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Iranian Alert - September 19, 2004 [EST]- IRAN LIVE THREAD - "Americans for Regime Change in Iran"
Americans for Regime Change In Iran ^ | 9.19.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 09/18/2004 9:01:00 PM PDT by DoctorZIn

The US media still largely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” As a result, most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East. In fact they were one of the first countries to have spontaneous candlelight vigils after the 911 tragedy (see photo).

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. I began these daily threads June 10th 2003. On that date Iranians once again began taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Today in Iran, most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin




TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: alsadr; armyofmahdi; ayatollah; cleric; humanrights; iaea; insurgency; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; iraq; islamicrepublic; jayshalmahdi; journalist; kazemi; khamenei; khatami; khatemi; moqtadaalsadr; mullahs; persecution; persia; persian; politicalprisoners; poop; protests; rafsanjani; revolutionaryguard; rumsfeld; satellitetelephones; shiite; southasia; southwestasia; studentmovement; studentprotest; terrorism; terrorists; wot
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin

1 posted on 09/18/2004 9:01:02 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 09/18/2004 9:03:19 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

U.N. Agency Demands Iran Suspend Uranium Enrichment Program, Will Judge Compliance in 2 Months

VIENNA, Austria Sept. 18, 2004 — For the first time, 35 nations in the U.N. atomic watchdog agency demanded Saturday that Iran freeze all work on uranium enrichment a technology that can be used for nuclear arms and said it would judge Tehran's compliance in two months.

The resolution passed by the agency was its toughest yet on Tehran but didn't go as far as the United States had sought by saying Iran will automatically be sent to the U.N. Security Council for possible sanctions if it fails to meet the demands by November.

U.S. officials, however, insisted the 35-member board of the International Atomic Energy Agency must refer Iran to the council when it meets again on Nov. 25 if Tehran doesn't comply.

"The issue is whether or not they're going to give up nuclear weapons" by the November meeting, U.S. Undersecretary of State John Bolton told The Associated Press. "The ball is in Iran's court."

"The time for decisive action is approaching," said Jackie Sanders, the chief U.S. delegate to the IAEA board meeting. "To wait until the IAEA finds the nuclear weapons ... is to wait until it is too late."

The United States says Iran's nuclear program is aimed at producing weapons, a claim Tehran denies.

The resolution passed unanimously Saturday said the board "considers it necessary" that Iran suspend all uranium enrichment and related programs. And it expressed alarm at Iranian plans to convert more than 40 tons of raw uranium into uranium hexafluoride the gas that when spun in centrifuges turns into enriched uranium.

It also said it "strongly urges" Iran to meet all demands by the agency in its investigation of the country's nearly two decades of clandestine nuclear activity, including unrestricted access to sites, information and personnel that can shed light on still unanswered questions on whether Tehran was interested in the atom for nuclear weapons.

It called on the IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei to provide a review of the findings of a more-than one year probe of Iran's nuclear activities which Tehran insists are strictly tailored toward generating electricity.

Suggesting that the Islamic Republic could answer to the U.N. Security Council should it defy the demands, the resolution said the next board meeting in November "will decide whether or not further steps are appropriate" in ensuring Iran complies.

The Americans praised the text, saying it showed the world was united against Iran's nuclear program.

"This resolution sends an unmistakable signal to Iran that continuing its nuclear weapons program will bring it inevitably before the (U.N.) Security Council," Sanders told reporters.

ElBaradei described the text as reflecting "the collective will of the international community," adding: "The resolution is very clear as to what is expected of Iran in the next few months."

The last board resolution in June had been less insistent on the issue of suspending enrichment, a process that can develop material for nuclear weapons, or fuel for an energy program, as Iran says it intends.

Still, the text approved Saturday appeared to fall far short of what the Americans had wanted coming into the meeting when it opened Monday.

Washington had pushed to drop mention of countries' rights to peaceful nuclear technology and fought for an Oct. 31 deadline, with the understanding that if Iran failed to comply the board would then automatically begin deliberations on Security Council referral.

The phrasing accepted instead left it up to the board to debate what action if any to take when it reconvenes Nov. 25 should Iran be found to have ignored the demand to freeze enrichment or other conditions.

Iran's chief delegate to the meeting asserted that Washington was frustrated in its main goals "putting (a) deadline of Oct 31, (and) second an automatic trigger mechanism."

"Both were neglected, and we have nothing like this in the resolution," Hossain Mousavian told reporters.

In a telefaxed statement to the AP, German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer said the resolution "underlines the concerns of the international community of states regarding the Iranian nuclear program."

Still, indirectly contradicting U.S. assertions that Iran automatically belonged before the Security Council, chief German delegate Herbert Honsowitz suggested the resolution did nothing more than empower the board to "set the stage ... on how this issue can be dealt with further in the IAEA."

Bolton, the U.S. undersecretary of state, said that unless Iran fully meets all conditions of the resolution the board would follow America's lead come November.

"The odds are the Iranians are going to try to throw as much sand in people's eyes as they can," he told the AP. "If they're still pursuing the same policies, I'm confident we are going to win that vote," on referral to the Security Council, he said.

Iran says it is honoring a pledge not to put uranium hexafluoride gas into centrifuges, spin it and make enriched uranium. But the resolution calls for a stop as well to other activities, including the assembling of centrifuges and the production of uranium hexafluoride.

Iran is not prohibited from enrichment under its obligations to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. But it has for months faced international pressure to suspend such activities as a good-faith gesture and the resolution went further by actually demanding a stop to enrichment and related activities.

Ahead of approval which came after days of backdoor negotiations and resistance by nonaligned countries that saw their own right to enrichment for peaceful use threatened by the text Mousavian, the chief Iranian delegate, held out the possibility of meeting the resolution's key demand.

Iran's "decision-makers will decide about the main request full suspension," in the next few days, he told the AP.

http://abcnews.go.com/wire/World/ap20040918_965.html


3 posted on 09/18/2004 9:05:27 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

U.N. Tells Iran To Suspend Nuke Program

[Excerpt]

September 18, 2004
The Associated Press
Dow Jones Newswires


A 35-nation meeting of the U.N. atomic watchdog agency Saturday demanded that Iran suspend all aspects of a key process that can be used to make nuclear weapons, and set an indirect late fall deadline for Tehran to heed its conditions.

The U.S. - which accuses Iran of trying to make such arms - praised the text and urged the conference to act to send Tehran to the U.N. Security Council in November should it be found to have defied any of the resolution's conditions.

"To wait until the IAEA finds the nuclear weapons...is to wait until it is too late," chief U.S. delegate Jackie Sanders said in prepared comments to the International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors.

"With every passing week, Iran moves that much closer to reaching the point where neither we, nor any other international body, will be able to prevent it from achieving nuclear weapons capacity," she said. "The time for decisive action is approaching."

Approved unanimously by delegates at the board meeting, the toughly worded resolution said it "considers it necessary" that Iran freeze all uranium enrichment and related programs and expressed alarm at Iranian plans to convert more than 40 tons of raw uranium into uranium hexafluoride - the gas that when spun in centrifuges turns into enriched uranium.

It also said it "strongly urges" Iran to meet all demands by the agency in its investigation of the country's nearly two decades of clandestine nuclear activity, including unrestricted access to sites, information and personnel that can shed light on still unanswered questions on whether Tehran was interested in the atom for nuclear weapons.

It called on the IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei "to provide a review of the findings of a more-than one year probe of Iran 's nuclear activities which Tehran insists are strictly tailored toward generating electricity.

Suggesting that the Islamic Republic could answer to the U.N. Security Council should it defy the demands, the resolution said the next board meeting in November "will decide whether or not further steps are appropriate" in ensuring Iran complies.

The U.S. delegation, which accuses Iran of using the argument of peaceful nuclear aims to acquire the technology to make weapons, praised the text as sending a "stark" message to Iran .

"This resolution sends an unmistakable signal to Iran that continuing its nuclear weapons program will bring it inevitably before the (U.N.) Security Council," Sanders, the chief U.S. delegate, told reporters.

"Iran must not be permitted to acquire nuclear weapons," she said, asserting that the resolution set the next meeting of the board in November as an unambiguous "deadline...for Iran to cease its pursuit of nuclear weapons."

Still, the text appeared to leave Iran wiggle room. While demanding Iran suspend all uranium enrichment activities, the resolution also recognized nations' right to the peaceful use of nuclear energy - which Iran says is what it wants nuclear enrichment for.

By giving the Iranians room to maneuver on enrichment, the resolution appeared to fall far short of what the U.S. had wanted coming into the meeting. Washington had pushed to drop mention of countries' rights to peaceful nuclear technology and fought for an Oct. 31 deadline, with the understanding that if Iran failed to comply the board would then automatically begin deliberations on Security Council referral.

The phrasing accepted instead left it up to the board to debate what action - if any - to take when it reconvenes Nov. 25 should Iran be found to have ignored the demand to freeze enrichment or other conditions.

Iran 's chief delegate to the meeting asserted that Washington was frustrated in its main goals -"putting deadline of Oct 31, (and) second an automatic trigger mechanism."

"Both were neglected, and we have nothing like this in the resolution," he told reporters.

Iran 's present suspension freeze falls short of international demands.

It says it is honoring a pledge not to put uranium hexafluoride gas into centrifuges, spin it and make enriched uranium. But the resolution calls for a stop as well to related activities, including a halt to making, assembling and testing centrifuges, and to producing uranium hexafluoride, the feed stock for enrichment.

Iran isn't prohibited from enrichment under its obligations to the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. It has for months faced international pressure to suspend such activities as a good-faith gesture, but the resolution went further by actually demanding a stop to enrichment and related activities.

Ahead of approval - which came after days of backdoor negotiations and resistance by nonaligned countries that saw their own right to enrichment for peaceful use threatened by the text - Mousavian held out the possibility of meeting the resolution's key demand.

Iran 's "decision-makers will decide about the main request - full suspension," in the next few days, he told the Associated press.

4 posted on 09/18/2004 9:05:46 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran to test fire 'strategic missile'

Iran's revolutionary guards were to test fire a 'strategic missile' Saturday following the launch of new surface-to-surface and surface-to-air missiles Friday, a senior IRGC commander said, IRNA reported from Zanjan.

The new missile will be test fired during war games being held on a vast swath of land in the western provinces of Zanjan, Hamedan and Kurdestan, the spokesman of the "Ashura 5" maneuvers, Hossein Salami said.

"With the induction and launch of this missile, the scope of the Ashura 5 maneuvers will practically increase several folds," he said.

The IRGC will publish soon further information about the missile, Salami added.

The Ashura 5 war games are being held over an area, estimated at 60,000 square kilometers with the participation of 12 infantry and mechanized divisions.

The maneuvers are aimed at 'boosting the combat capability of the forces and bolstering their defensive morale as well as assessing and testing advanced equipment'.

Iran is fresh from the successful test of an upgraded version of its Shahab-3 medium-range ballistic missile last month.

Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani said earlier this month that "given that an effective deterrent policy does not halt at a certain point, the Islamic Republic of Iran continues upgrading its defensive capability."

"Being powerful does not necessarily means war-mongering, neither do the roads of peace lead to concession," Shamkhani added.

Shamkhani said Iran has now acquired an 'effective deterrent power' to confront its enemies in the region.

"Today by relying on our defense industry capabilities, we have been able to increase our deterrent capacity against the military expansion of regional enemies," he said.

Military experts have said the Shahab-3 missile is capable of striking Israel or any other enemy target in the region.

The test came as Israel's Arrow missile defense system, designed to counter threats such as the Shahab-3, passed its first live test in July by downing a Scud missile off the coast of California.

The Arrow-2 missile system, however, failed to destroy the detachable warhead of an incoming missile fired by a US Air Force aircraft in a test off the coast of California.

News agencies said an advanced Israeli spy satellite meant to boost Israel's surveillance over Iran plunged into the sea after a malfunction on liftoff.

Reuters said the Israeli Defense Ministry had blamed a failure in the third stage of the rocket launch for the loss of the dlrs 50 million Ofek-6 satellite.

Ofek-6 -- the latest in an Israeli line of spy satellites first put into orbit in 1988 -- was destroyed when it crashed into the Mediterranean Sea, the news agency said.

Reuters quoted Ephrain Sneh, head of the parliamentary defense subcommittee as saying that 'the damage in terms of intelligence, financing, and prestige caused by the botched launch are unacceptable'.

The crash is seen a major setback to Israel's attempts to upgrade methods of gathering intelligence on Iran.

Iran has stressed that its missile program is defensive, while Iranian military commanders have warned of grave consequences if Israel attacks the country.

Tehran, however, has repudiated US Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's allegations that Iran may be working to develop missiles capable of reaching the United States.

Rumsfeld has named Iran among countries which were allegedly working to develop and deploy missiles capable of reaching the United States.

Tensions have been heightened by the US campaign to organize international pressure on Iran to halt its nuclear program, which Tehran says is strictly peaceful.

Iran says the program is in accordance with the country's bid to produce 7,000 megawatts of electricity in the next 20 years, when the country's oil and gas reserves become overstretched.

The United States, however, claims that Tehran's nuclear program is a prelude to building an atomic bomb.

http://www.payvand.com/news/04/sep/1164.html


5 posted on 09/18/2004 9:06:25 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Full text of IAEA's resolution on Iran

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2004/09/18/international1802EDT0594.DTL


6 posted on 09/18/2004 9:06:52 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Europe's resolution politically motivated: Iranian Official

Vienna, Sept 18, IRNA -- Iran regards the draft resolution proposed three European states of Germany, Britain and France on the country's nuclear programs as politically motivated, the spokesman for the Iranian delegation to the meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Board of Governors, Hossein Moussavian, said in Vienna on Saturday.

Talking to IRNA on the sidelines of the IAEA Board of Governors' meeting in UN headquarter in Europe, Moussavian added the resolution paid no attention to a positive report by IAEA Chief Mohamed ElBaradei on Iran's cooperation and its good will.

"This is while a major part of ElBaradei's report has been concentrated on the progress made in this respect such as solving of such issues as laser enrichment process, uranium conversion, 36 and 54 percent pollution as well as other progress achieved in P-1 and P-2 issues," he said.

The official noted that the report pointed to Iran's increasing cooperation, full access to its nuclear facilities and presentation of a clear image of Iran's nuclear activities, but all these positive developments have been referred to in the European resolution in a simple sentence "We welcome the achieved progress".

"This sentence is aimed at decreasing the positive load of the resolution, and therefore Iran considers it as a fully political and an unwise attitude taken by the Europeans," Moussavian stressed.

He welcomed that part of the resolution calling for ElBaradei's complete report on Iran's nuclear activities, saying Iran demanded its case be closed by November which depends on ElBaradei's comprehensive report and the Board of Governors' decision.

"Iran will continue its cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency because the country has benefitted from such cooperation," he said.

The resolution passed by the IAEA Board of Governors has more positive points than the previous ones which is an indication of the authenticity of Iran's claims and the falsehood of the US claims, he noted.

He also stressed the continuation of Iran's cooperation with European states, saying "Iran has always benefitted from such cooperation because the US has always been hasty in sending Iran's nuclear case to the U.N. Security Council and the resolution presented by the Europeans was a setback for the US in this regard."

In the current meeting, the US has also sought to set a deadline and an automatic trigger mechanism to send Iran's nuclear case to the UN Security Council but it suffered a defeat due to Europe's resistance.

"Although the Islamic Republic of Iran is not content with the Europeans' resolution, it is satisfied with the Europeans' resistance to US demands," he said.

Such a resistance has provided Iran and the IAEA with proper opportunities to prove the falsehood of the Americans' claims, he said.

In response to a question on Iran's reaction to a request for suspension of uranium enrichment process, he said the country's officials are to discuss and make a final decision on whether to continue temporary suspension or completely halt the process this week.

The country's high ranking officials have been engaged in decision making process from early stages and it is them who have the final say in this respect, he underlined.

Lauding the stances taken by the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) on the draft resolution proposed by the Europeans, he said they have explicitly and clearly declared that the resolution is not based on facts.

The members of Non-Aligned Movement has called for a separate voting on notes seven and eight of the resolution offered by three European countries, he pointed out.

There are some positive notes in the resolution which underline the peaceful nature of Iran's nuclear activities, Iran's continued cooperation with IAEA to remove all existing ambiguities, and Iran's voluntary decision on suspension of uranium enrichment, he said.

Talks on notes seven and eight of the resolution still continue, he said.

The NAM countries has called for separate voting for notes seven and eight of the resolution which has been opposed by the European countries.

http://www.payvand.com/news/04/sep/1163.html


7 posted on 09/18/2004 9:08:28 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran Moves to Roll Back Rights Won by Women


By Nazila Fathi
Sep 19, 2004

TEHRAN - The hard-liners who won Iran's parliamentary elections last February have focused on women's rights in their efforts to reverse some of the reforms carried out under the moderate president, Mohammad Khatami.

After the legislative session began in June, the 290-member Parliament, including all 12 of the women, abruptly rejected proposals to expand the inheritance right of Iranian women and to adopt the United Nations convention that bans discrimination against women. They also backed away from previous efforts to make "gender equality" a goal of the country's next four-year development plan.

Instead, the new Parliament has called for placing more restrictions on women's attire and on their social freedoms.

Since the 1979 Islamic revolution, women have been forced to cover their heads and wear long, loose coats in public. But many had defied the restrictions since Mr. Khatami's election in 1997 and started wearing tighter and more colorful coats and showing more hair.

In recent months, though, newspapers have reported that scores of women have been arrested in Tehran, the capital, and around the country because they were wearing what the authorities considered to be un-Islamic dress.

Members of Parliament have called for segregating men and women at universities and for other limits on women's activities. Hard-liners have held protests to call for a crackdown on freedoms for women and have contended that women ridicule religious sanctities by violating the dress code.

The previous Parliament, dominated by reformists, embraced more legal rights for women and - despite opposition by hard-liners - expanded women's right to divorce and child custody.

Eshrat Shaegh, a conservative woman who has a seminary education and who is one of the women elected to Parliament in the sweep by hard-liners, wrote a letter to Mr. Khatami in July that called for an end to the mixing of unmarried young men and women in public places.

"How do you intend to resolve problems by allowing half-nude women to mingle and party with men who dress like women?" she asked in her letter, referring to women who in the hard-liners' view show too much hair and men who wear colorful clothes.

Abolhassan Davoudi, director of the office that deals with Iranian cinema, was arrested this week and had a heart attack while in custody. He was accused of allowing women who were not properly covered to attend a meeting at his offices. But some political analysts here believe that the hard-liners will ultimately not succeed.

"It is very obvious that the new Parliament would like to impose a strict model of covering for women, but they will not succeed," said Ahmad Zeidabadi, a political scientist and journalist in Tehran. "The more they put pressure, the more they get a reaction because people simply do not think such restrictions can solve their more basic needs."

Imposing restrictions on women's dress has been a barometer - showing how far the authorities are willing to go to allow social freedom and give more rights to women.

Nearly two-thirds of Iran's population is under 30, and more than 60 percent of university students are women. Women have become more vocal, and they demand equal rights. They want jobs and more legal rights within the family structure.

"The general trend in this country is moving towards reforms," said Haleh Anvari a political analyst in Tehran. "These restrictions are like putting a little stone in front of a huge storm that is going for reform," she added, referring to efforts made by the new Parliament.

Women who have been pressing for expanded rights, however, were infuriated when in August a 16-year-old girl, Atefeh Rajabi, was hanged for adultery in the northern city of Neka while the man with whom she was accused of having a sexual relationship received 100 lashes. Amnesty International said the young woman was not thought to be mentally competent.

Women also reacted when Fatimeh Aliya, a hard-line member of Parliament, suggested that polygamy was a way to improve the lot of poor women. Iranian law allows men to marry up to four permanent wives and an unlimited number of temporary wives. But polygamy is despised by most people here, and those who engage in polygamy usually practice it secretly.

"Polygamy eventually serves the interests of women," Ms. Aliya was quoted as saying in newspaper reports. "No woman can emotionally accept another woman in her life, but if she puts herself in the shoes of a woman who needs support then she can accept the idea."

A former member of Parliament, reacting to her comment, suggested that perhaps Ms. Aliya's husband should be encouraged to lead the way.

Most of the women in the hard-line camp who serve in Parliament are members of a women's group called the Zeinab Society. Ms. Aliya said the group received its financing from Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the feminist magazine Zanan reported.

Unlike women in the previous Parliament, who became known for their outspokenness and bravery, the new hard-line members have sought to keep a low profile. They have not accepted positions on the presiding board, and they drew a curtain around themselves in Parliament's dining area so that they would not be seen by their male colleagues.

"Giving women noneconomic and nonpolitical positions in Parliament commissions illustrates the ideal society the conservatives favor," Zanan wrote in an editorial last month. "They prefer that women remain in these sections."

8 posted on 09/18/2004 9:11:07 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iranian Hercules Rezazadeh due in Athens to raise spirits

Tehran, Sept 18, IRNA -- Hossein Rezazadeh, world's strongest man, plans to go to the Greek capital, Athens, to lift the Iranian weightlifters' spirits in the 12th Paralympic Games.

The Iranian Federation for the Disabled and War-Disabled Sports is making arrangements for the presence of the world and Olympic +105 kg record-holder in the prestigious tournament.

The cherubic Iranian colossus proved invincible as he won the Olympic gold on walkover in Athens on August 25.

The 26-year-old, who invoked Hazrat Abolfazl (AS), a religious leader of the Shiites, prior to his every attempt edged past all rivals with a 210 kg lift in snatch, which was later combined with a world record of 263.5 kg in the clean and jerk.

Rezazadeh improved his own record by 0.5 kg as he incredibly flung the bar above his head in his third clean-and-jerk effort.

"It was a good performance. I came full strength to win the gold medal," said the Iranian Hercules as he had a copy of the holy Qur'an in his hand.

"I had tough training and Allah helped me."

The sturdy icon, now the two-time Olympic gold medalist and twice world champion, was too strong for world superheavies as his total lift, 472.5 kg, was well above the records of silver winner from Latvia Viktors Scerbatihs and Bulgaria's Velichko Cholakov, who bagged bronze.

Scerbatihs totally hoisted 455 kg and Cholakov 447.5.

http://www.payvand.com/news/04/sep/1165.html


9 posted on 09/18/2004 9:11:39 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Ahura Yazdi says he will return to Iran on October 1 to liberate the country from the mollas.

-- He's delusional 25.08 % (76)
-- He's worth listening to 2.97 % (9)
-- I believe in him 2.97 % (9)
-- Let's see what happens on October 1 26.07 % (79)
-- You're all crazy. He's a joke. 24.09 % (73)
-- He's a CIA creation to see how we react 3.96 % (12)
-- I know him. Run! 0.00 % (0)
-- He's a normal guy with honorable goals 5.94 % (18)
-- He's an IRI creation to divert our attention 4.29 % (13)
-- He's no worse than others in the opposition 4.62 % (14)

http://poll.mashregh.com/


10 posted on 09/18/2004 9:15:54 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn


Iran's turkmen mongol minority pose.
11 posted on 09/18/2004 9:19:27 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

lol. Well, 50% think he's a nut.
I'm going along with the crowd.


12 posted on 09/18/2004 9:27:44 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: nuconvert

I was one of the very few who voted:

-- He's an IRI creation to divert our attention 4.29 % (13)


13 posted on 09/18/2004 9:48:49 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

Add my vote...

He's delusional


14 posted on 09/18/2004 10:05:30 PM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: freedom44
AFAIK, Iran does not have any Mongol population fortunately.

These people are Afghani/Tajik workers in Tehran Azadi Sq.

15 posted on 09/18/2004 10:07:08 PM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran Told to Freeze Uranium Enrichment Programme



Iran has been told by the UN atomic watchdog agency to suspend work processes that could lead to the creation of nuclear weapons.
The 35-nation organisation has also set an indirect late Autumn deadline for Tehran to heed its conditions.

A resolution approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency’s board of governors said it “considers it necessary” that Iran freeze all uranium enrichment and related programs.

It also said it “strongly urges” Iran to meet all demands by the agency in its investigation of the country’s clandestine nuclear activity.

These include unrestricted access to sites, information and personnel that can shed light on still unanswered questions on whether Tehran was interested in the atom for nuclear weapons.

Suggesting that Iran may have to answer to the UN Security Council should it defy the demands, the resolution said the next board meeting in November “will decide whether or not further steps are appropriate” in ensuring Iran complies.

The US, which accuses Iran of using the argument of peaceful nuclear aims to acquire the technology to make weapons, praised the text even before it was passed.

“Iran remains completely isolated in its pursuit of nuclear weapons, and the draft resolution ... makes that clear,” US Under-secretary of State John Bolton said in a statement.

However, the resolution has left Iran with room to manoeuvre and raised the prospect of new confrontation with the US when the agency’s board of governors reconvene in late November.

While demanding Iran suspend all uranium enrichment activities, the resolution also recognises nations’ right to the peaceful use of nuclear energy – which Iran says is what it wants nuclear enrichment for.

Iran’s present suspension freeze falls short of international demands.

It says it is honouring a pledge not to put uranium hexafluoride gas into centrifuges, spin it and make enriched uranium. But the resolution calls for a stop as well to related activities, including a halt to making, assembling and testing centrifuges, and to producing uranium hexafluoride, the feed stock for enrichment.

It also expresses alarm at Iranian plans to convert more than 40 tons of raw uranium into uranium hexafluoride.

16 posted on 09/18/2004 11:32:33 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

FAHRENHEIT 9/11 DEBUTS IN TEHRAN

Last week, in the era before Rathergate, several readers emailed this incredibly revealing story about the premiere of Michael Moore’s agitprop mockumentary in Tehran.

In a nation that really feels the dictator’s boot on its neck, the audience knows, with the certain knowledge of the oppressed, why their oppressor is allowing them to watch this movie. But they don’t even see (or care about) Moore’s loathing for his own country.

They’re too exhilarated just to catch an unvarnished, uncensored glimpse of ... America: ‘Fahrenheit 9/11’ gets ‘axis of evil’ premiere.

TEHRAN (AFP) - Cinemagoers in the Iranian capital were given their first glimpse of ‘Fahrenheit 9/11’ this week, but appeared to enjoy more the rare chance to watch an American movie than its assault on their regime’s arch foe George W. Bush.

Michael Moore’s Bush-bashing polemic may have cruised through Iran’s unforgiving censors thanks to its indictment of US policy, but the premiere of the film also had the side effect of making some viewers relate the same questioning to their own state of affairs.

“The authorities obviously gave the film the green light for political reasons, in that anything against the United States must be good,” quipped one of the hundreds of mainly young people who flocked to Tuesday night’s opening screening.

The prize-winning documentary has been allowed out on release here to coincide with the third anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States — which kicked off a chain of events that has seen Iran surrounded by US troops and lumped into an “axis of evil”.

“They are showing this film to erase from our minds the idea that America is the great saviour,” said Hirad Harandian, another cinemagoer at the uptown Farhang cinema.  Thursday, September 16, 2004


17 posted on 09/19/2004 12:48:11 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

I went to watch that movie last night. Only one cinema shows the movie in Iran but I disagree with what AFP said about the movie. If Iranians want to watch an American movie, they can watch them through their satellite receivers. I think people are curious to see who says the truth.

I hope AFP does not ignore the facts.


18 posted on 09/19/2004 1:11:57 AM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: Khashayar

Khashayar, I would like to recommend that you download this expose on the film and give it to your friends. Let me know what you think about these "59 Deceits."

Independence Institute, http://www.independenceinstitute.org

Fifty-nine Deceits in Fahrenheit 9/11


By Dave Kopel

 

New movie: Farenhype 911. Go to http://www.fahrenhype911.com/ for details

Last revised: Sept. 4, 2004.

 

To the left is the poster for FarenHype 9/11 a new film which will released on DVD on October 5, 2004. Dave Kopel appears in the film. Click on the image or go to http://www.fahrenhype911.com/ for details and a trailer.

 

There is a Four-page PDF summary of "Fifty-nine Deceits in Fahrenheit 9/11," which you may reproduce freely.

You may also photocopy the full text of this report if you give it away for free.

 

French translation of the first part of this report; en FrancaisSwedish translation; Svensk översättning. Brazilian newspaper summary of this article, in Portuguese; Sumário do artigo no português.


This report was first posted on the web on the morning of July 1. Since then, I've revised several sections in response to reader requests for clarifications, and have added additional deceits which have been pointed out by readers or journalists. As a result, the number of listed deceits has been raised from 56 to 59.

 

Thanks to the readers who have written to point out additional deceits or to point out items which need clarification. Also thanks to the readers who have written in defense of Moore. Many such readers have been rational and civil. Moore's reasonable defenders have made two main points:

 

First, notwithstanding the specific falsehoods, isn't the film as a whole filled with many important truths?

 

Not really. We can divide the film into three major parts. The first part (Bush, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan) is so permeated with lies that most of the scenes amount to lies. The second, shortest part involves domestic issues and the USA PATRIOT Act. So far, I've identified only one clear falsehood in this segment (Rep. Porter Goss's toll-free number). So this part, at least arguably, presents useful information. The third part, on Iraq, has several outright falsehoods--such as the Saddam regime's murder of Americans, and the regime's connection with al Qaeda. Other scenes in the third part--such as Iraqi casualties, interviews with American soldiers, and the material on bereaved mother Lila Lipscomb--are not blatant lies; but the information presented is so extremely one-sided (the only Iraqi casualties are innocents, nobody in Iraq is grateful for liberation, all the American soldiers are disillusioned, except for the sadists) that the overall picture of the Iraq War is false.

Read the rest of the report by clicking on the link above...


19 posted on 09/19/2004 2:07:51 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

You are not going to get me banned, Are you? LoL

Any how, I have to tell you that in the end of the movie most people clapped for what Mr. Moore did.

Here in Iran, we hardly trust any thing foreign like your policies. I have nothing to do with your domestic issues but I should tell you there are many wrong things with your policies in the middle east.


20 posted on 09/19/2004 2:17:25 AM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: Khashayar

Like what exactly.


21 posted on 09/19/2004 2:24:39 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

I don't want to be named "Conspiracy Theorist".

Those are conspiracy theories to you and your people who have never been under rule of a puppet government. (although it is not conspiracy theory to us here)


22 posted on 09/19/2004 2:35:23 AM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: Khashayar

Sorry, but I don't understand your last statement. I was just asking what polices of the US in the Middle East are wrong?

You may be right, but what do you mean, specifically?


23 posted on 09/19/2004 3:23:12 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran refuses to freeze uranium enrichment


Sun 19 September, 2004 09:29

By Parisa Hafezi

TEHRAN (Reuters) - Iran has rejected a resolution from the U.N. nuclear watchdog that it should freeze uranium enrichment, and threatened to end snap checks of atomic facilities if its case were sent to the U.N. Security Council.

It said if the Council went as far as punishing Tehran with sanctions, Iran could follow North Korea and pull out of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty altogether.

Enriched uranium can be used to make atomic weapons. Washington says that is Iran's aim but Tehran says its nuclear programme is solely dedicated to generating electricity.

The U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) unanimously adopted a resolution on Saturday calling on Iran to suspend all uranium enrichment-related activities.

"Iran will not accept any obligation regarding the suspension of uranium enrichment," chief nuclear negotiator Hassan Rohani told a news conference on Sunday.

"No international body can force Iran to do so."

Rohani predicted a rough ride to the next IAEA board of governors meeting on November 25.

"This is a war, we may win or we may lose," said the mid-ranking cleric who sits as secretary-general of Iran's Supreme National Security Council.

He said Iran would stop allowing U.N. inspectors to make short-notice visits to its atomic facilities if the Islamic Republic's dossier were sent to the U.N. Security Council for possible sanctions.

"If they want to send Iran to the Security Council, it is not wise, and we will stop implementing the Additional Protocol," he said.

The Additional Protocol to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) allows snap nuclear checks. Iran is implementing its terms although parliament has not ratified it.

FOLLOWING NORTH KOREA

Rohani also warned Iran could pull out of the NPT if the Islamic Republic falls foul of the Security Council.

"If they impose economic sanctions, parliament may ask government to pull out of the NPT," he continued.

Iran agreed to suspend uranium enrichment-related activities last year after a visit to Tehran by foreign ministers from France, Britain and Germany, the so-called EU big three.

But the suspension lapsed. Iran said in July it had restarted building centrifuges and had recommenced work at a plant that produces uranium hexafluoride, the gas pumped into centrifuges.

Centrifuges enrich uranium by spinning it at supersonic speeds.

If enriched to a low level, uranium can be used to fuel nuclear power stations such as the one Iran is building at Bushehr on its south coast. If further enriched, it can be deployed in warheads.

Although it restarted these enrichment-related activities, Iran says it has not restarted enrichment itself.

But the Islamic Republic said its suspension agreement was made to the EU foreign ministers on a goodwill basis and insists it is permitted to get the process running at any stage.

24 posted on 09/19/2004 3:26:07 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

I prefer to write to you in freepmail.

Thnx


25 posted on 09/19/2004 4:47:05 AM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: Khashayar

I said they are Turkmen and historically they are ancestors of the Mongols.


26 posted on 09/19/2004 8:39:04 AM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Leader outlines IRGC's true identity


10:22:49 Þ.Ù
Tehran, Sept 19 - Supreme Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei deemed safeguarding the true identity of the Islamic Republic Guards Corps (IRGC) the most basic responsibility of its staff and commanders.

Making the remarks in the 16th nationwide gathering of IRGC commanders and officials in the northwestern city of Zanjan Saturday evening, he extended his congratulations to the nation on the birth anniversary of the third martyred Imam of Muslim Shiites Imam Hussein (AS) which is dubbed as the "Revolutionary Guards Day".

He described as a blessing the love of IRGC forces for their martyred Imam and stressed that the Islamic Republic System in Iran due to its religious qualities and also the religion-oriented culture of Iranian nation could never be defeated.

The Supreme Leader further referred to cultural transformation, continuous economic pressures, penetrating into political and cultural structures and paralyzing active members of society as some of the methods employed by the enemies to weaken the Islamic system in Iran.

Ayatollah Khamenei also pointed to the sensitive role of Iranian nation as well as the IRGC forces in setting up the future of Iran, the region and the Islamic world and defusing the plots of the big powers for the Middle East region.

Talking in the ceremony was IRGC commander Major General Seyyed Yahya Rahim Safavi who reiterated the readiness of IRGC forces in safeguarding the Islamic Revolution and the sacred system of the Islamic Republic.

He also described the Ashura-5 war games as very successful and hailed the cooperation of people of the three provinces where the maneuvers were taking place with the IRGC forces.

SR

27 posted on 09/19/2004 9:08:06 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Rowhani rejects suspension


12:00:09 È.Ù
Tehran, Sept 19 - The Islamic Republic of Iran refuse any resolution which binds it to suspend its uranium enrichment process, Secretary of the Supreme Council of the National Security (SCNC), Hassan Rowhani told reporters on Sunday.

Taking questions from reporters from home and abroad, Hassan Rowhani asserted that "no organization, including the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), enjoys the authority to deprive a country of its right to use peaceful nuclear energy.

"The situation today is different; at present, the IAEA has denied any swerving (from the right path) in Iran's nuclear activities", Rowhani said.

m/k

28 posted on 09/19/2004 9:10:10 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

The Daily Breeze

Confrontation with Iran looms

September 20, 2004

International jawboning aimed at dissuading Iran from developing nuclear weapons is failing. If diplomacy cannot be made to work, the United Nations Security Council must be prepared to try something tougher than talk.

Last fall, Iran's hard-line Islamic regime seemed willing to give up its clandestine, years-long program to develop nuclear weapons. Tehran announced that it would cooperate fully with the International Atomic Energy Agency, allow unfettered IAEA inspections and forgo the enrichment processes and capabilities that could produce weapons-grade uranium.

Forget all that. The IAEA now reports that Iran never honored these promises. Specifically, the Iranians never permitted the intrusive inspections needed as proof against telltale uranium enrichment. Furthermore, the IAEA says that Iran continues to work on portions of a nuclear program that could allow the production of nuclear weapons, and soon.

As a result, the IAEA has been drafting a resolution aimed at curbing Iran's access to technology that could be used to make nuclear weapons.

Iranian foreign minister Kamal Kharrazi has said Iran's nuclear program is limited to generating electricity, not weapons. But hardly anyone believes that. Why would Iran, awash in oil and natural gas, need to spend vast sums on developing nuclear power if, in fact, it has no plans to build nuclear weapons?

The United Nations' IAEA clearly believes that Iran's nuclear power program is a cover for developing nuclear weapons. The Bush administration has always believed that Iran is striving to become a nuclear-armed power, and thus dominate the oil-rich Persian Gulf. But Washington, preoccupied in Iraq, has let the Europeans and the United Nations take the lead on Iran.

As noted, diplomacy is failing to deter the Iranians from their long-term objective of achieving nuclear-weapons status. With Iran still ruled by a hard-line Islamist regime with a lengthy history of funding terrorism, Tehran's nuclear ambitions have to be vigorously resisted.

If the mullahs in Tehran continue to defy the IAEA, the U.N. Security Council can impose punishing economic sanctions against Iran. It needn't come to that if Iran's rulers can be brought to their senses. But any hope of deflecting Iran from its dangerous, destabilizing nuclear ambitions now requires, at the very least, a clear signal from the Security Council that sanctions are next unless Iran relents and abandons its uranium enrichment activities.


29 posted on 09/19/2004 9:22:29 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn


THE ROGUE THREAT


BY ROBERT S. LITWAK
Robert S. Litwak is director of international studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and author of "Rogue States and U.S. Foreign Policy."

September 19, 2004

As the recent mysterious explosion in North Korea reminded us, that country is believed to be on the verge of a nuclear test. In Iran, a less advanced but rapidly moving nuclear program is focused on producing fissile material for a bomb.

Though developments in both countries are alarming, the Bush administration is engaged diplomatically - directly with North Korea and indirectly with Iran - with no sense of urgency. These deadlocked, episodic contacts amount to negotiations without negotiating.

Have North Korea and Iran made irreversible decisions to acquire nuclear weapons? We don't know. But U.S. diplomacy can test the countries' intentions by giving each an unambiguous choice, with real upsides and downsides.

Given the odious character of these regimes, the cruel dilemma for the United States is that the key to getting them to forgo nuclear weapons may be offering them a guarantee that their regimes - unlike Saddam Hussein's - will survive.

Looming large in the backdrop, of course, is Iraq. Many in the Bush administration regarded that war as a "demonstration" conflict, exemplifying its post-9/11 doctrine of military preemption. But was the administration intending to signal that the Iraq precedent is relevant to the resolution of the nuclear crises with North Korea and Iran?

President George W. Bush laid down an ambitious marker when he declared that the United States would not "tolerate" the acquisition of nuclear weapons by Iran and North Korea - the other two charter members of his "axis of evil."

How that declaration translates into action within an administration openly divided between hard-liners and pragmatists remains unclear. A major cleavage dividing the two camps is whether the U.S. objective toward the countries should be regime change or behavior change.

Hard-liners thought the launching of the Iraq war - with its warning of disarm or be overthrown - could compel Iran and North Korea to give up their weapons of mass destruction. One senior administration official in this camp, asked after the fall of Baghdad what the message of the Iraq war was for Iran's theocratic regime, replied: "Take a number."

Administration pragmatists by contrast characterized the Iraq war not as the new paradigm, but rather as an extraordinary remedy for a unique case. They are concerned that the "take a number" approach, instead of compelling Pyongyang and Tehran to roll back nuclear programs, could encourage both to accelerate weapons development in hopes of deterring an American attack.

Administration officials assert that they do not have a "cookie-cutter" strategy in dealing with the "axis of evil" members. But the fundamental question is whether they have a cookie-cutter mindset that precludes meaningful negotiations.

The "take a number" approach may reflect what many in the administration wish they could do with the rogue regimes in North Korea and Iran, but the United States is constrained in both cases in its use of force. Both regimes are domestically entrenched and neither is in imminent danger of collapse.



Even military action targeted just at nuclear facilities would be problematic. As in the 1990s in North Korea, a military strike on nuclear facilities would probably trigger a general war on the Korean peninsula.

In Iran, any military action faces formidable logistical and intelligence hurdles (recall the failed U.S. hostage rescue mission in 1980).

Moreover, a strike on Iran's nuclear facilities would likely generate a powerful anti-American backlash that would set back any prospects for domestic political reform that might turn the country away from its support of Middle East terrorism.

The Bush administration's hand is also tied by the credibility crisis for U.S. intelligence in the wake of the failure to uncover WMD stockpiles in post-war Iraq and the split in support for the Iraq war in the United States.

However reluctantly, under the circumstances, the administration has opted to address the two nuclear proliferation threats through multilateral diplomacy: with North Korea directly, via the six-party talks (involving South Korea, Japan, China, and Russia), and with Iran indirectly, through the International Atomic Energy Agency and European Union foreign ministers.

This is forcing an alternative strategy from the one of regime change and military preemption used against Iraq to deterrence and reassurance of regime survival.



What does this mean in practice? The United States needs to give North Korea and Iran a stark, structured choice between the penalties for non-compliance and the tangible benefits of behavior change - for North Korea, a substantial aid package, for Iran, the lifting of sanctions. The United States must leave the regimes a political exit by being prepared to provide each of them a security guarantee of nonaggression and noninterference.

For an American president who said, "I loathe Kim Jong Il," the North Korean leader, a policy of reassurance will not come easily. Nor will it be easily accepted.

Consider Kim Jong Il's behavior during the Iraq war, when he disappeared from public sight for 50 days, evidently believing that the deployment of additional bombers to the Korean theater to bolster deterrence was the prelude to air strikes that would decapitate his regime (much as air strikes were launched to topple the Saddam Hussein regime).

But there is already a precedent for this kind of solution in the case of Libya. This is the only instance so far of "rogue state" reintegration.

In December 2003, the world was stunned by the joint announcement from Washington and London that Col. Moamar Gadhafi had agreed to dismantle his regime's WMD programs and to submit to international inspections.

Libya, President Bush declared, would be permitted to rejoin "the family of nations." The administration credited Gadhafi's dramatic change to the demonstration effect of the Iraq war. But this was not the only factor.

That war followed a decade-long campaign by the Libyan leader for diplomatic rehabilitation.

What sealed the deal for the United States was Libya's change in behavior with respect to terrorism and proliferation; what sealed the deal for Libya was an American assurance of regime survival.

In short: With Libya, to the surprise of many, the United States was prepared, as one former senior official put it, "to take yes for an answer."

The open question is whether the Bush administration would be prepared to do the same for North Korea and Iran.

Ironically, the Libyan case, more than that of Iraq, could be the key precedent for North Korea and Iran. The United States' willingness to forgo the objective of overt regime change in the face of meaningful behavioral change could lead them to conclude that a Libya-type deal, however guarded and gradual, would be in their best interest.

To prevent cheating, the challenge is to make the agreement as transparent and verifiable as possible.



The stakes could not be higher, and regrettably, in a U.S. election year, progress is unlikely.

A news report last week said that the North Koreans are waiting for the American election to be over before agreeing to a date for the resumption of the six-party talks.

Nonproliferation experts now believe we are at a nuclear "tipping point." In the past, the addition of another state to the nuclear club did not have a cascading effect. The consequences were either regionally contained or managed through U.S. security assurances to worried allies.

Those conditions may no longer hold in the post 9/11 world.

Today, if North Korea or Iran were to obtain nuclear weapons, the action could lead several other nations in their regions - Saudi Arabia and Egypt, South Korea and Japan - to do the same.

And that could well bring a disastrous end to nonproliferation and nuclear restraint globally.

30 posted on 09/19/2004 9:30:20 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran's total government revenues drop


Mena Report - Business Section
Sep 19, 2004

Iran's total government revenues amounted to Rls 42,956 billion in the first quarter of the current Iranian year (started March 20), reported the Central Bank of Iran (CBI) Saturday.

The represents a 22.6 percent drop compared to the figure for in same period last year, it added, according to IRIB.

Of this sum, Rls 14,030 billion were revenues from direct and indirect taxation which again was 41.5 percent lower.

In addition, Rls 28,926 billion were generated from other sources showing a 8.2 percent fall compared to the figure for the same period last year.

31 posted on 09/19/2004 9:35:21 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Supreme Leader monitors troop movements at Ashura 5 war games


Tehran Times - Politics Section
Sep 19, 2004

TEHRAN -- Supreme Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei on Saturday inspected the latest stage of the most recent military exercise of the Basij (volunteer) forces.

Twelve of divisions of the Basij supported by Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) troops participated in the Ashura 5 grand military exercise in western Iran for the past eight days.

The Basij carried out a military exercise against a hypothetical enemy in an area of 60,000 square kilometers.

The magnitude of the military exercise has been unprecedented in terms of the involvement of armored divisions, helicopter gun ships, and paratroopers.

The Supreme Leader visited the command center in Zanjan province to monitor the performance of the troops.

32 posted on 09/19/2004 9:38:21 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

33 posted on 09/19/2004 9:29:29 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: freedom44

Believe me, they are not Iranians. They are foreign workers (mostly Uzbik, Tajik & Afghanis) working in Construction sites of different cities of Iran.

I have been to Turkeman sahra of Iran. They are different than these guys.


34 posted on 09/19/2004 11:30:44 PM PDT by Khashayar (Learn Geography!)
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To: Khashayar
Turkmens aren't Iranians? So Khodadad Azizi isn't Iranian?


35 posted on 09/19/2004 11:41:58 PM PDT by freedom44
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