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Iranian Alert - September 29, 2004 [EST]- IRAN LIVE THREAD - "Americans for Regime Change in Iran"
Americans for Regime Change in Iran ^ | 9.29.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 09/28/2004 9:01:45 PM PDT by DoctorZIn

The US media still largely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” As a result, most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East. In fact they were one of the first countries to have spontaneous candlelight vigils after the 911 tragedy (see photo).

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. I began these daily threads June 10th 2003. On that date Iranians once again began taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Today in Iran, most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin



TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: armyofmahdi; ayatollah; cleric; humanrights; iaea; insurgency; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; iraq; islamicrepublic; jayshalmahdi; journalist; kazemi; khamenei; khatami; khatemi; lsadr; moqtadaalsadr; mullahs; persecution; persia; persian; politicalprisoners; protests; rafsanjani; revolutionaryguard; rumsfeld; satellitetelephones; shiite; southasia; southwestasia; studentmovement; studentprotest; terrorism; terrorists; wot
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin

1 posted on 09/28/2004 9:01:47 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 09/28/2004 9:03:25 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Would Israel go it alone
if sanctions on Iran fail?

By Leslie Susser
JERUSALEM, Sept. 28 (JTA) — After months of high-profile lobbying against Iran’s nuclear program, Israeli officials are confident that the international community will impose sanctions on Tehran if it fails to meet a Nov. 25 deadline to halt its nuclear weapons program.

They base their optimism on a series of meetings with American and European officials, mainly during the recent U.N. General Assembly session in New York. They say they detect a major shift in the European position, which could lead to the Europeans joining a U.S.-led move on sanctions at the U.N. Security Council.

If the sanctions fail, Israeli analysts believe the United States has the capacity to stop Iran going nuclear by military means. They are also not ruling out a strike by Israel, if the Iranians go past the point of no return in nuclear bomb manufacturing and the international community fails to take effective action.

Israeli officials, however, make it clear that Israel sees Iran’s nuclear program as a global rather than an Israeli problem, and would much prefer to see the international community dealing with it.

The hardening of the European line came after the Iranians rejected a mid-September demand from the International Atomic Energy Agency not to produce the enriched uranium from which nuclear bombs are made.

The defiant Iranian response was to announce that it had begun converting large amounts of raw uranium and that it had test-fired a new version of the Shihab-3 missile, capable of reaching Israel and most European capitals.

A few days later, at the U.N. General Assembly session in New York, Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom said he was encouraged by the new European stance.

The time, he said, was now ripe “to move the Iranian case to the Security Council in order to put an end to this nightmare.”

At the same time, Israel’s national security council chief, Giora Eiland, came away from talks with American officials convinced that they realized the gravity of the situation and would be ready to act.

November, Eiland stressed in his talks, would be the very last chance to do something effective to halt the Iranian nuclear drive without having to resort to force.

Gerald Steinberg, an expert on nuclear proliferation at Bar Ilan University’s BESA Institute, asserts that the Europeans, tired of Iran’s double game, will now be ready to follow an American lead.

“The British, the Germans and to some degree the French now realize that their approach, holding various kinds of dialogue with Iran, has failed,” he said.

Nor does he expect Russia or China to oppose a move for U.N. sanctions against Iran. “Russia, given its troubles in Chechnya, will find it difficult to condone a nuclear build-up in terror-supporting Iran,” he said.

“And China won’t want to be the only permanent member of the Security Council to allow Iran to develop nuclear weapons.”

Steinberg estimates that the Iranians are at least six months and perhaps some years away from producing a bomb, so that there is time to test whether a sanctions strategy works.

If it doesn’t, the next step could be an American-led military strike. Spelling out U.S. policy in late September, President Bush said he would prefer to use diplomacy, including sanctions, to stop the Iranian nuclear drive, but if necessary he would not shy away from the use of force.

A leak in Newsweek magazine that American contingency plans to hit Iran were being updated seemed to underline the president’s message.

Both the president’s tough talk and the Newsweek leak seemed calculated at the very least to put more pressure on Iran ahead of the November deadline, by presenting a credible U.S. military threat.

Although Iranian nuclear facilities are spread out across the country, and in some cases protected by thick concrete bunkers, Steinberg believes that if sanctions don’t work and the Iranians get very close to producing a bomb, the Americans would be capable of destroying Iran’s entire nuclear program.

“The U.S. certainly has the military capability to destroy the key facilities of the Iranian program,” he said. “Iran could always reconstitute its capabilities, but it would take years. Two decades after the Israeli strike against the Iraqi nuclear reactor at Osirak in 1981, the Iraqis were still not as close to producing a weapon as they had been then.”

As for the possibility of Israel attacking Iran’s nuclear facilities if sanctions fail and the international community does not take military action, Steinberg said he does not rule it out, “nor does anyone in the Israeli establishment.”

But he said the imminent supply of 500 one-ton “bunker buster” bombs to Israel from the United States should not be seen as directly connected to any operational policy vis-a-vis Iran, “although it does enhance the credibility of the Israeli threat to Iran’s nuclear program.”

Senior Israeli officials warn that the international community should not count on Israel to remove the Iranian nuclear threat. Israeli policy, they say, has been geared to convincing the international community that Iran’s nuclear program is an international and not an Israeli problem, and that it should be dealt with by the international community, not by Israel.

“The world should not wait for us to do its ‘dirty work,’ ” by taking out the Iranian nuclear threat, Yoav Biran, the outgoing director-general of the Israeli Foreign Ministry, warned in a recent interview in the mass circulation Yediot Achronot daily.

“No one in the world has any doubts about Iran’s intentions, which remain to achieve full military nuclear capability with long-range missiles,” he said, alluding to the goal of delivering nuclear warheads.

“It’s not solely an Israeli problem. First and foremost, it’s a problem for the stability of the Middle East and the whole international order. Only persistent international pressure, which must include Europe, the United States and others, will prevent Iran from achieving its goal,” he declared.

Now, after years in which the Americans pressed for a hard line and the Europeans for “constructive dialogue” with Iran, the international community seems to be ready to take the kind of concerted action Biran had in mind.

But whether sanctions or the threat of sanctions will be enough to convince the Iranians to drop their nuclear ambitions remains an open question.

And, despite President Bush’s tough talk and the new optimism in Israel, there is an even bigger question: If sanctions fail, will the international community really take military action, or wait for Israel, armed with long-range bombers and “bunker busting” bombs, to do so — and risk the consequences?

(Leslie Susser is the diplomatic correspondent for the Jerusalem Report.)


3 posted on 09/28/2004 9:03:50 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn


Analysis: Iranian Mujahedin Face Uncertain Future

- Tuesday, 28 September 2004


Iran -- map
Demonstrations against perceived U.S. injustices are nothing new in Iran. The demonstration that took place on 9 September in front of the U.S. interests section of the Swiss Embassy in Tehran, however, was different. This time, relatives of Iranian oppositionists who are based in Iraq were demanding help from the United States and the International Committee of the Red Cross in getting information about their family members, Reuters reported. The oppositionists -- members of the Mujahedin Khalq Organization (MKO or MEK) -- are located at Camp Ashraf, which is some 100 kilometers north of Baghdad.

The MKO was designated a "foreign terrorist organization" by the U.S. State Department in 1997, and it retains that status (see http://www.state.gov/s/ct/rls/pgtrpt/2003/31711.htm). The MKO is known by a number of other names, including the National Liberation Army of Iran (the militant wing of the MKO), the People's Mujahedin of Iran, National Council of Resistance, the National Council of Resistance of Iran, and Muslim Iranian Student's Society (front organization used to garner financial support). The EU designated the MKO's military wing as a terrorist organization in May 2002.

The MKO was created in the 1960s and its ideology combines Islam and Marxism. It was involved with anti-U.S. terrorism in the 1970s, and it initially supported the 1978-79 revolution. In June 1981, it staged an unsuccessful uprising against the Islamic regime; many members were imprisoned while others fled the country.

The MKO transitioned from being a "mass movement" in 1981 to having "all the main attributes of a cult" by mid-1987, Ervand Abrahamian wrote in his "Radical Islam: The Iranian Mojahedin" (1989). It referred to its head, Masud Rajavi, as the rahbar (leader) and imam-i hal (present imam), had a rigid hierarchy, created a vocabulary, and had its own calendar.

After being run out of Iran, the MKO launched a number of attacks against the regime leadership: a 1981 bombing killed President Mohammad-Ali Rajai and Prime Minister Mohammad-Javad Bahonar, in 1992 it attacked 13 Iranian embassies, and it is behind other mortar attacks and assassination attempts in Iran.

Former President Saddam Hussein granted the MKO refuge in Iraq, and from there the organization fought Iranian forces in the Iran-Iraq War. Hundreds of MKO members reportedly died in the July 1988 Foruq-i Javidan military operation against Iran. The MKO helped suppress the 1991 uprisings of Shi'a in southern Iraq and Kurds in the north.

Operation Iraqi Freedom brought the MKO's idyll to an end. U.S. and British aircraft bombed MKO bases in late March 2003 and again in early April. On 10 May, the MKO agreed to turn over its weapons to U.S. forces. As these events were taking place, there was speculation that the Iranian military would strike at the MKO's bases. It did not do so, and Tehran offered an amnesty instead.

Ahmad Rahimi, spokesman for Iran's Ministry of Intelligence and Security, said in a 28 March 2003 telephone interview with Dubai-based Al-Arabiyah television that members of the MKO could come back to Iran if they voiced regret for their "crimes" against the Islamic Republic, Reuters reported. "The Islamic Republic of Iran, out of pity, gave them this new chance," Rahimi said. "We guarantee their life and will not arrest them, although there are some people who committed special crimes inside and outside Iran. If they voice regret for what they did and do not repeat these mistakes, then we will help them solve the problem and lead a respectable life in their country," he added.

Other Iranian officials repeated the amnesty offer throughout the year. Intelligence and Security Minister Hojatoleslam Ali Yunesi said on 5 April that 100 MKO members had returned to Iran already, the Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) reported, and he urged others to return and live a normal life. Yunesi added during a 10 May press conference that many MKO members have returned to Iran and provided the government with information. Government spokesman Abdullah Ramezanzadeh said on 23 June 2003 that Iran would treat any returning MKO members with "Islamic compassion" and he stressed that they would not encounter any problems in Iran, IRNA reported. President Mohammad Khatami expressed similar sentiments in Geneva on 11 December 2003.

The offer did not apply to MKO leaders, however. "Monafeqin [hypocrites; MKO] ringleaders who have directly been involved in terrorist operations and crimes against the Iranian people" are not eligible for the amnesty, Ramezanzadeh added on 23 June.

The Iraqi Governing Council, furthermore, announced in December 2003 that all MKO members would have to leave Iraq by the end of the month (on Iraqi attitudes to the MKO, see "RFE/RL Iran Report," 15 December 2003.) The expulsions never occurred, and the occupation forces in Iraq were not clear on how to deal with the MKO (see "RFE/RL Iran Report," 22 December 2003). In July 2004, MKO members in Iraq were granted "protected status" under the Geneva Conventions. It is not clear, furthermore, how many MKO members took advantage of the Iranian amnesty offer, nor is it clear how they are being treated.

The case of two MKO members who were forcibly returned to Iran from Syria could be instructive. Damascus sent Ebrahim Khodabandeh and Jamil Bassam to Iran on 12 June 2003. During a February 2004 trip to Iran, Baroness Emma Nicholson, deputy chairwoman of the European Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee, saw the two men. She reported that they were in good health and had no complaints about their treatment, but were still awaiting trial. Nicholson met with Khodabandeh again in Tehran in March 2004. The MKO dismissed her comments as lies and said the men were being tortured and faced execution (see http://www.thisishertfordshire.co.uk/news/barnet/display.var.485040.0.0.php and http://www.thisishertfordshire.co.uk/news/barnet/display.var.490780.0.one_year_in_an_iranian_prison_cell.php).

Ann Singleton, author of a book on the MKO entitled "Saddam's Private Army," wrote in June 2004 that she and British Members of Parliament Sir Teddy Taylor and Win Griffiths, an independent British reporter, and two Iranian lawyers met with Khodabandeh and Bassam in Tehran's Evin prison (http://www.iran-interlink.org/files/info/iranvisitJune2004.htm). Khodabandeh told the visitors that he would not return to the MKO. Bassam said he still regards himself as an MKO member.

An imprisoned former MKO member, Arash Sametipur, was quoted in "The Christian Science Monitor" on 31 December 2003 that the organization is "a mixture of Mao and Marxism, and leader [Masud] Rajavi acts like Stalin" (http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/1231/p10s01-woiq.html). Another former MKO member, Hora Shalchi, told the newspaper that the organization's leadership promised that the Iranian people would welcome her actions, but a mob chased her down when her mortar attack on a military base went awry. "We weren't accepted by anybody," Shalchi added. "There was no support." Both said that the Iranian government does not consider the MKO a serious threat, and the executions that the MKO told them to expect never took place. According to the many people interviewed by "The Christian Science Monitor," imprisoned MKO members are treated like people who need help.

Yet this was not always the case, and MKO warnings were based on fact. Many MKO members who were imprisoned in the early 1980s were tortured into recanting, Ervand Abrahamian wrote in his "Tortured Confessions" (1999). Furthermore, in early or mid-1988 Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini issued an order establishing special commissions tasked with executing imprisoned mujahedin as muharib (at war with God) and leftists as mortad (apostates from Islam). In July 1988, the commissions began isolating and questioning the imprisoned MKO members and executing the unrepentant ones. The total number of executed mujahedin is estimated to be in the thousands. The mass executions stopped in less than a year and the logic behind them is not known, but Abrahamian wrote that this was Khomeini's way of testing the dedication of regime supporters. Others linked the executions with the MKO's unsuccessful July 1988 attack on Iran. And if executions became less commonplace, the use of torture did not.

In 1989 the regime amnestied many political prisoners. It produced one high-ranking MKO member, Said Shahsavandi, who in television interviews, lectures, and open letters denounced the MKO and accused its leadership of imprisoning, torturing, and executing dissidents. Shahsavandi traveled to Europe to deliver the same message. The MKO has denounced Shahsavandi for alleged involvement in the torture and execution of MKO members.

This policy of granting amnesties reflected a new regime tactic rather than a sense of mercy. The regime sought to portray the MKO as "the principal violators of human rights in Iran," Reza Afshari wrote in "Human Rights in Iran" (2001). Moreover, it tried to portray itself as a defender of human rights. The regime subsequently trotted out allegedly repentant MKO members, as well as relatives of individuals who allegedly died at the MKO's hands, when UN human rights investigators visited Iran.

As of late September, the future of the MKO is unclear. Iraqis continue to have suspicions about the organization. Baghdad's "Al-Mutamar" reported on 31 July that people in Diyala Governorate suspect the MKO is "fomenting the ongoing struggle between the new Iraqi government and the armed terrorist groups," and others suspect that Ba'athist officials are hiding in Camp Ashraf. The newspaper added that the MKO is not confined to Camp Ashraf and also runs Camp Habib, 35 kilometers north of Al-Basrah; Camp Homayun and Camp Muzarmi, near the city of Al-Amarah; Camp Fayzah, near Al-Kut; Camp Ulwi, near Al-Miqdadiyah; Camp Anzali, near Jalul; and "scores" of offices and safehouses in Baghdad, Al-Basrah, and Diyala.

Some U.S. commentators have recommended using the MKO against Iran, citing concerns about Iranian activities in Iraq. A recent example is the commentary by Fox News military analysts Thomas McInerney and Paul Vallely in "The Wall Street Journal" on 8 September. Citing former MKO spokesman Alireza Jafarzadeh as an "Iranian expert," they wrote that it is time to create an "armed resistance movement" by removing the MKO from the terrorist list. "It's time to rearm [the MKO's] 4,000 trained fighters."

Regardless of Iranians' disgust for this organization, such calls have some resonance in Iran. "Jomhuri-yi Islami" claimed in a 5 August commentary that an arms shipment seized at the Iranian border was somehow connected with MKO activities, U.S. hostility, and Iraqi claims about Iranian interference.

The MKO, meanwhile, continues its activities against the Iranian government. Approximately 5,000 of its supporters demonstrated in Brussels on 13 September as EU foreign ministers discussed Iran, AFP reported. The so-called International Committee for the Support of Victims of the MKO condemned the Belgian decision to permit this rally, IRNA reported on 12 September. The committee said in a letter to Belgian Foreign Minister Louis Michel that the MKO recruited Afghans and other refugees to participate in the rally by paying for their food and accommodations.

4 posted on 09/28/2004 9:04:12 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Bush administration completes get-tough plan for Syria

SPECIAL TO WORLD TRIBUNE.COM
Tuesday, September 28, 2004

The Bush administration has drafted contingency plans for bringing military and economic pressure against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

Officials said the administration has determined that diplomacy has failed to resolve U.S. concerns that Syria has been working to destabilize the interim government in Iraq.

They said the Assad regime has been harboring senior operatives of Abu Mussib Al Zarqawi, regarded as the most lethal insurgent in Iraq, aides to Saddam Hussein as well as Iraqi nuclear scientists as part of a Syrian policy coordinated with Iran.

On Monday, the State Department reiterated its criticism of Syria for its harboring groups deemed as terrorists, Middle East Newsline reported. The department refused to condemn the Sept. 26 assassination of a Hamas leader in Damascus in a car-bombing attributed to Israel.

"If Americans are dying in Iraq because of Syrian policies, then this is something we are not going to tolerate," a senior official said.

The official, who refused to be identified, did not report any progress in U.S. efforts to end Syria's support of the insurgency movement in Iraq or other issues in dispute between Damascus and Washington.


Sept. 24: U.S. military intelligence: Saddam transferred WMD to Syria

Officials warned that unless Syria changes its policy within the next few weeks, the administration would consider economic and military measures against Damascus that would intensify in 2005. They said the Defense Department has drafted a range of military options meant to put Damascus on the defensive and encourage insurrection within Syria.

Last week, Secretary of State Colin Powell praised Syria's redeployment of more than 3,000 troops in Lebanon and suggested the onset of a new atmosphere in relations.

"I can't go into details on this, but they gave me some information with respect to financial activities [to insurgents in Iraq] and how we can cooperate more fully on that," Powell said in a Sept. 24 meeting with the New York Times editorial board. "We're looking at ways to improve our intelligence exchange."

Two weeks ago, Syria and the United States met in Damascus in what officials termed was a hard-nosed review of bilateral relations that focused on the Assad regime's policy in Iraq.

The U.S. delegation, headed by Assistant Secretary of State William Burns contained members of the Pentagon, White House and National Security Council.

The talks reviewed Syrian WMD programs, support for the insurgency in Iraq and Syria's harboring of billions of dollars sent by the Saddam Hussein regime in 2002 and 2003. "What we said in Damascus is that this has to stop," the senior official said. "Our message to Syria was a warning that this is very serious. Because this means Syria shares responsibility for the killing of Americans and Iraqis, and it has to stop."

At the meeting, Damascus agreed to participate in talks with Iraq and U.S. Central Command to launch cooperation that would halt the flow of insurgents and weapons from Syria, officials said. Officials said the Assad regime was warned that the failure of the military talks, which began on Tuesday in Damascus, could trigger what they termed a major deterioration in U.S. relations with Syria.

"Our job is to convince them that the risk of undermining us is much greater than the opposite," the senior official said.

During the September meeting in Damascus, officials said, the U.S. delegation presented the Assad regime with evidence of Syrian government aid to the insurgency movement in Iraq. The delegation argued that Syria has intensified its support of Al Zarqawi and pro-Saddam forces in an effort to torpedo Iraqi elections scheduled in January 2005.

"It's not just a question of border control," the senior official said. "Institutions within Syria are actively colluding with our enemies in Iraq."

"Terrorists and their supporters beget a cycle of violence that is best addressed through the end of support of terror," State Department deputy spokesman Adam Ereli said. "We have made it clear that in numerous meetings with the Syrians that we think it's in their interests, in the interests of the region, to end support for terrorist organizations and terrorist individuals operating from their territory."

5 posted on 09/28/2004 9:04:31 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Tens of demonstartors killed, injured or arrested

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Sep 28, 2004

Latest reports in reference to the popular demonstrations which took place, on Sunday,  in some Iranian cities and especially the Capital, are stating about several deaths and tens of injured and arrested.

The most violent clashes took place, in Esfahan, Noor-Abad of Mamassani, Shiraz, Hamadan, Saghez, Khoram-Abad and Oroomiah (former Rezai-e) where security agents shoot on demonstrators by killing and injuring several of them.

In most cases, such as, in Noor-Abad of Mamassani (Fars Province) and in Khoram-Abad, angry demonstrators retaliated to the militiamen's brutality and the murder of several demonstrators by attacking the regime's forces with pieces of stones and incendiary devices. The popular reaction resulted in the injuries of several agents and heavy damages made to several patrol cars and public buildings, such as, Noor-Abad's Justice Palace.

Tens of demonstrators, especially young girls and boys, have been reported as missing following the demos of Sunday.

Situation of most provincial cities and Tehran have been reported as very tense and the security forces are remaining deployed in most strategic and popular areas.

6 posted on 09/28/2004 9:04:50 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Clashes as Iran Islamic fund fails


One person was killed and 18 injured in clashes in Iran linked to the collapse of an Islamic loan fund in Nourabad, Iranian state television has reported.

The violence is reported to have taken place after angry customers protested outside state offices in the city.

The Zolfaghar-Ali fund was declared bankrupt, leaving some customers unable to reclaim funds they had deposited.

One report said Nourabad residents had 360bn riyals ($41m; £23m) tied up in the fund.

Vulnerable

A Fars state official told Iranian television that security forces had intervened to quell the protests and calm had been restored.

Damage was caused to some buildings by "a group of agitators and opportunists", said Abdollah Shahasani, head of political affairs in the office of the Fars governor general.

He said the fund's managers had been arrested and a special committee was investigating customer complaints.

Similarly structured Islamic funds allow depositors after several months to take interest-free loans of double the amount deposited.

Fund managers invest the cash deposited but can be vulnerable to a run on the fund if too many depositors try to take loans or withdraw their deposits at once.

Several such funds have collapsed in recent months, causing street protests, AFP news agency said.


7 posted on 09/28/2004 9:05:10 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

No Sign of Nuke Work at Suspect Iran Site-Diplomats

Tue Sep 28, 2004 08:11 AM ET

VIENNA (Reuters) - The analysis of soil samples taken by U.N. inspectors at Lavizan, a site in Tehran that U.S. officials suspect may be linked to an atomic weapons program, shows no sign of nuclear activity, Western diplomats said.

Satellite photos of Lavizan taken between August 2003 and May 2004 showed that Iran had completely razed Lavizan, a site which Iran said was a former military research laboratory, but which it said had nothing to do with atomic-related activities.

"The environmental samples taken at Lavizan have come back negative so far," a Vienna-based diplomat who follows the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) told Reuters. Negative means the samples contained no traces of nuclear materials.

Washington accused Iran of removing a substantial amount of topsoil and rubble from the site and replacing it with a new layer of soil, in what U.S. officials said might have been an attempt to cover clandestine nuclear activity at Lavizan.

Former U.S. ambassador to the IAEA, Kenneth Brill, accused Iran in June of using "the wrecking ball and bulldozer" to sanitize Lavizan prior to the arrival of U.N. inspectors.

But another diplomat close to the IAEA told Reuters that on-site inspections of Lavizan produced no proof that any soil had been removed at all.

The United States accuses Iran of developing nuclear weapons under cover of a civilian atomic energy program, a charge Tehran has repeatedly denied.

The IAEA has been inspecting Iran's nuclear program for two years. Although it has uncovered many previously concealed activities that could be linked to weapons activity, it has found no "smoking gun" to prove Washington's case.


8 posted on 09/28/2004 9:05:29 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

The October Suprise: Terrorist Nuke Program?

John Loftus today saw something missing from Tony Blair’s speech to the Labour Party conference in Brighton: Tony Blair said,

“The evidence about Saddam having actual biological and chemical weapons, as opposed to the capability to develop them, has turned out to be wrong. I acknowledge that and accept it.”

Missing is any mention of Saddam’s nuclear weapons program.

This is consistent with Lord Butler’s report where he praises British Intelligence in their appreciation of Iraq’s nuclear threat. A further explanation of what he meant has not been forthcoming.

From what John is hearing he believes that we may soon the “October Surprise” and it will be a major revelation regarding the nuclear weapons program of terrorist nations.

[John Lotus can be heard M-F on WABC’s John Batchelor show on the 10PM hour EST and on Fox News every Sunday Morning]
9 posted on 09/28/2004 9:05:53 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

US wants ‘regime change’ at IAEA

* Puts El Baradei under pressure

VIENNA: A new board of governors of the UN nuclear watchdog was to meet in Vienna on Monday to set procedures for electing a new director general, with current chief Mohamed El Baradei seeking to remain in office despite US opposition.

El Baradei had earlier this month put his hat into the ring for a third term at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) despite opposition from the United States and possibly other top UN funding states to his continuing in the job.

US officials have said the United States, the largest contributor to the United Nations, supports the position of the Geneva group of top 10 contributors that heads of international organisation should not serve more than two terms.

“This policy has nothing to do with the director general’s qualifications. The United States thinks that he’s done a very good job leading the agency at a very difficult time but it’s simply a matter of principle and good governance,” a Western official familiar with the US position said.

But El Baradei, who is supported by the 13 non-aligned countries on the IAEA’s 35-nation board, may get a boost in October as he is an apparent favourite to win the Nobel Peace Prize, after his work in monitoring nuclear activities in hot spots Iran, Iran, North Korea and Libya.

An IAEA spokesman said the board, which was elected last week at an IAEA general conference, “has to decide today procedures for the appointment of a new director general.”

He said the board would probably close applications for candidacies by December 31 and seek to have the new director general named by a board meeting in June 2005, in order to be formally elected at the next IAEA general conference in September 2005.

El Baradei, 61, who is Egyptian, has been at the Vienna-based IAEA for two decades and has as director general since 1997 become a world figure campaigning for nuclear non-proliferation. afp

10 posted on 09/28/2004 9:06:15 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iranian official refutes Bush's statement on nuclear issue

www.chinaview.cn 2004-09-28 23:56:38

   TEHRAN, Sept. 28 (Xinhuanet) -- Iranian Expediency Council Chairman Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani on Tuesday rejected a recent statement by US President George W. Bush over Iran's nuclear file, the official IRNA news agency reported.

   "Iran is certainly entitled to have access to nuclear technology," said Rafsanjani, referring to Bush's remarks that Iran does not need nuclear energy given its plenty of oil reserves.

   "A lot of countries in the world make use of nuclear energy today," Rafsanjani said, adding "even the United States had plenty of oil when it launched its nuclear activity."
   The United States, accusing Iran of secretly developing atomic weapons for years, has been consistently trying to prompt a referral of Iran's nuclear case to the UN Security Council for possible sanctions on the Islamic republic.

   Tehran denies the US accusation, insisting that its right to get access to peaceful nuclear technology be natural.

   Last month, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) adopted a resolution on Iran's nuclear program, urging the country to suspend all uranium enrichment-related activities and fully cooperate with inspectors to clear up related issues. Enditem
 


11 posted on 09/28/2004 9:06:34 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Waiting to bomb Iran

By Aluf Benn

While the debate in Israel was focused on the disengagement plan, an entirely different discussion was developing in the international media. They have become convinced in recent weeks that Israel is planning an aerial attack on Iran's nuclear installations, should it conclude that Iran is proceeding apace toward the development of an atomic bomb, and the diplomatic effort to stop it has failed.

This discussion is not taking place on remote Internet sites, but in learned analyses by the most important newspapers in the world, which are describing the anticipated Israeli bombing as a political fact that is influencing decision makers in Washington and Europe. Everyone knows that Israel considers the Iranian bomb the most serious threat to its existence and its regional status.

The newspaper articles recall the destruction of the Iraqi nuclear reaction in 1981 as an example of what awaits the Iranians. They analyze the ability of the Israel Air Force to carry out such an operation, and warn that it will lead to terrible repercussions in the Middle East.

There is no question that the bombing of Iran will be much more complicated than the attack on the Iraqi reactor. The flight range is greater, the Iranian installations are scattered and protected, and Iran is capable of retaliating. But the interesting difference between Iraq and Iran is that at the time, the Iraqi operation was planned in secret and was carried out by surprise, and this time the ostensible preparations are being conducted almost in the open.

The belief that Israel's patience is running out have increased since July, when the British Sunday Times reported - based on Israeli sources - on the advanced preparations for bombing the reactor in Bushehr. The article, which was widely quoted all over the world and aroused Iranian counter-threats, seems to be Israeli psychological warfare.

The British papers are a well-known target of such deliberate leaks, but no investigation was begun in Israel about presumed revelations of operational secrets, and at the time, Iran seemed to be evading diplomatic pressure. Afterward came the tests of the Israel Arrow missile and the Iranian Shihab, and more belligerent declarations from Teheran, and additional articles about the anticipated operation.

Judging by an analysis of the articles, Israel has decided to sharpen the sense of urgency in the international community, in order to increase diplomatic pressure on Teheran to cease its enrichment of uranium. This goal has been achieved, at least in the declarations being heard from the United States and Europe, and in the decisions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

It is possible that factors in the West, doubtful about the success of the diplomatic effort, prefer to have Israel act in their place. There are signs of that: Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom, who met with many of his colleagues at the UN General Assembly, heard a great deal of understanding from them about the Iranian danger, and serious doubts as to the chances of diplomacy. Nobody asked Israel to refrain from a belligerent act.

Prime Minister Ariel Sharon says that Israel is not planning a military operation in Iran, and speaks of developing improved means of defense and deterrence. But the foreign media were more interested in the threats against the Iranians by senior members of the Israel Defense Forces. "We will not rely only on others" (Chief of Staff Moshe Ya'alon), "We will rely on others until we have to rely on ourselves" (his deputy, Dan Halutz), "The operational capability of the air force has increased significantly since the bombing of the Iraqi reactor" (Commander of the Israel Air Force, Eliezer Shkedi).

Sharon is disturbed by the growing acceptance, particularly in Europe, of Iran's impending membership in the nuclear club. Meanwhile he is carefully walking on the edge, and is exploiting his tough-guy image to arouse international attention. But nor should we forget that the present political-military leadership - Sharon, Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz, Ya'alon, Halutz - has few inhibitions about exercising military might. Operations that were once considered taboo, such as attacks on Damascus and assassinations of Hamas leaders, now seem self evident.

A possible attack on Iran will be much more complex and risky, and therefore we would do well not to ignore the threats, and to conduct a public debate on the question of whether this course of action is desirable for Israel.


12 posted on 09/28/2004 9:07:01 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran's Shahab-3 surface-to-surface missile is seen displayed in Tehran
Time is GMT + 8 hours
Posted: 29 September 2004 0148 hrs

Iran not seeking nuclear bomb, but will defend itself: minister


NEW YORK : Iran is not trying to build a nuclear bomb, but it has developed long and medium-range missiles to defend itself against potential threats, Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi told CNN television.

Asked if Iran was trying to develop nuclear weapons, Kharrazi replied: "Not at all. We are against (a) nuclear bomb. And it's not part of our defense strategy."
The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has called on Tehran to immediately halt all activities related to uranium enrichment, a process that can make the explosive material for nuclear weapons.

Kharrazi said Iran wants to promote a nuclear-free Middle East and he stressed that UN weapons inspectors had not found any nuclear weapon programs in Iran.

"Iran is quite transparent. All sights are under inspection," he said.

The United States claims Iran is hiding a covert weapons development program, and wants the IAEA to bring Iran before the UN Security Council for possible sanctions.

Kharrazi said Iran should not be referred to the UN Security Council "because there hasn't been a violation," but said Tehran has developed long and medium-range missiles to defend its territory.

Iran's Defence Minister Ali Shamkhani said on Saturday the army had taken delivery of a new "strategic missile" but it is unclear if the weapon is the Shahab-3 medium-range missile, acquired by the Revolutionary Guards in July.

The Shahab-3 is believed to be based on a North Korean design and is thought to be capable of carrying a one-tonne warhead at least 1,300 kilometres (800 miles), well within range of Israel and US bases in the region.

"We have to be able to defend ourself," Kharrazi said.

Asked what Tehran would do if Israel launched an air strike against the country's nuclear facilities, Kharrazi replied: "We would be able to react. How we do react, I cannot tell you that."

The foreign minister said Iran had arrested "several Al-Qaeda" members, but did not detail how many alleged terrorists had been detained or what their names were.

He said they numbered in the "dozens" and that 14 "new elements" had been detained recently.

He said there was no reason to hand them over to Washington as they would be "judged and tried in Iranian courts."

Kharrazi said Tehran would support a regional summit on Iraq and that Iran was not seeking to influence elections scheduled for Iraq in January.

"We are not going to influence any other nation. But what is important for us is to have a democracy, a representative government in Iraq in place."

"We hope that election would be held by the end of January so as to have that representative government in Iraq, which will be able to maintain security for itself," the minister added.

- AFP


13 posted on 09/28/2004 9:07:26 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Reformist journalist arrested in Iran
Web posted at: 9/29/2004 2:45:47
Source ::: AFP

TEHRAN: An Iranian journalist who has worked on the political pages of two reformist dailies in the Islamic republic has been arrested, his wife told the student news agency Isna yesterday.

Rozbeh Mir-Ebrahimi, who has worked for Etemad and Jomhuriat newspapers, "was arrested by people who said they were from the police" on Monday morning, Sulmaz Sharifi said.

The Jomhuriat newspaper was closed down by the judiciary in July.

"They searched the house and asked him questions about his work with different Internet sites. They said he would be released soon but so far I have not heard from him and they have given me no reason for his arrest," she told Isna.

Iran's hardline judiciary has maintained a crackdown on the pro-reform press for several years, with scores of papers shut down and journalists frequently detained. Around 15 journalists are currently believed to be behind bars.

On September 7, Etemad journalist Shahram Rafizadeh was also arrested and is still being held. The judiciary also recently arrested three writers who publish over the Internet — signalling the crackdown was being extended to cyberspace.

A prominent reformist politician and former MP, Mohsen Armin, told ISNA that since the Internet crackdown began a month ago, "around 20 people have been arrested" for accessing banned sites.

14 posted on 09/29/2004 1:24:50 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Major firms vie for Iranian oil field development contracts

 

By OGJ editors

HOUSTON, Sept. 28 -- Five international oil consortia, including Royal Dutch/Shell Group, Total SA, Statoil ASA, Norsk Hydro AS, and Repsol YPF SA, have submitted bids for developing Iran's Yadavaran oil field, OPEC News Agency reported.

Seyed Mehdi Hosseini, managing director of National Iranian Oil Co., said NIOC also is negotiating LNG purchase-marketing deals with three groups from India, China, and Spain in exchange for 20% shares in the Yadavaran development project, said Hosseini.

The companies, which would not be involved in operations, would obtain the share in investment, costs, and interests of the contracts, in exchange for purchasing 5 million tonnes/year of LNG, OPECNA reported.


15 posted on 09/29/2004 1:27:07 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

US to keep pushing for Security Council debate on Iran


AFP - World News (via Yahoo)
Sep 28, 2004

WASHINGTON - The United States will keep pushing the UN Security Council to consider whether Iran's nuclear ambitions are out of bounds, John Bolton, US undersecretary of state for arms control and international security, said.

Photo
AFP/File Photo

 

"The reason we favor taking it to the Security Council is, we want to put Iran in the international spotlight, in the agency and the UN system responsible for such matters, to change the global political dynamic, to increase the pressure on Iran to give up pursuit of nuclear weapons," Bolton said at a conference at the American Enterprise Institute.

"It raises the stakes for Iran. In the Security Council their options narrow."

The International Atomic Energy Agency has called on Tehran to immediately halt all activities related to uranium enrichment, a process that can make the explosive material for nuclear weapons.

The United States claims Iran is hiding a covert weapons development program and wants the agency to bring Iran before the UN Security Council in November.

Iran denies it is seeking nuclear weapons and insists it has a right to pursue a peaceful nuclear program.

For his part, Bolton denied that Washington was automatically seeking council action against Tehran.

"It is simply not the case that referral to the Security Council results in any kind of automatic Security Council action," he said.

16 posted on 09/29/2004 1:29:22 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

John Kerry facing his moment of truth


By Alex Massie
Sep 29, 2004

IN THE run-up to tomorrow’s first presidential debate between George W Bush and Senator John Kerry, I came across an interesting speech the other day. It showed a previously unsuspected ability on the part of the orator in question to appreciate the importance of taking a robust approach to regimes in rogue and failed states that, in an age of global interdependence, threaten countries far from their own borders.

"We must recognise that there is no indication that Saddam Hussein has any intention of relenting," the speaker warned his audience. "So we have an obligation of enormous consequence, an obligation to guarantee that Saddam Hussein cannot ignore the United Nations.

"He cannot be permitted to go unobserved and unimpeded toward his horrific objective of amassing a stockpile of weapons of mass destruction.

"This is not a matter about which there should be any debate whatsoever in the Security Council, or, certainly, in this nation.

"I believe that the United Nations must take, and should authorise immediately, whatever steps are necessary to force him to relent - and that the United States should support and participate in those steps."

The speaker continued: "While we should always see to take significant international actions on a multilateral rather than unilateral basis whenever that is possible, if in the final analysis we face what we truly believe to be a grave threat to the well-being of our nation or the entire world and it cannot be removed peacefully we must have the courage to do what we believe is right and wise."

He went on: "I submit that the old adage ‘pay now or pay later’ applies perfectly in this situation."

The speaker noted that only small quantities of biological weapons would be needed to murder thousands of civilians in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem. "These could be delivered by ballistic missile", he warned, "but they also could be delivered by much more pedestrian means; aerosol applicators on commercial trucks easily could suffice."

The man who spoke these words was not Tony Blair. Nor, as the number of subordinate clauses will have warned you, was it George W Bush. Nor was it Paul Wolfowitz or even Joe Lieberman.

It was actually John Kerry, speaking on the floor of the United States Senate on 9 November, 1997, after Saddam had expelled the UN weapons inspectors from Iraq.

It’s true that Kerry, having opposed military action against Saddam after he invaded Kuwait, seems happy with the idea of using force only when the idea of using meaningful force is not an immediate likelihood, but the speech is worth quoting at length to demonstrate where Kerry once was, and the contrast with where he is today.

Do not be too surprised if George Bush reminds Senator Kerry of these words when they meet at the University of Miami tomorrow for the first of their three presidential debates. This debate, which will focus entirely on foreign policy, may prove to be the decisive moment in this election campaign.

Yesterday’s Washington Post/ABC News poll showed the extent to which Kerry remains on the back foot. Nationwide, Bush leads by 51 per cent to 45 per cent and, critically, the president continues to enjoy a 53-40 per cent lead on handling the situation in Iraq and a 54-37 per cent advantage when voters are asked which candidate they trust to lead the campaign against terrorism - even though 51 per cent of those surveyed no longer believe the war was worth fighting.

In other words, the electorate is not happy with Bush but it is even less content with Kerry.

Even among Democrats, the poll found that just 39 per cent were "enthusiastic" about their candidate. In these circumstances, a draw tomorrow night will be of little use to the challenger.

Kerry, and his supporters, would like to have us believe that we should get beyond asking whether he thought the war was justified or not and instead focus on what is happening in Iraq right now. Up to a point. It’s true that President Bush seems intent on viewing events in Mesopotamia through Panglossian spectacles, but that is less important, for now, than the fact that the answer to the question: "Would you have gone to war?" is the most pressing matter of the day and tells us what we need, indeed deserve, to know about what a Kerry presidency would look like.

Kerry’s answer, depending on when and where the question is asked, is insufficiently clear. Sometimes he’ll say yes, sometimes he’ll say no.

This is not nuance, it is disingenuousness. The true sense of his position has, however, leaked out. For all that he protests, from time to time, that he is less against the idea of toppling Saddam than he is against the manner in which it was done, the unhappy truth remains that were John Kerry president, Saddam would remain untoppled.

AFTER all, Kerry’s new campaign strategist, Joe Lockhart, last week dismissed Ayad Allawi as nothing more than an American "puppet", denying him the legitimacy he rather needs to help foster some kind of stability in Iraq.

This is the key question of the campaign and, I suspect, the ground upon which Bush will choose to fight tomorrow night. It is a matter of world view and strategy rather than day-to-day tactics which can, and sometimes should, shift with the wind.

As Christopher Hitchens bluntly put it this week: "This is not a year, or a time, to be dicking around." This too will be the president’s message. If Kerry was wrong on Saddam, Bush will maintain, he cannot be trusted to be right on Iran or North Korea (two cases in which this "unilateral" administration has pursued a strategy that has been more multilateral than it has been effective.)

Kerry will make the case that post-war blundering in Iraq has brought the United States into disrepute and made the world a more dangerous place. In the short-term that may well be true, but, Bush will suggest, true leadership demands a longer view.

Thus far, Kerry has failed to demonstrate that he has that kind of penetrating gaze. He has run a campaign predicated almost entirely upon the proposition that he is not George W Bush and upon the non sequitur that having served in Vietnam, he is qualified to make tough decisions on matters of war and peace. This is not enough. Few voters know what Kerry stands for, only what he stands against.

Democrats hope that their remarkably successful voter-registration drives will overcome the pollsters’ findings - Cleveland and Philadelphia, for instance, are reporting record numbers of new Democratic registrations - but unless Kerry can win the security and "vision thing" argument, then his goose may be cooked.

Nonetheless, expect Kerry to continue to argue, as he has in recent days, that "George Bush has failed to be forthcoming with the American people about what is happening in Iraq and has failed to provide the leadership we need. I will do a better job of dealing with Iraq and winning the war and fighting the war on terror, period."

Kerry’s problem, however, is that while the voters agree with that first sentence, they show few signs of believing the second.

Unless he can change that perception tomorrow night, George W Bush will be odds-on to win a second term.

17 posted on 09/29/2004 1:36:48 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Waiting to bomb Iran

By Aluf Benn

While the debate in Israel was focused on the disengagement plan, an entirely different discussion was developing in the international media. They have become convinced in recent weeks that Israel is planning an aerial attack on Iran's nuclear installations, should it conclude that Iran is proceeding apace toward the development of an atomic bomb, and the diplomatic effort to stop it has failed.

This discussion is not taking place on remote Internet sites, but in learned analyses by the most important newspapers in the world, which are describing the anticipated Israeli bombing as a political fact that is influencing decision makers in Washington and Europe. Everyone knows that Israel considers the Iranian bomb the most serious threat to its existence and its regional status.

The newspaper articles recall the destruction of the Iraqi nuclear reaction in 1981 as an example of what awaits the Iranians. They analyze the ability of the Israel Air Force to carry out such an operation, and warn that it will lead to terrible repercussions in the Middle East.

There is no question that the bombing of Iran will be much more complicated than the attack on the Iraqi reactor. The flight range is greater, the Iranian installations are scattered and protected, and Iran is capable of retaliating. But the interesting difference between Iraq and Iran is that at the time, the Iraqi operation was planned in secret and was carried out by surprise, and this time the ostensible preparations are being conducted almost in the open.

The belief that Israel's patience is running out have increased since July, when the British Sunday Times reported - based on Israeli sources - on the advanced preparations for bombing the reactor in Bushehr. The article, which was widely quoted all over the world and aroused Iranian counter-threats, seems to be Israeli psychological warfare.

The British papers are a well-known target of such deliberate leaks, but no investigation was begun in Israel about presumed revelations of operational secrets, and at the time, Iran seemed to be evading diplomatic pressure. Afterward came the tests of the Israel Arrow missile and the Iranian Shihab, and more belligerent declarations from Teheran, and additional articles about the anticipated operation.

Judging by an analysis of the articles, Israel has decided to sharpen the sense of urgency in the international community, in order to increase diplomatic pressure on Teheran to cease its enrichment of uranium. This goal has been achieved, at least in the declarations being heard from the United States and Europe, and in the decisions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

It is possible that factors in the West, doubtful about the success of the diplomatic effort, prefer to have Israel act in their place. There are signs of that: Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom, who met with many of his colleagues at the UN General Assembly, heard a great deal of understanding from them about the Iranian danger, and serious doubts as to the chances of diplomacy. Nobody asked Israel to refrain from a belligerent act.

Prime Minister Ariel Sharon says that Israel is not planning a military operation in Iran, and speaks of developing improved means of defense and deterrence. But the foreign media were more interested in the threats against the Iranians by senior members of the Israel Defense Forces. "We will not rely only on others" (Chief of Staff Moshe Ya'alon), "We will rely on others until we have to rely on ourselves" (his deputy, Dan Halutz), "The operational capability of the air force has increased significantly since the bombing of the Iraqi reactor" (Commander of the Israel Air Force, Eliezer Shkedi).

Sharon is disturbed by the growing acceptance, particularly in Europe, of Iran's impending membership in the nuclear club. Meanwhile he is carefully walking on the edge, and is exploiting his tough-guy image to arouse international attention. But nor should we forget that the present political-military leadership - Sharon, Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz, Ya'alon, Halutz - has few inhibitions about exercising military might. Operations that were once considered taboo, such as attacks on Damascus and assassinations of Hamas leaders, now seem self evident.

A possible attack on Iran will be much more complex and risky, and therefore we would do well not to ignore the threats, and to conduct a public debate on the question of whether this course of action is desirable for Israel.

18 posted on 09/29/2004 1:42:30 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Why are there not mass demonstrations in Iran? I really felt that there would have been more obvious signs of change months ago. What is happening there?


19 posted on 09/29/2004 1:46:19 AM PDT by BunnySlippers ("F" Stands for FLIP-FLOP ...)
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To: BunnySlippers

The regime has successfully stopped all demonstrations, except that over the past weekend. They have brought in thousands of foreign security forces (Arab)to put down any such efforts.

In is not uncommon for the regime to station security forces at nearly all intersections. They do not allow groups to gather.

The regime has been brutal in its efforts. Many are arrested, imprisoned, or missing.


20 posted on 09/29/2004 1:51:05 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Any ideas on why there is absolutely no reporting on this event in the Western press? I don't doubt you. I'm just wishing we can encourage these demostrations.


21 posted on 09/29/2004 2:00:15 AM PDT by BunnySlippers ("F" Stands for FLIP-FLOP ...)
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To: BunnySlippers
Perhaps this will help you understand.

"First, the media works in a pack that is happiest when following a simple narrative."

This is an observation by Mike Murphy of the Weekly Standard speaking in reference to the coming presidential debates, but the it applies to news coverage in general.

Thus far the news on Iran requires a considerable amount of understanding of people, culture, strategies, events, in order to interpret what is happening there.

The news media is looking for "a simple narrative." They are looking for something that people can immediately understand and appreciate, such as the return of a major leader, an election, things of this nature. They are looking for news that is easy to consume.

The news on Iran does not fit this at this time.

Another thing missing for the broadcast media is that there is little video footage of events inside of Iran to "tell the story." This is of course due to the restrictions placed on the media by the regime. Major news networks with journalists in Iran fear exposing the regime prematurely for fear of being forced out of the country.

So what does this mean for those of us wanting to support the Iranian people?

I would suggest that before we contact the media on a breaking news story, that we need to provide the media with this "simple narrative" that the media can use.

Once events warrant it and we provide that narrative, if the media takes hold of the story, group think takes over among journalists and they will attack the story.
22 posted on 09/29/2004 8:37:09 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iranian Citizens Trash Fahrenheit 9/11

By Banafsheh Zand-Bonazzi
September 29, 2004

A few weeks ago, Mamoun Fandy, a media analyst, syndicated columnist and former professor of Arab Studies at Georgetown University, was interviewed on the subject of Michael Moore. Fandy stated that Iraqis who were familiar with the film found Moore’s portrayal of them to be exceedingly racist; he went on to say that Moore’s callousness to the plight of the Iraqi people and to the unbelievable human rights devastation in Iraq was outrageous.

And that was only the verdict of the Iraqis.

I have also been asked to express the judgment of a number of Iranians who saw the film in Iran. They sent e-mails, faxes and even phoned me to ask me to report their reviews.

First, other than David Lynch’s film, ‘The Straight Story’, Iranians have not really been exposed to any western films in their cinemas. The Mullahs’ film board forbids the display of women’s uncovered hair and all the other “corruption” Western filmmakers spread. For Iranians, therefore, viewing Michael Moore’s film was a tremendously novel experience.

After 25 years of living in a virtual concentration camp, Iranians have become exceedingly socio-politically savvy. Moore’s anti-American propaganda did not attract anywhere near as many viewers as the Mullahs had hoped for. Tehran’s despots had hoped the film would challenge the Iranian people’s favourable notion of President Bush and promote John Kerry.

But Iranians are too smart.

A group of 12 university students, for example, composed of both men and women who had seen the film, collectively wrote me and signed an e-mail which said: “Wow, this guy complains that Bush lied once. What would this windbag do if he lived here where our president lies to us once an hour?”

Another comment was: “This guy gets to publicly accuse Bush of lying and becomes famous and adored worldwide. We, here, complain about some decrepit and inconsequential government lackey and we not only go to prison but some of us get death sentences. He ought to thank his lucky stars he lives in a country where he’s allowed and even encouraged to be this obnoxious…”

Someone else quipped: “If he thinks that the U.S. is so bad, he’s welcome to trade places with us…since he’s so forgiving of brutal Middle Eastern dictators!”

Another young man said: “They are showing this film to erase from our minds the idea of America being the great liberator; maybe Americans themselves don’t appreciate what they have but we sure do!”

Another comment was: “Outside such pathetic ideological schemes, Moore’s fixation to reprimand and castigate his own society is so great that he is BLIND to the fact that our ancient land and society cannot be regarded and dealt with in the same fashion; therefore he has fallen pray to the Mullahs for whom he is nothing more than a tool to discard when his mission for them is completed.”

My father, Siamak Pourzand, a 75-year-old Iranian journalist, film historian/critic/promoter has been a political prisoner since November of 2001 in the Islamic Republic of Iran, where he has experienced severe torture. During this time, not one member of the self-involved, international film community, to whom I reached out about his plight, responded. When in the fall of 2002 I called Michael Moore’s office, (like I did many other Hollywoodites) I was told: “Sorry, but Mr. Moore is too busy AND just can’t get involved in these types of matters because we can’t be sure who you are and what your agenda is.”

I am sure Moore is a busy guy, but with all the blowhard exposing of “evil” that he proclaims to be doing, I’m sure he could have asked someone on his team to find out who I was and what my so-called “agenda” was. But unfortunately, he cannot even be bothered to contact the brilliant Ray Bradbury to get permission to use Mr. Bradbury´s copyrighted title, let alone contact some random Middle Eastern wretch like me, who’ll challenge his myopia and force him to cast a critical eye outside the little box that he so cozily lives in.

Most intelligent and politically savvy people from my part of the Middle East and the vicinity, with whom I network, believe that Moore is not qualified to address our issues; he is simply not familiar with our cultures, history, mentalities or peoples’ needs; NOR does he have to right to impose his diatribe on our exhausted and abused peoples.

Mr. Moore and his mindless and greedy distributors thought that they could manipulate the Iranian people; but this goes to prove a crucial point: Moore thinks he speaks for his audiences but he does not know them. Otherwise, he would not have agreed to screen his film in a country whose citizens’ collective, real-life experiences drowns the clamor of Moore’s vapid bitching.
23 posted on 09/29/2004 8:43:39 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...

Iranian Citizens Trash Fahrenheit 9/11

Frontpage.com
By Banafsheh Zand-Bonazzi
September 29, 2004

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1229968/posts?page=23#23


24 posted on 09/29/2004 8:45:26 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Blair says Iran and N.Korea close to compliance

Wed 29 September, 2004 09:09



LONDON (Reuters) - Prime Minister Tony Blair says the international community is closer than ever to making North Korea and Iran accept its demands to halt nuclear programmes.

"A couple of weeks ago Libya finally wound up its WMD (Weapons of Mass Destruction) programme. America has lifted sanctions. We have a better chance of getting Iran and North Korea into compliance than we have ever had," Blair told BBC radio on Wednesday.

Defending the decision to go to war in Iraq, Blair added: "I thought and I still think it was absolutely essential we took that step. I don't accept that containment was working."

Both Iran and North Korea, along with pre-war Iraq, were labelled by President George W. Bush as part of an "axis of evil" and have been under pressure from the West over their nuclear programmes.

North Korea cancelled a scheduled September round of talks over scrapping its nuclear programme in exchange for security guarantees, while the International Atomic Energy Agency has said it will take tough action if Iran defies its call to stop uranium enrichment.

25 posted on 09/29/2004 8:59:35 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Israel issue warning over Iran nuclear weapons
29/09/2004 - 09:10:15

Israel will consider “all options” to prevent Iran from producing nuclear weapons, Defence Minister Shaul Mofaz said in an interview published today.

Concern about Iranian nuclear development intensified last week when Iranian Vice President Reza Aghazadeh said the country had started converting raw uranium into the gas needed for enrichment, an important step in making a nuclear bomb.

The declaration came in defiance of a resolution passed by the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN nuclear watchdog, demanding Iran freeze all uranium enrichment – including conversion.

Israel considers Iran its most dangerous enemy and worries that Iran’s nuclear weapons programme is intended as a threat against it. Iran denies it is developing nuclear weapons, saying its nuclear development programme is aimed at generating electricity.

Mofaz told the Israeli daily Yediot Ahronot that Israel had to be prepared to deal with what he called the Iranian “threat”.

“All options have to be taken into account to prevent it,” he was quoted as saying.

Mofaz said there was a chance a moderate regime would emerge in Tehran to stop the development of nuclear weapons, but if not, measures had to be taken to prevent their deployment.

“The question is what comes first, nuclear ability or regime change?” Yediot quoted him as saying.

Earlier this month, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon said Israel is “taking measures to defend itself” – a comment that raised concerns that Israel is considering a pre-emptive strike against Iranian nuclear installations along the lines of its 1981 bombing of an unfinished Iraqi nuclear reactor at Osirak near Baghdad.

26 posted on 09/29/2004 9:01:20 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Movement in KRSI Radio Q&A program on Thursday/Friday


SMCCDI (Public Announcement)
Sep 29, 2004

The Movement's Coordinator, Aryo B. Pirouznia, will participate in the "Views" program of the popular and Los Angeles based Persian speaking "Radio Voice of Iran"(KRSI), on Friday October 1, 2004.

This live Q&A program, hosted by the well respected KRSI's Ms. Pari Saffari, will start from 02:30 AM of Friday in Iran's local time (06:00 PM US EST = 23:00 GMT of Thursday Sep. 30th). It will be broadcasted via satellite worldwide and will be relayed in main N. American and some European cities by KRSI's affiliated local radio stations.

It will be also audible via KRSI's Internet website located at:
http://www.krsi.net/us-en/livewebcast.asp

The discussion will be mainly focused on Iran's current situation and the problems and successes witnessed by the secular opposition.

The recorded program will become available, after the discussion, on the KRSI's archives located at:
http://www.krsi.net/archive/archive.asp?archive=10

27 posted on 09/29/2004 9:06:56 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Russia reluctant to refer Iran to UNSC

Reuters
Moscow, September 29

Russia is against reporting Iran to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for what the United States and some other countries say are breaches of UN nuclear rules, a top Kremlin official was quoted as saying on Wednesday.

"Taking this issue to the UN Security Council, which is a political body, will hardly do us any favours," Igor Ivanov, head of Russia's Security Council and a former foreign minister who widened nuclear ties with Iran, told Interfax news agency.

However, diplomats at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said the comment did not mean that Russia would definitely block a referral of the IAEA's concerns to the UNSC, which could sanction Iran.

Russia's criticism of Iran has strengthened since Tehran threatened this month to defy a call by the IAEA, the UN nuclear watchdog, for it to stop work on enriching uranium, a process that can be used to develop nuclear arms.

Moscow for months opposed referring the agency's concerns to the Security Council, where Russia holds a veto. But last week, President Vladimir Putin, who is being pressed by the United States to stop building a nuclear power station at Bushehr in Iran, urged Tehran to heed the IAEA's demands.

Many diplomats now believe that if Iran presses ahead with enrichment work, Moscow would support US demands to refer Iran to the Council in November for possible economic sanctions.

"Russia will not prevent the US from sending Iran to the Security Council," one non-American Western diplomat on the IAEA board told Reuters at the agency's headquarters in Vienna.

Washington says Iran wants nuclear arms and may use Russian know-how to acquire them, a charge Iran and Moscow deny.

Although Russia has promised to abandon Bushehr if Iran breaches any IAEA rules, the plant's launch has been delayed for years in what diplomats in Moscow see as a sign Putin may share privately some of the US concerns over Iran's intentions.
28 posted on 09/29/2004 9:11:05 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

AN IRAN-ISRAELI WAR? [Excerpt]

By PETER BROOKES

September 29, 2004 -- TIME after time, the 35-nation International Atomic Energy Agency has demanded that Iran stop enriching uranium. Yet Tehran keeps on thumbing its nose at the U.N. body, saying its uranium enrichment is just a peaceful effort to produce electricity.

To many nations, especially Israel, it seems only a matter of time before Iran breaks out as a nuclear power, ratcheting up tension across the door Middle East. An Israel-Iran showdown over Tehran's outlaw nuclear-weapons program now seems increasingly imminent.

Last week, for example, Israel charged that Iran was merely "buying time" and will never abandon plans to develop nuclear weapons. It called for the U.N. Security Council "to put an end to this nightmare."

Addressing reporters at the U.N., Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom kept all options on the table by avoiding answering whether Israel would take military action against Iran if it continued to pursue nuclear weapons.

Also last week, the administration informed Congress that it was selling Israel 5,000 precision-guided "smart bombs," including 500 satellite-guided, one-ton JDAM "bunker busters" of Baghdad fame. (JDAMs are capable of penetrating six feet of concrete.)

In response to the arms sale, Tehran warned Tel Aviv against attacking its nuclear facilities, saying it would react "most severely" to any Israeli military action against Iran.

Then, over the weekend, Iran pointedly announced that its Shahab-3 ballistic missile was now operational. The missile can reach Israel, and Iran has 25 to 100 of them. Defense Minister Ali Shamkhrani crowed that Iran was now "ready to confront all regional [read: Israeli] and extra-regional [read: American] threats."

OK, so you say, a little chest-beating isn't the same as the beating of war drums. True. But bear in mind, Israel takes the threat of nuclear weapons in its neighborhood quite seriously. Just ask Saddam Hussein.

In 1981, Israeli fighters conducted a low-level, 700-mile, daylight raid through Saudi Arabian and Jordanian air space into Iraq. In a minute and a half, the fighters laid waste to the French-supplied Osiraq nuclear reactor — the centerpiece of Iraq's burgeoning nuclear-weapons program.

So what would happen if Israel decided to conduct a pre-emptive surgical strike on Iran's nuclear facilities?

Some say that an Israeli attack on a Muslim country would set the Middle East ablaze in an anti-Jewish frenzy. Possible, but not likely.

Sure, all Muslim governments would vociferously condemn the Israeli strike. But most would breathe a quiet sigh of relief. No one in the Middle East (except maybe Syria) wants to see fundamentalist, hegemonic Iran go nuclear. This is especially true for Iran's cross-Gulf rival, Saudi Arabia.

No Arab country would strike back at Israel, but Iran's Lebanese terrorist proxy, Hezbollah, would almost certainly target Israeli (and perhaps U.S.) interests in the region.

Iran itself could decide to retaliate on Israeli cities with missile strikes. And while Israel has a limited missile defense system, missiles raining in on Tel Aviv, a city of 3 million, could be devastating. But Israel could threaten to respond to Iranian strikes on Israeli civilian targets with nuclear weapons.

The other problem is exactly how to inflict sufficient damage on the Iranian nuclear program. Iran has as at least 24 suspected nuclear facilities scattered around the country. Some are underground; others are (intentionally) located by major population areas to ensure civilian casualties during a raid.

But the cost of doing nothing may be the most expensive. An Iranian nuclear breakout would mean a radical shift in the balance of power in the Middle East. Saudi Arabia would certainly move to go nuclear (with likely help from Pakistan). ...

Clearly, there are no easy choices, only hard decisions. A peaceful end to the Iranian nuclear problem should continue to be sought, but the countdown to a nuclear Iran has already begun.

Israel — at least for the moment — seems to be committed to a peaceful solution. But don't be surprised if Tel Aviv decides to jump the diplomatic track in an effort to end — or at least forestall — Iran's bid to become the first anti-Israeli member of the exclusive nuclear club.

Peter Brookes is a Heritage Foundation senior fellow. E-mail: peterbrookes@heritage.org
29 posted on 09/29/2004 9:14:47 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

THE REAL STRUGGLE FOR IRAQ

[Excerpt]

By AMIR TAHERI

September 29, 2004 -- WHILE kidnappings and head-choppings in the Sunni Triangle domi nate the news from Iraq, the real battle for that nation's future is fought in diplomatic, political and media arenas outside that country.

The terrorist movement in Iraq, at times graced with the label of "insurgency," is in no position to impose its will on the nation. With the help of its outside backers, it could, to be sure, continue kidnappings and killings for years.

More than a dozen countries (Colombia, Peru, Malaysia, the Philippines, Algeria, Egypt, etc.) have experienced similar terrorist movements in recent decades. In every case, the terrorists, having pushed the limits of brutality as far as they could, were ultimately defeated.

It took Peru almost a quarter-century to defeat and destroy the vicious Shining Path. ... It took the British almost 12 years to defeat the so-called "insurgency" in Malaya which, despite massive support from China and the U.S.S.R., was doomed from the start.

The ultimate reason for terrorist movements' failure is the same that constitutes their raison d'etre: Individuals and groups choose terrorism because they know they cannot mobilize popular support.

The terrorist hopes to force history in his direction with the help of bombs and guns. He tries to substitute his will for the will of the people. While claiming to fight in the name of the people he is, in fact, excluding the people from the political process if only because "ordinary citizens" are not prepared to die, let alone kill, for abstract ideas.

So the "insurgency" in Iraq is going nowhere fast. It will be as roundly defeated as were its predecessors in so many other countries. The danger for Iraq's future lies elsewhere.

It comes, in part, from Americans who want Iraq to fail because they want President Bush to fail. Some 81 books paint the president as the devil incarnate; Bush-bashing is also the theme of three "documentaries" plus half a dozen Hollywood feature films. Never before in any mature democracy has a political leader aroused so much hatred from his domestic opponents.

Others want Iraq to fail because they want America to fail, with or without Bush. The bitter tone of U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan when he declared the liberation of Iraq "illegal" shows that it is not the future of Iraq but the vilification of the United States that interests him.

Add to this the recent bizarre phrase from French Prime Minister Jean-Pierre Raffarin. The head of the Figaro press group went to see him about the kidnapping of two French journalists in Iraq; Raffarin assured him they would soon be freed, reportedly saying, "The Iraqi insurgents are our best allies."

In plain language, this means that, in the struggle in Iraq, Raffarin does not see France on the side of its NATO allies — the U.S., Britain, Italy and Denmark among others — but on the side of the "insurgents."

Those who want Iraq to fail because they hate Bush and/or America as a whole (for reasons that have nothing to do with Iraq) know that "the insurgents" can't get anywhere. Nor would the Bush- or America-bashers really want Abu Mussab al-Zarqawi to become ruler of Iraq.

If Jimmy Carter had been U.S. president or if Iraq had been liberated by the European Union, we would have none of the hot air that is blown about the war throughout the world. But someone like Carter or an entity like the European Union could never say boo to a goose, let alone destroy a vicious tyranny.

Those who want Iraq to fail so that Bush and/or America will also fail are now focusing their energies towards a single goal: postponing elections in Iraq for as long as possible. To achieve that goal, they will stop at nothing.

It was on that basis that opponents of Iraqi elections have cooked up a story around the claim that Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the primus inter pares of the Shiite clerics in Najaf, wants the election postponed or may even boycott.

U.S. and European newspapers that had always dismissed Sistani as "a reactionary mullah" have recently put him in the headlines and devoted lengthy editorials and op-ed pieces to his supposed opposition to the holding of elections.

The initial story was built around the claim that Sistani is unhappy with the elections because the Shiite share is limited to 55 percent of the total rather than 60 percent.

This is an absurd claim for the simple reason that the planned elections treat all of Iraq as a single constituency in which every vote is equal to every other vote. And if several or even all of Iraq's political parties wish to enter the election with a single list of national unity, how could Sistani overrule them? The ayatollah has never claimed to be a dictator.

Nor is Iraq an Iranian-style "Islamic" state, where a single mullah can overrule everyone else and even suspend the basic tenets of the religion. Anyone who knows Sistani would know that he is the last person to play the deadly game of Shiite-Sunni rivalry.

Note also that the January election is to form a Constituent Assembly, a body that will write the nation's new constitution. It is therefore important that the assembly enjoy the widest possible support among all Iraqis.

Immediately after Saddam's fall, some of us had urged the Bush administration to transfer power to an interim Iraqi government and organize elections as quickly as possible. Sistani endorsed that view as early as August 2003, calling for a transfer of power to the Iraqis and the holding of elections.

His position has not changed. Sistani wants elections, and wants them as soon as possible. All he asks is that the international community, including the United Nations, play a role in organizing and supervising the series of elections planned for next year. His hope is that Iraq would not only have a new constitution, to be approved in a popular referendum, but also an elected parliament and a government with a clear electoral mandate before the end of 2006. That, he knows, is the fastest way for the Coalition forces to leave Iraq in peace and with dignity.

Sistani insists on international participation, beyond the U.S.-led Coalition, for two reasons. First, he knows that divisions among the big powers over Iraq are harmful for all concerned. He wants them to unite in helping the people of Iraq make their true feelings known through free elections. Second, he knows that the elections will enjoy greater legitimacy if the international community unanimously endorses the results.

Sistani's message is simple: Think of the future of Iraq, not the settling of past scores. E-mail:

amirtaheri@ benadorassociates.com
30 posted on 09/29/2004 9:20:07 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

New deadly clashes rock western Iran

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Sep 29, 2004

New deadly clashes rocked, yesterday, Mian-do-Ab located in western Iran by resulting in several deaths and injuries among armed opponents and members of the regime forces.

The Islamic regime officials are intending to portray the armed opponents as members of a religious cult and renegades but are acknowledging the existence of various ammunition depots.

The official number of deaths have been announced as five but other reports are stating about a much higher number as many in the region have rallied the armed opposition and nightly attacks are carried against the regime forces and interests.

Already last Wednesday two militiamen, including a regional commander, were killed in a deadly clash which occurred in the region.

The residents of the "Se-Tapeh" village retaliated to the brutal assault of the regime's forces sent to the locality.

Armed struggle is in constant raise as a majority of Iranians are believing that the Islamic regime will not step down from political power by peaceful means.

31 posted on 09/29/2004 9:27:37 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Russia: Iran Under IAEA's Mandate

UN -- Security Council
Russia says no to UN Security Council involvement
29 September 2004 -- Moscow opposes referring Iran's nuclear program to the UN Security Council, saying the issue should be handled by the UN's nuclear agency.

Igor Ivanov, the head of Russia's Security Council, made his remarks today in Moscow. He said the issue falls under the mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

Ivanov also reiterated that Russia will continue helping Iran with its nuclear program.

"We have emphasized many times that Russia continues to develop nuclear cooperation with Iran, particularly through the Bushehr nuclear power plant construction project," Ivanov said. "That project will be completed under the condition that all spent nuclear fuel is returned to Russia."

The IAEA has called on Tehran to halt its uranium-enrichment program, a process that produces fuel for nuclear reactors but can also make explosive material for nuclear weapons.

The United States says Iran is covertly developing nuclear arms, which Tehran denies.

Russia, which is helping Iran build its first nuclear power plant at Bushehr, says it will continue its nuclear cooperation with Iran as long as it complies with the IAEA.

32 posted on 09/29/2004 9:29:44 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Thanks for the explanation.


33 posted on 09/29/2004 5:07:29 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: DoctorZIn

"Someone else quipped: “If he thinks that the U.S. is so bad, he’s welcome to trade places with us…since he’s so forgiving of brutal Middle Eastern dictators!”"

This is a good idea. Lets trade the anti-America americans for the Pro-America Iranians. It will make this country a lot safer and more secure, plus it will make decision making on what to do with Iran a lot easier.


34 posted on 09/29/2004 5:51:37 PM PDT by mjaneangels@aolcom
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To: DoctorZIn

Bump!


35 posted on 09/29/2004 6:04:35 PM PDT by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

36 posted on 09/29/2004 9:01:30 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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