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Still burning bright (Texas bulb first illuminated in 1908)
CNN ^ | 9/20/04 | (Reuters)

Posted on 09/24/2004 9:22:00 PM PDT by Nail

DALLAS, Texas (Reuters) -- They sure do not make things anymore like the Texas lightbulb that sold for a few cents and has burned for 96 straight years.

The North Fort Worth Historical Society will have a birthday party Tuesday for its famous household fixture -- a lightbulb that has burned continuously since September 21, 1908. The bulb was first illuminated when a stagehand at a local opera house flicked a switch and posted a sign that the light over a stage entrance was not be turned off.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: invention

No picture available on the light bulb above. This is the Livermore bulb, which is about as old.

(Wanted to post this in chat, but don't know how to).

 

1 posted on 09/24/2004 9:22:01 PM PDT by Nail
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To: Nail

Livermore is older than the Texas bulb by like 6 years.


2 posted on 09/24/2004 9:23:40 PM PDT by pcgTheDestroyer
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To: Nail
They sure do not make things anymore like the Texas lightbulb

Thankfully, that thing is nearly worthless or anything serious!

3 posted on 09/24/2004 9:24:41 PM PDT by _Jim (s <--- Ann C. and Rush L. speak on gutless Liberals (RealAudio files))
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To: Nail

"They sure do not make things anymore like the Texas lightbulb that sold for a few cents and has burned for 96 straight years."

Manufacturers certainly might learn a few things from the past.

I have a General Electric upright freezer purchased in 1952. Still running strong. But not continuously. I confess. Every once in awhile I unplug the thing for an afternoon defrosting.


4 posted on 09/24/2004 9:30:44 PM PDT by Racehorse
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To: Racehorse

If you upgraded to a modern freezer you'd probably save enough money on electricity to pay for the new freezer in a year.


5 posted on 09/24/2004 9:33:25 PM PDT by flashbunny (How do you tell which polls are right? Simple. Just look at how the Kerry campaign is acting.)
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To: flashbunny

Would that savings include the cost of an extended maintenance agreements, assuming of course, the new freezer outlasts the warranty?


6 posted on 09/24/2004 9:40:07 PM PDT by Racehorse
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To: Racehorse
put it this way: If you can afford to buy a new freezer every year or so due to $$$ savings, who cares about extended maintenance agreements? Most likely if it's going to fail, it's going to fail within the warranty period. And after the warranty period ends, you'll probably have recouped your savings. Every month after that is just gravy.

Getting rid of the old 50's fridge / freezer for a modern one several years ago has already paid for itself in reduced energy bills. Plus not having to defrost it every month or so saves me even more in time and trouble. Oh, and not having to listen it constantly running is another big plus.
7 posted on 09/24/2004 9:48:15 PM PDT by flashbunny (How do you tell which polls are right? Simple. Just look at how the Kerry campaign is acting.)
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To: pcgTheDestroyer
Livermore is older than the Texas bulb by like 6 years.

I think that's right. Livermore was 1901, while this bulb was 1908. Still, this bulb has been burning for (2004-1908)=96*365*24 hours=840,000 hours. The average life of an incandescent light bulb is what, 1000 - 2000 hours?

8 posted on 09/24/2004 9:52:34 PM PDT by Nail
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To: Nail

Get outta here ... really?!


9 posted on 09/24/2004 9:53:51 PM PDT by Mr. Buzzcut
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To: Nail

The Livermore bulb is in a firehouse. But that can't be right, can it? Bush closed all our firehouses and opened then in Iraq. ;>)


10 posted on 09/24/2004 10:06:50 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Nail

Yup, and even the fancy schmancy ones are like 8000 hours. One thing about the Livermore bulb which might not apply to this one: Livermore is *FOUR* watts. (I think I heard this one was sixty, but I might be confused.)


11 posted on 09/24/2004 10:08:40 PM PDT by pcgTheDestroyer
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To: Mr. Buzzcut
Hey, Mr.B.

I've no idea what you mean. I was just chatting about light bulbs.

But I like your home page, and I share your love for a good cigar.

 

12 posted on 09/24/2004 10:11:51 PM PDT by Nail
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To: Nail; blam
A 1970s edition of the Guinness Book listed a light bulb in a fire house (maybe in California?) as the longest burning. It had only been switched off once -- to move to the new facility -- was then screwed back in and turned back on. Turning 'em on and off does put more strain on bulbs, but that can't be the only reason for the longevity... :')
George W. Bush will be reelected by a margin of at least ten per cent

13 posted on 09/24/2004 10:12:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
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To: flashbunny

I don't mind defrosting the thing every six months or so. The quiet humming is soothing and almost musical. I like owning something so well designed and so well put together it still does its intended job after almost fifty-two years.

I might even go out and give it a good clean-up polish tomorrow.

Whatever extra expense there might be, I think I'll pay it for awhile longer.

But percentage-wise, I am curious, how much did you save?


14 posted on 09/24/2004 10:18:11 PM PDT by Racehorse
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To: Nail
I've no idea what you mean. I was just chatting about light bulbs.

Yeah, i was just amazed ...!

Enjoying an Arturo Fuente Double Chateau right now (till Ms. B smells it!) ... ahhhh! ;)

15 posted on 09/24/2004 10:19:32 PM PDT by Mr. Buzzcut
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To: Racehorse; flashbunny

Anybody remember the "Andy Griffith" episode with the old freezer? If not ... carry on! :)


16 posted on 09/24/2004 10:21:22 PM PDT by Mr. Buzzcut
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To: SunkenCiv
Right, that's the Livermore bulb.

 

More info here.

17 posted on 09/24/2004 10:32:19 PM PDT by Nail
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To: SunkenCiv; Nail; pcgTheDestroyer; _Jim; Racehorse; flashbunny; Mr. Buzzcut; ProtectOurFreedom
It had only been switched off once -- to move to the new facility -- was then screwed back in and turned back on. Turning 'em on and off does put more strain on bulbs, but that can't be the only reason for the longevity... :')

Is the bulb on AC or DC current? AC will cause the filiment to eventually fail due to metal fatigue similar to turning a light on and off.

18 posted on 09/24/2004 10:43:49 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative (Hey! Hey! Ho! Ho! Dan Rather's got to go!)
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To: Nail

Thanks!


19 posted on 09/24/2004 11:08:37 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
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To: Paleo Conservative

Some few years ago, in (I think it was) Builder's Square, I saw a display of those AC to DC adapters for light sockets. DC does extend the life of a bulb. However, the heavier the filament (and of course, depends what it's made of), the longer it lasts. Hence, I used to buy 130 volt, or oven / ceiling fan bulbs, despite the higher cost. Now I get those twisty fluorescents. :')


20 posted on 09/24/2004 11:10:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
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To: Nail
Nice article.

I live in a decent area of Nashville where the homes start around 350-400K.

Mine was built in 1962 and I bought in from the original owner in 2001.

I still have all of the original appliances from the kitchen and heating.....Trane AC is new and I replaced the old upright Fridge last year with a big black Frigidaire that was cheap and works great.

My oven is a 50s model Westinghouse...no such animal anymore...the elements are a bitch to find.

My stove top is an old 50s porcelain GE gas range...works great.

Disposal is an old Insinkerator as is the very old dishwasher.

I could go out and buy fancy German or Italian appliances but WTF....I like old stuff that keeps on working well enough....it has a certain charm....at least for me.
21 posted on 09/24/2004 11:18:35 PM PDT by wardaddy
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To: Mr. Buzzcut

"Anybody remember the "Andy Griffith" episode with the old freezer? If not ... carry on! :)"

I'd call The Man.


22 posted on 09/24/2004 11:20:05 PM PDT by Racehorse
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To: Racehorse
I'd call The Man.

"Aunt Bea call the Man. Just .. call the Man!"

Love that ep!

23 posted on 09/25/2004 6:30:40 AM PDT by Mr. Buzzcut
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To: Nail

Its all about the filament. LEDs are in the near future.


24 posted on 09/25/2004 6:37:12 AM PDT by ▀udda▀udd (7 days - 7 ways < Preserve America ! >)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
The Livermore bulb is in a firehouse. But that can't be right, can it? Bush closed all our firehouses and opened then in Iraq.

Yeah... but he left strict orders to leave the lights on.

25 posted on 09/25/2004 6:44:07 AM PDT by uglybiker (Urrrrrrgh! Kerry! Baaaaaaaad!!!!!!..................Frank N. Stein)
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To: Racehorse
I have a General Electric upright freezer purchased in 1952. Still running strong. But not continuously. I confess. Every once in awhile I unplug the thing for an afternoon defrosting.

I had a late 40's Firestone Freezer that did a wonderful job until last year. The handle finally rotted off and broke and I reluctantly threw it away. Yes you had to defrost it about once a year, but it was a trooper that never had to be repaired.

I did some research on it and old freezers are in great demand. The newer models were no more electrical saving than the old ones. Frost free is not cost free.

I would hold on to yours as long as it preformed it duty. Probable as long as the door handle still works.

26 posted on 09/25/2004 6:55:01 AM PDT by LowOiL (Christian and proud of it !)
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To: Paleo Conservative
Is the bulb on AC or DC current? AC will cause the filiment to eventually fail due to metal fatigue similar to turning a light on and off.
Interesting experiment to try sometime - configure a low resistance current 'shunt' in series with a light bulb to the 'Neutral' side of the line and connect to CH 1 of an O-scope (oscilloscope),

- connect CH 2 to the 'high' side (hot) line voltage.

Switch on the power, note the deviation from 'pure' sinusoid over an entire sinsusoid ...

Connect a diode in series with the high side, and note the deviation from 'pure' sinusoid ... you will see a BIGGER difference now that the bulb's filament is 'warmed' by only half the incoming AC and cools during the other ... this will shed 'some light' on what the thermal time constant of a filament is ...

Next, switch off the power, set the scope from 'Auto Trigger' to 'Norm Trigger' (we're going to WATCH the huge inrush current when a cold bulb is switch on) ... now, switch power ON and OFF several times: note the HUGE currents drawn by the filament when it's *cold* and the incomig AC is at it's peak (1.414 * 120 V rms = 17V pk) -

- eventually, when the bulb gets older as the filament has thinned, this will turn out to be 'fusing' current ... an incandescent lamp can pull a "cold-filament" inrush current of 10 to 20 times the steady-state "hot filament" current ...

Simply applying 'DC' in place of AC won't cure this phenom - there needs to be a way to sloooowly apply the power ....

Zero crossing thyristors actully work quite well - I've got a hall light that seems well on it's way to 'running forever' - it's one of those BSR X-10 wall switches, and when they turn on a lamp, they do it at the 'zero crossing' point of the incoming AC sinusoid ...

27 posted on 09/25/2004 6:59:56 AM PDT by _Jim (s <--- Ann C. and Rush L. speak on gutless Liberals (RealAudio files))
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To: Nail

I have the bulb that hung in the hallway of my grandparents house in the Houston Heights and burned continuously from about 1908 until 1965 when my grandfather died. The last time I tried it a few years ago it still worked. I also have a red bulb of the same period that he said came from a ships lantern, it also still works.


28 posted on 09/25/2004 7:00:11 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: flashbunny

I think you missed the point. A freezer that is almost 50 years old - and still running strong, while modern appliances don't typically last 1/5 that long without some sort of major repairs.

Kind of like the old Kenmore Washer and Dryer my parents had while I was growing up. When they loaned it to a family member, the pair was over 25 years old and had never had any repair work done.

I haven't seen a similar product sold in the last 15 years that lasted more than a couple of years (usually about the length of the warranty + a month).

It really puzzles me how these appliances are suppose to be more efficient, partially because they don't have to work as hard - yet they don't last as long.


29 posted on 09/25/2004 8:35:21 AM PDT by TheBattman (Islam - the cult of Satan - The DemocRAT Party= Acolytes of SATAN)
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To: Nail

I remember when the Texas theater (an old vaudeville and movie house) in San Antonio was torn down a few years ago, a light bulb high in the wings was found to be still burning. Apparently it had been on for God knows how many years.


30 posted on 09/25/2004 10:06:38 AM PDT by wildbill
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To: _Jim
Thankfully, that thing is nearly worthless or anything serious!

Huh?

31 posted on 09/25/2004 10:07:30 AM PDT by Lazamataz ("Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown" -- harpseal)
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To: flashbunny

extended warranties are usually not a good investment


32 posted on 09/25/2004 10:11:14 AM PDT by cowtowney
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To: cowtowney

The only thing I get them on now is laptops, just because there's not much you or anyone local can do when it goes bad - it usually has to be fixed the the manufacturer.


33 posted on 09/25/2004 10:19:57 AM PDT by flashbunny (How do you tell which polls are right? Simple. Just look at how the Kerry campaign is acting.)
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To: Nail
Not worth its own thread, but this piece of news is a bit related to what we discussed here:

 

130-year-old Chinese fire put out

A fire that broke out more than 100 years ago at a Chinese coalfield has finally been extinguished, reports say.

In the last four years, firefighters have spent $12m in efforts to put out the flames at Liuhuanggou colliery, near Urumqi in Xinjiang province.

While ablaze, the fire burned up an estimated 1.8m tons of coal every year, according to China's official Xinhua news agency.

Local historians said the fire first broke out in 1874, Itar-Tass reported.

Hou Xuecheng, head of the Xinjiang Coalfield Firefighting Project Office, said the Liuhuanggou fire was the largest among eight major coalfield fire areas in Xinjiang.

The burning coal emitted 100,000 tons of harmful gases - including carbon monoxide and sulphur dioxide - and 40,000 tons of ashes every year, Mr Hou told Xinhua.

The continuing blaze is also thought to have caused environmental damage to the region.

Xinjiang accounts for 1.8 trillion tons, or 40.6%, of China's total coal reserves.

34 posted on 11/10/2004 6:29:54 PM PST by Nail
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