards on Iran’s western border with Afghanistan not to stamp the passports of Saudi citizens who may have been traveling to and from al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan. An Iranian stamp in a passport would have caused closer scrutiny by U.S. immigration officials.

Is this really a surprise? Iran has harbored, financed, and cooperated with terrorists who have attacked the “Great Satan” since June 1985, when the United States began an embargo against Iran because of its sponsorship of international terrorism. These sanctions have been in place for more than a decade, now, squeezing the Iran economy, which suffers from inflation running as high as fifty percent.

Iran has been working day and night to stir up trouble throughout the Gulf region. Hezbollah factions have been infiltrated, and the seeds of a tremendous explosion on the world scene have been sown.

The world was shocked when Israel captured the Palestinian ship, the Katrine-A, in the Red Sea on January 4, 2002. The ship was loaded with Katyusha rockets with a maximum range of twelve miles, assault rifles, anti-tank missiles, mines, ammunition and explosives. Most of the weapons were Iranian.

The truth is that Iran was flying up to three jumbo jets laden with military supplies to Syria each month. The majority of the supplies were being ferried directly to Hezbollah guerillas for the war against Israel. At the same time, the Clinton administration was socializing with Syrian president, Bashar Assad.

On November 13, 1995, an Iranian-backed Islamic organization known as the Movement for Islamic Change claimed responsibility for the bombing of the Saudi National Guard at Riyadh, in which five American servicemen and two Indian workers were killed. This was the first of two promised attacks. On June 3, 1996, Iran vowed to resist the embargo imposed by the U.S., and then on June 9, Iran’s spiritual leader called for Iran’s military to prepare for war.

Ten days later, the U.S. House of Representatives cast a unanimous vote in favor of imposing tighter sanctions on Iran. The principle was added to pending legislation. The intent of the bill was to cripple Iran’s and Libya’s ability to continue their support of international terrorism. A week later, on June 20-23, Teheran hosted an international terrorism conference during which it was announced that attacks against U.S. interests would be stepped up in the coming months.

Two days later, on June 25, the truck bombing of the military housing camp in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, took place, claiming the lives of nineteen U.S. airmen and wounding hundreds of others. The Islamic Movement for Change, which had already claimed credit for the Riyadh bombing, took credit for this attack as well.

On July 16, the United States levied its version of sanctions against Iran and Libya. On the following day, July 17, the Movement for Islamic Change sent a chilling fax to the London-based Arab newspaper, Al-Hayat, warning:

The world will be astonished and amazed at the time and place chosen by the Mujahadin. The Mujahadin will deliver the harshest reply to the threats of the American president. Everyone will be surprised by the volume, choice of place, and timing of the answer. The invaders must be prepared to depart…dead, for their time of mourning is near.

That fax, intercepted by overseas operatives, was forwarded to U.S. agencies.

Mike Evans is a Middle East analyst, a New York Times bestselling author, and the author of The American Prophecies.

http://www.intellectualconservative.com/article3662.html


4 posted on 08/04/2004 9:03:49 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Khatami: Democracy Only Way to Secure Iran

August 04, 2004
Middle East Online
middle-east-online.com

TEHRAN -- Iran's reformist President Mohammad Khatami, increasingly isolated following the ouster of his allies from parliament, launched a fresh attack on his hardline rivals Wednesday by urging them to respect democratic values.

"The more laws and regulations are overlooked, the more the country will be prone to aggression by the enemy," the president was quoted as saying by the state news agency IRNA.

The prevention of an "enemy" attack " can only be materialised through free elections, freedom of expression, being open to criticism, law abidance by the authorities and respecting the citizen's and human rights," he said.

"Power cannot be achieved without reliance upon public opinion," added the embattled president, speaking during a constitution conference in the northwestern city of Tabriz.

Khatami, whose second and final term in office ends in June 2005, has become increasingly frustrated in his bid to deliver "Islamic democracy" to Iran due to opposition from his more powerful hardline rivals.

Conservatives here wield their power through political oversight bodies, the courts, state media and the security forces.

Khatami's allies in parliament were ousted after the Guardians Council, an unelected political watchdog, barred most reformists from contesting February's polls.

http://www.middle-east-online.com/english/?id=10863


5 posted on 08/04/2004 9:04:18 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iraqi defence minister accuses Iran
of fuelling the fire in his country

KUWAIT CITY: Iraq’s defence minister has accused Iran of promoting the violence in his country, saying that Iran should not be using his country to ‘’settle its scores’’ with America.

In an interview published in Wednesday’s Al-Anba, Defence Minister Hazem Shaalan accused certain neighbouring states of a lack of concern for Iraq’s predicament as a land struggling to be reborn from the poverty and destruction left by the war that toppled dictator Saddam Hussein. ‘’Some of the neighbours did not care about this. They added fuel to the fire, "Shaalan said. Asked if he meant Iran, the defence minister said: "Yes, it is Iran.

I have said it before ... and I say Iran, Iran, Iran.’’ It was the second time in two months that Shaalan has blamed Iran for the insecurity in Iraq. Last month he said Iran was Iraq’s "first enemy" because it was playing a role in the insurgency.

Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi later distanced his government from the remark. On Saturday, Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi rejected Shaalan’s remark, saying that "from the outset Iran has tried to help Iraq overcome its problems."

In his latest remarks, made during a weekend visit to Kuwait, Shaalan said Iran was trying to "create an imbalance in the (Iraqi) population in a way that would serve them in elections and other matters." The minister did not elaborate, but he seemed to be referring to the return of Iraqis expelled by Saddam in the 1970s because they were allegedly of Iranian origin. "I hope Iran listens to my words ... and considers them," Shaalan said. "If Iran has scores to settle with America, and it settles them on Iraqi soil, this is not a humane operation," he added.

Iraqi and US officials have accused Iran and Syria of failing to stop fighters from crossing their borders with Iraq to engage the US-led multinational forces. Iran and Syria deny they allow fighters to cross into Iraq, but say they cannot maintain absolute control over their long frontiers. Iraqi Human Rights Minister Bakhtiyar Amin said on July 12 that his government had 99 foreign fighters in detention, including 26 Syrians, 14 Saudis, 14 Iranians, 12 Egyptians, and small numbers of nine other nationalities.

Iran, a Shiite Muslim country with close ties to Iraq’s majority Shiite population is suspected of using money to influence the political field in Iraq. Tehran has denied this.

http://www.jang.com.pk/thenews/aug2004-daily/05-08-2004/world/w9.htm


6 posted on 08/04/2004 9:04:20 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran News
Iran Denies Reported US Letter Sent to Khatami

Aug 4, 2004, 14:20

The United States has sent a letter to Iranian President Mohammed Khatami calling for better cooperation, according to media reports in Iran, but a foreign ministry spokesman said the reports were wrong.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan reportedly gave the letter to Khatami in a secret meeting on July 29 in Tehran, the press reports said. According to reports published in several Iranian dailies, the US called on Khatami in the "very important" letter to end the differences and start a new phase of cooperation.

The reports did not mention the letter's signatory. Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid-Reza Assefi said the reports were incorrect, according to Iranian Labor News Agency (ILNA). The Iranian press further quoted the secretary of the Supreme National Security Council (SNSC), Hassan Rohani, as saying that one day relations with the US would be resumed.

"We should be realistic in this regard as with the involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq, the US has de facto turned into one of our neighbors," said the conservative cleric, referring to Iran's long borders with the two states. Rohani further said the US has realized that settling the crisis in the region without Iranian assistance would be "quite impossible". "The end of the current presidential term (of George W. Bush) would be a suitable opportunity for new policies," said Rohani, who is widely regarded as one of the favorites to succeed Khatami in next year's presidential elections, Government spokesman Abdullah Ramezanzadeh however said last Monday that it would make no difference to Iran whether Bush or his Democratic challenger John Kerry wins the election in November.

Iran and the US have no diplomatic ties for almost a quarter of a century and all efforts to put an end to the hostilities have so far failed. Bush has branded Teheran as part of the "axis of evil" and Washington accuses the Islamic state of not only supporting the terrorist network Al Qaeda but also trying to acquire nuclear weapons. While denying the charges, Iran calls the US the "Great Satan" and main cause for all tensions in the Middle East and the Persian Gulf due to its unlimited support for Israel.

http://www.iranian.ws/iran_news/publish/printer_3184.shtml


7 posted on 08/04/2004 9:05:09 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Good for you DZ!


8 posted on 08/04/2004 9:05:44 PM PDT by Bob J (Rightalk.com...coming soon!)
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran News
Teachers Protest Continued Detention of Colleagues

Aug 2, 2004, 21:42



Teachers from different districts of Tehran protested the continued detention of two activists campaigning for teachers' welfare this Sunday.

About 70 protesters from different parts of Tehran staged a meeting in front of the Ministry of Education on Sunday calling for the immediate release of Mahmoud Beheshti Langroudi, Secretary General of Iran Teachers Association and Ali Asghar Zati, spokesman for the nationwide association.

The two teachers have been detained since July 10 on the charge of organizing teacher's rights demonstrations in late February. The protesters carried placards reading 'detained teachers should be set free', 'end discrimination' and 'The Two members of Teachers Association should be freed'.

"The way they deal with teachers is not right," said Mohammad Khaksari Member of the Iran Teachers Association Board of Directors. "Those putting pressure on teachers will get nothing... there is no justification for the detention of Mr. Beheshti and Mr. Zati. They should be released soon or their possible charge be examined by court of justice soon," Khaksari said.

http://www.iranian.ws/iran_news/publish/printer_3166.shtml


9 posted on 08/04/2004 9:06:11 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iraqi minister engages in war of words with Iran

Daily Star - Compiled by Staff
Aug 5, 2004

Engaged in a war of words with Iran, Iraqi Defense Minister Hazem al-Shaalan demanded, in remarks published Wednesday, that Tehran immediately return Iraqi planes entrusted to Iran ahead of the 1991 Gulf War.

Shaalan also said that former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein should be sentenced to death for his crimes in an interview with the Kuwait newspaper Al-Anbaa, which appeared as he arrived in Jordan to discuss "the latest developments in Iraq" with Jordanian Prime Minister Faisal al-Fayez.

"The 130 planes should be given back to Iraq now," Shaalan told the daily.

The figure is less than what Iraqi officials had previously asked Iran to return, namely 113 military and 33 civilian planes entrusted to Tehran by the former regime of Saddam Hussein on the eve of the 1991 Gulf War.

Tehran has insisted that it was holding only 22 Iraqi planes and that it was ready to return them if asked by the United Nations.

Shaalan also accused Iran of "attempting to sabotage the demographic structure of Iraq and to denaturalize its national identity."

In an interview with The Washington Post last week, Shaalan said he had seen "clear interference in Iraqi issues by Iran" and accused Tehran of taking over some Iraqi border posts and sending spies and saboteurs into Iraq.

He said former fighters in Afghanistan had been helped by Iran to get into Iraq and that Iran was supporting "terrorism and bringing enemies into Iraq."

Tehran rejected Shaalan's allegations on Tuesday, describing his statements as "contrary to the official message we get from Baghdad."

Despite lingering suspicions on both sides of the Iran-Iraq frontier, the interim government in Baghdad has talked of the possibility of establishing diplomatic ties with its neighbor.

Shaalan also told the daily that keeping Saddam alive was "very uncomforting for the victims of his crimes. ... Saddam should die, this is an unavoidable sentence," he said, referring to the trial of the former Iraqi leader who was ousted in a US-led military invasion last year.

Shaalan also said his government would request the extradition of senior members of the former Saddam regime residing abroad.

He said Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi had asked Syria to hand over "all corrupted elements who are on its territory." Shaalan said his government was specifically due to ask for the extradition of Mohammed al-Duri, the former Iraqi ambassador to the United Nations, and former Information Minister Mohammed Said al-Sahhaf.

There have been no reports of legal charges against the two former Baath party members who are thought to be residing in the UAE.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_7466.shtml


10 posted on 08/04/2004 9:06:34 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn
By the way, check out my updated News Blog!


11 posted on 08/04/2004 9:08:14 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot; Cyrus the Great; Persia; RunOnDiesel; faludeh_shirazi; democracy; Stefania; ..
Iranian-American Reza Torkzadeh is a strong Republican and strongly supports President Bush.

From ActivistChat:

LET'S PROMOTE A WONDERFUL YOUNG IRANIAN to speak at the Republican National Convention

Reza Torkzadeh (whom is one of our BEST and most dedicated young activist), has become a finalist in the MTV essay contest which offers him the opportunity to speak at the Republican National Convention (about Iran) IF he gets enough votes. The below links are the sites where you can vote; though the top link (the MTV link) is apparently the more important one. PLEASE send this out to everyone you know...we've got to send our boy to the Convention come hell or highwater. THIS is another chance for us all to show our solidarity.

http://www.mtv.com/chooseorlose/rnc_contest/

http://www.2004nycgop.com/reza/

Banafsheh

Personal Bio Born in 1979 in Tehran, Iran, Reza and his family had to flee the country amidst the Iranian Revolution to save their lives. While leaving the country, one of his uncles was executed by the governing regime because of his political beliefs and aspirations.


12 posted on 08/04/2004 9:09:17 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

Iraqi defense minister asks Iran to return planes "now"

KUWAIT, Aug 4 (AFP) - Iraqi Defense Minister Hazem al-Shaalan, engaged in a war of words with Iran, demanded in remarks published Wednesday that Tehran immediately return Iraqi planes entrusted to Iran ahead of the 1991 Gulf War.

"The 130 planes should be given back to Iraq now," Shaalan said in an interview with the Kuwaiti daily newspaper Al-Anbaa.
The figure is less than what Iraqi officials had previously asked Iran to return, namely 113 military and 33 civilian planes entrusted to Tehran by the former regime of Saddam Hussein on the eve of the 1991 Gulf War.

Tehran has insisted that it was holding only 22 Iraqi planes and that it was ready to return them if asked by the United Nations.
In 1991, Iraq also sent four planes to Tunisia and six to Jordan.

Shaalan also accused Iran of "attempting to sabotage the demographic structure of Iraq and to denaturalise its national identity."
In an interview with The Washington Post last week, Shaalan said he had seen "clear interference in Iraqi issues by Iran" and accused Tehran of taking over some Iraqi border posts and sending spies and saboteurs into Iraq.

He said former fighters in Afghanistan had been helped by Iran to get into Iraq and that Iran was supporting "terrorism and bringing enemies into Iraq".

Iran has consistently denied charges it has supported anti-US insurgents in Iraq, against which it fought a 1980-1988 war that killed an estimated one million people.

Tehran rejected Shaalan's allegations on Tuesday, describing his statements as "contrary to the official message we get from Baghdad".

Despite lingering suspicions on both sides of the Iran-Iraq frontier, the interim government in Baghdad has talked of the possibility of establishing diplomatic ties with its neighbour.

http://www.iranmania.com/news/040804c.asp


13 posted on 08/04/2004 9:10:17 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iranian editor released on bail a year after arrest

TEHRAN, Aug 3 (AFP) - An Iranian newspaper editor arrested more than a year ago for publishing a front-page photograph of banned opposition People's Mujahedeen leader Maryam Rajavi has been freed after paying a huge bail, his wife told AFP Tuesday.

Saghi Baghernia, the managing director and license holder of the Asia Financial Daily, said her husband Iraj Jamshidi -- the paper's editor-in-chief -- was released from north Tehran's notorious Evin prison.

The release came after she submitted the title deeds of her printing house to match the 4.5-billion-rial (517,000-dollar) bail.She said her husband was facing 11 charges, including propagating against the Islamic regime, relations with a foreign group and bribery.

In addition, he is also still facing charges related to the front-page photo of Rajavi that the paper carried last July and which initially landed him into trouble.

He has already paid bail of two billion rials (230,000 dollars) to go free on that charge.Jamshidi has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

According to the media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF), Jamshidi was kept in solitary confinement for more than 200 days during his 13 months behind bars, and was also barred from receiving visits from family or lawyers for several months.

The flamboyant editor sparked outrage last year when he used a wire agency photograph of Rajavi being freed on bail by a French court. It showed Rajavi smiling, clutching a bouquet of flowers and being cheered by delighted supporters.

The regime refers to the Mujahedeen, Iran's main armed opposition group, as "Monefeqin", or "hypocrites".

http://www.iranmania.com/news/040804a.asp


14 posted on 08/04/2004 9:11:18 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran is No Surprise
Intellectual Conservative - By Michael D. Evans
Aug 4, 2004


The much-anticipated 9/11 Commission report has now been released, and details evidence that eight to ten of the September 11 high-jackers passed through Iran a year prior to the attack on the United States.

The New York Times reports that Iranian officials have instructed border guards on Iran’s western border with Afghanistan not to stamp the passports of Saudi citizens who may have been traveling to and from al-Qaeda training camps in Afghanistan. An Iranian stamp in a passport would have caused closer scrutiny by U.S. immigration officials.

Is this really a surprise? Iran has harbored, financed, and cooperated with terrorists who have attacked the “Great Satan” since June 1985, when the United States began an embargo against Iran because of its sponsorship of international terrorism. These sanctions have been in place for more than a decade, now, squeezing the Iran economy, which suffers from inflation running as high as fifty percent.

Iran has been working day and night to stir up trouble throughout the Gulf region. Hezbollah factions have been infiltrated, and the seeds of a tremendous explosion on the world scene have been sown.

The world was shocked when Israel captured the Palestinian ship, the Katrine-A, in the Red Sea on January 4, 2002. The ship was loaded with Katyusha rockets with a maximum range of twelve miles, assault rifles, anti-tank missiles, mines, ammunition and explosives. Most of the weapons were Iranian.

The truth is that Iran was flying up to three jumbo jets laden with military supplies to Syria each month. The majority of the supplies were being ferried directly to Hezbollah guerillas for the war against Israel. At the same time, the Clinton administration was socializing with Syrian president, Bashar Assad.

On November 13, 1995, an Iranian-backed Islamic organization known as the Movement for Islamic Change claimed responsibility for the bombing of the Saudi National Guard at Riyadh, in which five American servicemen and two Indian workers were killed. This was the first of two promised attacks. On June 3, 1996, Iran vowed to resist the embargo imposed by the U.S., and then on June 9, Iran’s spiritual leader called for Iran’s military to prepare for war.

Ten days later, the U.S. House of Representatives cast a unanimous vote in favor of imposing tighter sanctions on Iran. The principle was added to pending legislation. The intent of the bill was to cripple Iran’s and Libya’s ability to continue their support of international terrorism. A week later, on June 20-23, Teheran hosted an international terrorism conference during which it was announced that attacks against U.S. interests would be stepped up in the coming months.

Two days later, on June 25, the truck bombing of the military housing camp in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, took place, claiming the lives of nineteen U.S. airmen and wounding hundreds of others. The Islamic Movement for Change, which had already claimed credit for the Riyadh bombing, took credit for this attack as well.

On July 16, the United States levied its version of sanctions against Iran and Libya. On the following day, July 17, the Movement for Islamic Change sent a chilling fax to the London-based Arab newspaper, Al-Hayat, warning:


The world will be astonished and amazed at the time and place chosen by the Mujahadin. The Mujahadin will deliver the harshest reply to the threats of the American president. Everyone will be surprised by the volume, choice of place, and timing of the answer. The invaders must be prepared to depart…dead, for their time of mourning is near.

That fax, intercepted by overseas operatives, was forwarded to U.S. agencies.

Mike Evans is a Middle East analyst, a New York Times bestselling author, and the author of The American Prophecies.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_7468.shtml


15 posted on 08/04/2004 9:12:36 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

Hey, Great!


16 posted on 08/04/2004 9:20:35 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: nuconvert; freedom44

Iran Denies Reported US Letter Sent to Khatami

Persian Journal
August 5th, 04

The United States has sent a letter to Iranian President Mohammed Khatami calling for better cooperation, according to media reports in Iran, but a foreign ministry spokesman said the reports were wrong.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan reportedly gave the letter to Khatami in a secret meeting on July 29 in Tehran, the press reports said. According to reports published in several Iranian dailies, the US called on Khatami in the "very important" letter to end the differences and start a new phase of cooperation.

The reports did not mention the letter's signatory. Iran's Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid-Reza Assefi said the reports were incorrect, according to Iranian Labor News Agency (ILNA). The Iranian press further quoted the secretary of the Supreme National Security Council (SNSC), Hassan Rohani, as saying that one day relations with the US would be resumed.

"We should be realistic in this regard as with the involvement in Afghanistan and Iraq, the US has de facto turned into one of our neighbors," said the conservative cleric, referring to Iran's long borders with the two states. Rohani further said the US has realized that settling the crisis in the region without Iranian assistance would be "quite impossible". "The end of the current presidential term (of George W. Bush) would be a suitable opportunity for new policies," said Rohani, who is widely regarded as one of the favorites to succeed Khatami in next year's presidential elections, Government spokesman Abdullah Ramezanzadeh however said last Monday that it would make no difference to Iran whether Bush or his Democratic challenger John Kerry wins the election in November.

Iran and the US have no diplomatic ties for almost a quarter of a century and all efforts to put an end to the hostilities have so far failed. Bush has branded Teheran as part of the "axis of evil" and Washington accuses the Islamic state of not only supporting the terrorist network Al Qaeda but also trying to acquire nuclear weapons. While denying the charges, Iran calls the US the "Great Satan" and main cause for all tensions in the Middle East and the Persian Gulf due to its unlimited support for Israel.

http://www.iranian.ws/iran_news/publish/article_3184.shtml


17 posted on 08/04/2004 9:48:20 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn

An American who died in Iran for freedom

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1185325/posts


18 posted on 08/04/2004 10:12:38 PM PDT by Khashayar
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To: freedom44
Iraqi defense minister asks Iran to return planes "now"

Iranians ask the Iraqis to return WHATEVER they stole from Iran during the 1980s war.

19 posted on 08/04/2004 10:49:10 PM PDT by Khashayar
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To: Khashayar

Iran sustains over $9B environmental damage in Persian Gulf war

http://www.payvand.com/news/04/aug/1035.html


20 posted on 08/05/2004 12:51:14 AM PDT by Khashayar
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To: DoctorZIn

Iraq Asks Iran to Return Planes

August 05, 2004
AFP
The Peninsula

KUWAIT -- Iraqi Defence Minister Hazem Al Shaalan, engaged in a war of words with Iran, demanded in remarks published yesterday that Tehran immediately return Iraqi planes entrusted to Iran ahead of the 1991 Gulf War.

“The 130 planes should be given back to Iraq now,” Shaalan said in an interview with the Kuwaiti daily newspaper Al Anbaa.

The figure is less than what Iraqi officials had previously asked Iran to return, namely 113 military and 33 civilian planes entrusted to Tehran by the former regime of Saddam Hussein on the eve of the 1991 Gulf War.

Tehran has insisted that it was holding only 22 Iraqi planes and that it was ready to return them if asked by the United Nations.

In 1991, Iraq also sent four planes to Tunisia and six to Jordan.

Shaalan also accused Iran of “attempting to sabotage the demographic structure of Iraq and to denaturalise its national identity.”

In an interview with The Washington Post last week, Shaalan said he had seen “clear interference in Iraqi issues by Iran” and accused Tehran of taking over some Iraqi border posts and sending spies and saboteurs into Iraq.

He said former fighters in Afghanistan had been helped by Iran to get into Iraq and that Iran was supporting “terrorism and bringing enemies into Iraq”.

Iran has consistently denied charges it has supported anti-US insurgents in Iraq, against which it fought a 1980-1988 war that killed an estimated one million people.

Tehran rejected Shaalan’s allegations on Tuesday, describing his statements as “contrary to the official message we get from Baghdad”.

Despite lingering suspicions on both sides of the Iran-Iraq frontier, the interim government in Baghdad has talked of the possibility of establishing diplomatic ties with its neighbour.

http://www.thepeninsulaqatar.com/Display_news.asp?section=World_News&subsection=Gulf%2C+Middle+East+%26+Africa&month=August2004&file=World_News20040805122325.xml


21 posted on 08/05/2004 8:55:22 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Saudi Cash Joins Forces with Nuclear Pakistan

August 04, 2004
The Financial Times
Roula Khalaf, Farhan Bokhari and Stephen Fidler

A week before Pakistan's maiden nuclear tests in May 1998, then prime minister Nawaz Sharif received a late night telephone call from a Saudi prince. India, Pakistan's arch-rival, had conducted nuclear tests that month and Mr Sharif was weighing the consequences of following suit.

As Mr Sharif told a hurriedly organised meeting of senior officials, the Saudi prince had offered to provide up to 50,000 barrels of oil a day to Pakistan for an indefinite period and on deferred payment terms. This would allow Pakistan to overcome the impact of punitive western sanctions expected to follow the tests.

According to a former aide to Mr Sharif, the message from Saudi Arabia, delivered on behalf of Crown Prince Abdullah, the de-facto ruler, had once again bailed out Pakistan at one of the most difficult moments in its history.

“It is possible that Pakistan may still have conducted its nuclear tests without the Saudi oil. But the tests would have been done with the knowledge that the economic fallout was going to be far more severe,” says the former aide to Mr Sharif.

The telephone call illustrated the intimacy between Saudi Arabia and Pakistan, a relationship that receives little international attention but has so far proved, for both sides, probably more profound and secure than any other.

A year after the tests, Prince Sultan, the Saudi defence minister, visited the uranium enrichment and missile assembly plant at Kahuta, then run by the now disgraced Pakistani scientist Abdul-Qadeer Khan. He thus became the first foreign official known to have visited a Pakistani nuclear research facility.

Saudi financial support has fuelled suspicions of nuclear co-operation between the two countries. A senior US official says Saudi finance helped fund Pakistan's nuclear programme, allowing it among other things to buy nuclear technology from China.

Officials discount the possibility of Pakistani help to build an indigenous Saudi nuclear weapon: Saudi Arabia does not appear to have the necessary technical infrastructure. But they say there could be a sort of “lend-lease arrangement” that would allow weapons from Pakistan to be made available to Saudi Arabia. “The argument that they have options on Pakistan's arsenal are more likely,” the US official says.

Both Saudi and Pakistani officials vehemently deny the existence of any such deal. “We've never given money aimed at nuclear research and development and so we never asked or received privileges to nuclear weapons programmes,” insists Prince Turki al-Feisal, the former Saudi intelligence chief who worked closely with Pakistan in the 1980s to channel Arab militants to fight the Soviets in Afghanistan.

Nawaf Obeid, a Saudi security consultant close to the government, however, suggests the kingdom enjoys Pakistan's security umbrella without any formal agreement. “We gave money and they dealt with it as they saw fit,” he says of the Pakistanis. “There's no documentation but there is an implicit understanding that on everything, in particular on security and military issues, Pakistan would be there for Saudi Arabia.”

Though some security analysts doubt Pakistan would jeopardise its own security by jumping to Saudi Arabia's defence, the relationship has been thrown into sharp focus again in recent months with the uncovering of a clandestine nuclear network led by Mr Khan. This sent investigators in search of the so-called “fourth customer” beyond the three to which Mr Khan confessed: Libya, Iran and North Korea.

Diplomats close to the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency say Mr Khan had tried to find customers all over the Middle East but they have yet to find evidence to implicate a fourth country.

So far, there is no suggestion that Saudi Arabia purchased nuclear equipment or expertise from the Khan network. But the network's ability to outsource important elements of a nuclear weapons programme would make it easier for any country even one without much technical infrastructure to start weapons development.

To be sure Saudi Arabia has plenty of reasons and the financial muscle to seek nuclear weapons. Saudis live in a dangerous environment, surrounded by rivals. They include Israel, whose undeclared nuclear arsenal Saudi Arabia criticises as the main block to a nuclear-free Middle East, and Iran, Saudi Arabia's strategic competitor suspected by western governments of developing nuclear weapons.

In the 1980s, when Saddam Hussein was considered a close friend of Saudi Arabia, Iraq's military strength was seen as protection for the Sunni Muslim monarchies of the Gulf against the ambitions of a revolutionary Shia regime in Iran.

After Mr Hussein invaded Kuwait in 1990, however, Iraq became the main threat in the Gulf and the Saudis called on the US for protection. Relations between Iran and Saudi Arabia, meanwhile, gradually improved over the past decade, though remain beset by suspicion.

Nearly all US troops stationed in the country since then were withdrawn last year following the removal of Mr Hussein's regime, leaving a few advisory and support units. Political ties with the US also became strained in the backlash from the September 11 attacks, carried out by mostly Saudi militants.

“Saudi Arabia is in strategic limbo with the US security commitment being called into question or being redefined and with Iran's nuclear programme,” said Wyn Bowen, a lecturer in war studies at Kings College, London.

Against this troubled background, the link with Pakistan has become all the more important. “It's probably one of the closest relationships in the world between any two countries without any official treaty,” says Prince Turki, now ambassador to London. “Just the fact there's a friendly voice heard from time to time is very pleasant in today's world,“ he adds.

Reports of Saudi nuclear ambitions have been around since the 1970s in spite of the consistent rejections by the government. In 1975, according to one report, Saudi Arabia opened a nuclear research centre in a desert military complex, later closing it down.

In 1986-88, Saudi Arabia bought 30 or more intermediate-range DF-3 Chinese missiles, a type used by Beijing to carry nuclear weapons. Both Chinese and Saudi officials said they were adapted to carry conventional warheads, even though their inaccuracy would make them ill-suited for this purpose. In response to US pressure following the purchase, Saudi Arabia signed the non-proliferation treaty and legally foreswore nuclear weapons.

These obsolete missiles may soon have to be replaced. Robert Einhorn, a senior arms control official in the Clinton administration, said Saudi Arabia's missiles came up in US discussions aimed at curbing Chinese sales of long-range missiles in the autumn of 2000. China wanted, he said, to be able to fulfil some pre-existing servicing arrangements. “It became clear they were talking about Saudi Arabia,” he said.

In 1994, a Saudi defector who worked for the kingdom's United Nations mission claimed the Saudi government had paid up to $5bn to Saddam Hussein to build a nuclear weapon and provided funds to Pakistan in return for security guarantees. A visit to Pakistan last year by Crown Prince Abdullah also fed rumours of a new nuclear deal but the allegations were dismissed by the US State Department.

Saudi officials say the country's leaders always considered the acquisition of nuclear weapons a taboo that would bring the kingdom more controversy than comfort. Last year, in the aftermath of the Iraq war, senior princes considered a strategic paper that offered them three options: to acquire a nuclear capability as a deterrent, maintain or enter into an alliance with a nuclear power that would offer protection, or work to rid the region of banned weapons. Prince Turki insists the paper “died in its place”.

Mr Einhorn says that, in fact, there is little hard evidence that Saudi Arabia is pursuing the bomb: “It's like a suspected crime where you have a motive but not much more than that.”

Over the years, however, Saudi Arabia's ties with Pakistan gained strength and the discreet but deep inter-dependency has kept suspicions of nuclear co-operation alive.

Rooted in co-operation between military generals and intelligence operatives, the relationship survived repeated political upheavals in Pakistan. The two countries also have been drawn together by religious ties: the Saudis, custodians of Islam's two holiest sites, have been eager to protect a country, also governed by Sunni Muslims, that was born on the basis of its religion. Moreover, the kingdom has also poured money into religious schools - madrasas - spreading its puritanical brand of Wahabi Islam throughout Pakistan.

“When Pakistan was formed (after the 1947 partition from India) we were losing Palestine. So it seemed in public minds that the establishment of a Muslim state out of a colonial past was somehow a recompense for the losses of the Muslim world in Palestine,“ says Prince Turki.

Saudi officials say Pakistan probably received more Saudi financial aid - which started in the 1960s - than any other country outside the Arab world. In return the Saudis received military and diplomatic assistance. In the 1960s, Pakistani instructors were dispatched to Saudi Arabia to train Saudis on the use of newly acquired British aircraft. In the 1970s, an agreement was reached with Pakistan to second 15,000 military personel to the kingdom. They pulled out in 1987, an era of depressed Saudi oil revenues.

“When we had a large military contingent deployed in Saudi Arabia, the Pakistani government happily noted that the payments for keeping our troops there helped us to pay for a part of our defence,” says a former senior Pakistani military officer who served in Saudi Arabia. “The principle of our relationship is that the Saudis would not let Pakistan sink”.

In the 1980s and 1990s the two countries found common cause in arming the Arab fighters who helped drive the Soviet Union out of Afghanistan. After the Soviet withdrawal and Afghanistan's descent into civil war, both the Saudis and the Pakistanis favoured the Taliban militia which emerged from the Wahabi religious schools in Pakistan.

Hasan Askari Rizvi, a leading Pakistani analyst on defence and national affairs, says Saudi Arabia paid for a batch of 40 F-16 fighter aircraft bought by Pakistan in the 1980s from the US for approximately $1bn. “Not only did the Saudis pay for the aircraft but they also lobbied for Pakistan with the US government,” he says. “The Saudis have played a critical role for Pakistan. Consequently, that has won them tremendous influence in Islamabad”.

Ali Awadh Asseri, the Saudi Ambassador to Islamabad for almost four years, is widely seen as one of the most influential diplomats in Pakistan, though major policy discussions are carried out directly between key officials and leaders in Riyadh and Islamabad.

“Asseri has the kind of access to the Pakistani president and the prime minister which few other ambassadors receive. Maybe the US ambassador falls in the same category” adds Dr Rizvi.

Such is Saudi influence in Pakistan that Saudi officials, including the ambassador, also play a mediating role in Pakistani politics. A year after Pakistan's nuclear tests, Mr Sharif was removed from office in a bloodless military coup and then sentenced to life imprisonment on a controversial charge of ordering the hijacking of a Pakistani airliner.

But he found himself exiled to Saudi Arabia in 2002 for a 10-year period, under a deal struck between General Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan's military ruler, and the Saudi regime. The deal assured a life of comfort for the former Pakistani leader and saved him from the prospect of a long jail term. “The Saudis may not have the ability to change Pakistan's strategic profile in that they don't have a military which can support Pakistan and they're not an arms supplier. But they have the means to make things happen,” says Teresita Schaffer, head of the south Asia program at Washington's Center for Strategic and International Studies.

http://news.ft.com/cms/s/440d27d4-e638-11d8-b549-00000e2511c8.html


22 posted on 08/05/2004 8:56:24 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Chatroom Revolutionaries

August 05, 2004
Reason Online
Marc C. Johnson

"Got a Mullah?" asks a stainless steel coffee mug for sale on the Web. Emblazoned alongside the question is a cartoon of a giant hand clenching two irritated-looking clerics who resemble Iran’s late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

One click away, a heather gray, 100-percent cotton T-shirt proclaiming "Free All Political Prisoners in Iran NOW!" features a famous image of Ahmad Batebi, an Iranian film student sentenced to 15 years for anti-mullah activities. The widely reproduced image shows Batebi’s "crime": holding aloft a bloodstained shirt that belonged to a friend beaten by regime forces.

Both items -- along with lunch boxes, greeting cards, and bumper stickers -- are available to any Iranian expatriate at activistchat.com, a site that also features news, petitions, forums, editorials, and other information of interest to the Iranian diaspora. Such sites are the tools of the would-be next Iranian revolution. Many are produced by revolutionaries who grew up not in Iran but in Europe and North America. They communicate with their comrades however they can, surfing for any scrap of news available from within the tightly controlled Islamic Republic of Iran. Aside from their unconcealed disdain for the ruling clerics in Tehran, they are characterized by an intense nationalism and not a little intergroup disagreement over where Iran should be headed.

"I cannot go into specifics," Potkin Azarmehr, director of the Campaign to Free Iran’s Students (cfisnews.com), says cryptically of his group’s work with those inside Iran. Careless communications, the dissidents explain, can trigger crackdowns, closing precious avenues of contact. "Certainly the global communications revolution has made things a lot easier," he says. "You only have to look at the areas in which the Islamic Republic has endeavored to crack down," he adds, to get clues about how the world of dissident Iranians is operating.

In fact, the way the opposition communicates with students inside Iran is no great secret. E-mails, chat rooms, and phone calls to family and friends are the only near-realtime ways to find out what is going on inside the Islamic Republic. All involved are acutely aware of the fact that Iran’s intelligence and security services try to intercept such communications, with inconsistent results. Roozbeh Farahanipour, executive director of the Glorious Frontiers Party (marzeporgohar.org), notes matter-of-factly that such communications are dangerous, "because if the regime finds out, you are probably going to be executed." But for the students and their supporters, that’s a very big if.

The students believe that in the long run they can defeat the regime’s security efforts. But the regime isn’t their only problem. Despite their high-tech communications, expatriate opponents of the regime face a number of low-tech challenges. Among them are competing agendas, a debilitating scramble for leadership, and a chronic lack of funds.

Such challenges notwithstanding, the dissidents make daily efforts to undermine the regime. As with all authoritarian governments, the Islamic Republic’s security agencies can process only so much information about the counterrevolutionaries, and they are constrained by security requirements, financial resources, even the banal strictures of available time. The student groups know this and hope that through sheer message volume and guile they can stay one step ahead of their adversaries.

Aryo Pirouznia, spokesman for the Student Movement Coordination Committee for Democracy in Iran (daneshjoo.org -- daneshjoo means "student"), observes that when the game is cat and mouse, the mice have to stay on the cutting edge. "Our site has been blocked" by the regime, he states. "But what they don’t understand is that...we are not in an age in which a country’s borders can be closed." Indeed, dissident groups have found a technological solution to their communications problems: Anonymizer.

This program, which allows surfers to view sites while concealing their identities by going through an anonymous proxy server, has been a boon to the Iranian students. When the Iranian security apparatus finally catches up with them, Pirouznia explains, "We change, then they change. We change user names, we change places. We use several chat rooms now. You have the public chat rooms, which are totally monitored [by the regime]; then you have the private chat rooms, which we use."

Proxy servers and chat rooms are not the only Internet-based approaches Pirouznia’s group uses. Such groups are also sending encrypted and compressed documents via U.S.-based free e-mail accounts, a tactic also used by organized criminals, terrorists, spies, journalists, and even businessmen.

"Let’s imagine you have Hotmail, Yahoo, whatever, and you are in Iran," Pirouznia says.

"You have several accounts. Why? Because the [Internet backbone] ‘belongs’ to [the Iranian security services], you can’t claim, ‘I never went to Yahoo or Hotmail.’ They say, ‘Here is the log. You went to it.’" But by having numerous accounts, and by using at least one of them only for apparently benign activities such as sending jokes and family gossip, the user covers his dissident communications. The other accounts, says Pirouznia, "are destroyed after a time, and you get another under another name. And all of the materials that come and go, they are all encrypted. It has become a way of life."

American administrations since the late 1980s have ignored the student groups, instead pursuing a policy of unofficial dialogue with the Islamic Republic. The would-be revolutionaries’ unrequited desire for attention, however, may be coming to an end. In August 2003, for example, the International Broadcasting Bureau, the agency that administers such services as Radio Free Europe, confirmed for the information technology newsletter Security Focus that Uncle Sam would give every Iranian with Internet access a free subscription to Anonymizer -- as long as the subscriber was resident in Iran. Neither the bureau nor Anonymizer will disclose how much this deal is worth, but it could total up to 2 million users.

And last May, Sen. Sam Brownback (R-Kan.) sponsored Senate Bill 1082, the Iran Democracy Act, intended to reform Radio Farda (a sort of Farsi Voice of America), provide grants to other external Iranian media, and back a referendum on Islamic rule. Most observers believe the bill was meant to be a shot across the Islamic Republic’s bow. Brownback’s bill has not been signed into law, however, and further legislation is unlikely in an election year. Congressional interest notwithstanding, the dissident groups, both external and internal, are still largely on their own.

The sites officially represented by Azarmehr, Pirouznia, and Farahanipour are three of perhaps a dozen that form the core of the Iranian opposition in exile’s fractious electronic vanguard. There are monarchists, socialists, constitutionalists, Zoroastrians, republicans, hard-core communists, moderate Islamists, Mossadeghists, Azeris, and other less well-defined confederations of students, aging ex-students, and businessmen distributed throughout the West. They are far from unified. Iran watchers believe that "the opposition" is a misnomer, that there simply is no unified opposition. Privately, many members of the opposition will admit as much. Why they can’t unify is a tougher question. Pirouznia attributes it to Iranian character. "We have a problem with being self-centered," he argues.

"If I am a political activist, I think that everything should be channeled through me."

The only times in recent memory that the expatriate opposition has even gathered around the same table have been during periods of major crisis for those still in Iran -- when the regime has cracked down on dissent. Even when they do get together, it rarely results in any significant action. Describing an "old guard" among the opposition, Azarmehr says: "One thing which seems very fashionable amongst the Iranian opposition outside Iran is signing up to charters. They gather in some hotel, draw up a charter, and put their signatures at the bottom of the charter. Then they go away and nothing further happens."

Azarmehr’s point is underlined by the array of Web sites advocating alternatives to the current regime, each of which seems to have a petition or charter of its own. With some, like activistchat.com, the ideology is difficult to divine on first examination; the site espouses secularism and provides news. Others, such as the Iran National Front (jebhemelli.net), proudly proclaim, "our path is the Mossadegh path," referring to the Iranian prime minister ousted by a CIA-backed coup d’etat in 1953.

Still others want to re-install a shah on the Peacock Throne. Freemyiran.com, a site that features pro-monarchist elements, offers free bumper stickers as well as flyers in Adobe Acrobat format that supporters can print out and distribute. And far from the front lines, in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., Reza Pahlavi, son of the late shah, is pushing his own political agenda with books, a Web site, and public appearances. Skirting a discussion of the troubling human rights record of the shah’s intelligence and security service, the SAVAK, rezapahlavi.org provides position papers and speeches advocating secularism and a referendum on Islamic rule.

Farahanipour’s Glorious Frontiers Party advocates a boycott of Shell Oil, the Dutch petroleum conglomerate that does business with the regime. Farahanipour’s point is one pushed by many parts of the opposition: Cut off the money -- in particular the European investment that continues to support the leaders in Tehran -- and you will sever the regime’s lifeline. His site -- which features a picture of a lion holding a sword in front of a blazing sun, a favored pre-revolutionary symbol -- asks the visitor to "support Iranians in their fight against religious apartheid in Iran."

Farahanipour concedes the diversity of opposition groups may be the external dissidents’ undoing. "Unfortunately, each group wants to be the leader of the opposition," he says.

"Most groups focus their attention on putting down other groups, so they can make themselves more credible. The majority of political groups outside Iran simply do not have any power or members inside Iran."

The one factor that seems to bind the groups together is that their members all have day jobs. For the most part, funding is so scarce that they are beholden to a few meager donations from well-meaning businessmen. Despite the considerable size and relative affluence of the Iranian diaspora, the groups say funds are slow to come. Azarmehr, whose organization is based in Britain, complains: "Hardly any money comes from anywhere...Our own income last year came from one donor who gave a few hundred pounds to us to print some T-shirts with the picture of Batebi...and the sale of those T-shirts and our own individual donations has been our entire budget. We are all part-time activists and have the normal stresses of having full-time jobs."

Pirouznia spins it a different way. "We are night partisans and day workers," he says cheerfully.

The internal groups are finding it especially hard to make ends meet. "There is hardly any money which is being channeled to the combatants inside Iran," says Azarmehr. "We are talking about a few thousand pounds in irregular donations. Certainly compared to the financial backing that Khomeini had from some foreign sources and the Iranian bazaar merchants [in 1979], we really are talking a pittance." Farahanipour echoes this point: "We get our money from personal donations and our members. Whatever money we do receive, we simply try to pass on to our members inside Iran, or fund events to inform the public of what’s going on in Iran."

To simplify the donation process, some of the groups have adopted high-tech money raising techniques. Several have signed onto PayPal and other online money transfer services. Farahanipour attributes the difficulty in raising funds to confusion about the groups themselves; he even hints at malfeasance by other anti-regime fund-raisers. "Unfortunately Iranians that live outside Iran have been lied to so frequently by the supposed opposition that they no longer believe that there are genuine opposition groups that need their donations," he says.

Few, if any, of the Iranian opposition groups receive U.S. government money, at least overtly. Radio Farda, funded through the State Department, keeps the opposition groups largely at arm’s length. This suits the opposition, which takes a dim view of the State Department’s strategy of engagement with the Islamic Republic. Farahanipour scoffs that Mohammed Khatami, Iran’s reformist president, "attempted to show that a theocracy can be made a democracy, and it seems the only [people] he fooled were the State Department."

The Iranian opposition groups were apoplectic when -- following a dinner in January with Mohammed Javad Zarif, Iran’s permanent envoy to the United Nations -- several members of Congress proposed an official visit to Iran. Opposition message boards around the world lit up, their participants incensed at the idea of rapprochement with the mullahs. It was spectacularly bad timing for the proposal, coming just as the Guardians’ Council was disqualifying reformist parliamentarians from running in the February elections.

In the end, the opposition groups needn’t have worried. Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi indicated that the trip was "not on the agenda," a diplomatic way of telling the American politicians they couldn’t invite themselves to Tehran so easily.

The State Department and errant members of Congress are not the only such objects of scorn. The European Union is derided by many groups for its "critical dialogue" policy, which stipulates that engagement with the clerical regime can in the long run improve conditions for ordinary Iranians. "We have always had a bad experience with European countries," says Farahanipour. "If you were to draw out all the advancements the E.U.’s critical dialogue brought, you’d be hard pressed to cite three things."

Azarmehr is equally skeptical of European efforts. Iranians, he says, "want the E.U. to finally admit that their policy of critical dialogue with the Islamic Republic in the last 25 years has been futile." Azarmehr observes that the Islamic Republic "still abuses human rights, still sponsors terrorism and still destabilizes peace and prosperity in the Middle East and the world despite 25 years of ‘critical dialogue’ by the European Union countries."

What the groups want from America is solidarity, especially rhetorical support from the White House in their campaign to delegitimize the mullahs. "We welcome any support, but not involvement," Farahanipour says. "When President Bush spoke of how Americans are standing with the people of Iran in their quest for democracy, that was moral support."

Pirouznia agrees. "In general the new U.S. administration has understood the reality of things going on in Iran," he says. "We are asking not to intervene militarily; that would be the biggest mistake the U.S. could make. We ask for their moral support."

Marc C. Johnson, a former CIA officer, is a consultant and freelance writer in Washington, D.C.

August/September 2004

http://www.reason.com/0408/cr.mj.chatroom.shtml


23 posted on 08/05/2004 9:01:04 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Europe's Iranian Dilemma

August 05, 2004
Deutsche Welle
Opinion

Iran said this week it didn't feel bound by promises brokered by Germany, France and Britain to control its nuclear program. Fruitless talks in Paris, at the same time, have left Europe increasing frustrated.

The foreign ministers of Germany, France and Britain avoided an escalation in the row over Iran's nuclear program by convincing Tehran to sign a supplementary protocol of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) late last year.

Then the Iranians said they would allow the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna to carry out unlimited checks, and Tehran would suspend all activities to enrich uranium.

In return, the Europeans promised not to bring the "case of Iran" to the UN Security Council, but to leave it with the IAEA. And they suggested that if Iran continued to cooperate, they would provide the country with technical expertise for the peaceful use of nuclear power.

Nothing has come of it.

Even after the agreement was made, Tehran concealed its activities to build centrifuges that could be used to make weapons-grade uranium. Tehran continues to insist it has no plans to enrich uranium -- to complete the process of purifying the element for use as fuel for nulear power or weapons.

But, in Europe, mistrust and irritation have grown considerably since that announcement.

Still, the Europeans have avoided drastic declarations or measures. They want to wait until the IAEA presents its next report, in September. The Europeans would only change course to the American position -- to bring the case before the UN Security Council -- if the report does indeed turn out to be negative.

Washington is convinced that that will be happen.

Aided by Israeli claims, the United States has long accused Iran of using its nuclear program to fashion itself into a regional nuclear power, rather than pursuing peaceful means, as Tehran claims it is doing.

Washington is also the driving force behind the attempt to bring the issue before the Security Council, although, in view of developments in Iraq, the Americans' "enthusiasm" has waned somewhat. Apparently, Washington has abandoned the idea of "dealing with" Iran -- the second country in its "axis of exil" -- next.

In Tehran, the issue was long ago declared a question of national honor -- even more so since parliamentary elections in February strengthened the conservatives' influence. But the Iranians haven't exactly demonstrated tactical skill: Secretiveness and threats to revoke last year's agreement only increase the Europeans' mistrust and the Americans' arguments.

Less could surely achieve more: The Europeans have a strong interest in showing the United States that diplomacy accomplishes more than muscling. Europe would certainly be sticking to its promise to Iran, which it also wants to gain as a partner in other areas. Nobody's making it easy for the Europeans.

http://www.dw-world.de/english/0,3367,7549_A_1287695_1_A,00.html


24 posted on 08/05/2004 9:02:34 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iraq Accuses Iran of Fuelling Violence in its Territory to Settle Scores with US

August 05, 2004
AP
Khaleej Times

KUWAIT CITY -- Iraq's defence minister has accused Iran of promoting the violence in his country, saying that Iran should not be using his country to "settle its scores" with America.

In an interview published in yesterday's Al Anba, Defence Minister Hazem Shaalan accused certain neighbouring states of a lack of concern for Iraq's predicament as a land struggling to be reborn from the poverty and destruction left by the war that toppled dictator Saddam Hussein.

"Some of the neighbours did not care about this. They added fuel to the fire," Shaalan said.

Asked if he meant Iran, the defence minister said: "Yes, it is Iran. I have said it before ... and I say Iran, Iran, Iran."

It was the second time in two months that Mr Shaalan has blamed Iran for the insecurity in Iraq. Last month he said Iran was Iraq's "first enemy" because it was playing a role in the insurgency. Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi later distanced his government from the remark.

http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/middleeast/2004/August/middleeast_August142.xml&section=middleeast&col=


25 posted on 08/05/2004 9:03:28 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran Accused of Playing Double Game

August 05, 2004
smh.com.au

Iran has served as a refuge for al-Qaeda operatives suspected of plotting attacks in Europe and the Middle East, despite its periodic crackdown on the terrorist network, and of playing a central role in the Iraqi insurgency, terrorism investigators in Europe say.

Investigations in France, Italy, Spain and other countries since the September 11, 2001 attacks in the US point to an increasing presence in Iran of al-Qaeda figures, including suspected organisers of train bombings in the Spanish capital, Madrid, last March, and last year's car bombings in Saudi Arabia.

But Iran's complex politics and secretive policies have made it difficult to determine the nature of any relationship between Iranian officials and the terrorist network, investigators say.

The potential ties between Iran and al-Qaeda were highlighted last month with the release of the final report of the US special commission into the September 11 attacks. The US panel found that eight of the hijackers had travelled through Iran, but produced little evidence of an al-Qaeda-Iran alliance before the 2001 attacks.

Western law enforcement officials are concerned about the menace posed by the group since September 11, including its involvement in Iraq and attacks in Europe, North Africa and the Middle East.

Osama bin Laden's movement has re-formed since 2001, with Iran often used as a refuge for key members who have gained stature and autonomy while bin Laden has faded from the limelight, officials say.

An unnamed French law enforcement officer said the Iranians played "a double game. Everything they can do to trouble the Americans, without going too far, they do it". The Iranians "have arrested important al-Qaeda people, but they have permitted other important al-Qaeda people to operate. It is a classic Iranian style of ambiguity, deception, manipulation."

Iran insists it has dismantled any terrorist networks in its territory. Hamid Reza Asseif, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, said recently: "Iran has no affinity with Taliban and al-Qaeda, and Iran has proven it by words and acts."

European investigators say Iran has alternately pursued and tolerated al-Qaeda, because the group serves as a tool for Iran's geopolitical interests in neighbouring Iraq and against key foes: the US, Israel and Saudi Arabia.

Any Iranian support for al-Qaeda remains indirect and limited, investigators believe, because of fundamental differences between bin Laden's Sunni Muslim movement and the Shiite regime in Tehran.

Some experts also distinguish between Iran's comparatively moderate political leadership and its hardline security forces, particularly the Revolutionary Guard, which functions as a "state within a state," a London-based analyst said.

"When the Iranian Government says it is not dealing with al-Qaeda, it is telling the truth," said Mustafa Alani of the Royal United Services Institutes, a think tank affiliated with the British Ministry of Defence. "It's not the Government, it's the Revolutionary Guard."

Al-Qaeda figures who allegedly have operated in Iran, according to court documents and investigators in Europe, include Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, the Jordanian seen as a leader of the Iraq insurgency, Saif Adel, an Egyptian regarded as al-Qaeda's military chief, and Mustafa Setmariam Nasar, suspected of organising the Madrid attacks.

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/08/04/1091557924775.html?oneclick=true


26 posted on 08/05/2004 9:06:48 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Shi'ites Declare Holy War On British

SkyNews ^ | August 05, 2004
Posted on 08/05/2004 7:28:20 AM PDT by traumer

Militiamen loyal to Shi'ite Muslim radical leader Moqtada al-Sadr have declared holy war against British forces based in Iraq's main southern city of Basra.

The declaration came after four of their comrades were arrested.

"We will wage jihad and war against the foreign troops, not against police and Iraqi forces," said Sheikh Saad al-Basri, al-Sadr's representative in the largely Shi'ite city.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1185529/posts


27 posted on 08/05/2004 10:59:53 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Bump!


28 posted on 08/05/2004 4:58:58 PM PDT by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

29 posted on 08/05/2004 9:20:25 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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