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To: JohnHuang2
Crohn's was unknown until the early 1900s when two very similar diseases were described: one in domestic animals called Johne's disease and one in humans named after the physician who first wrote about it, Dr. Burrill Crohn.

And, of course, in the days before pasteurization when people drank milk pretty much directly from cows, everything was hunky dory.

But what makes it unimaginably worse is compelling research, mostly from Europe, which reveals this horrible disease is not autoimmune at all.

Compelling evidence links Crohn's disease with Mycobacteria paratuberculosis.


And almost all people who get cancer have eaten butter. There's a lot more going on than just the presence or absence of bacteria and a lot of the disease lies in the susceptibility of the individual rather than in the extrinsic agent. Everybody is exposed to pathogens on a constant, daily basis. Only a relative few will be killed by this exposure.

Here's some of that "compelling" research from Europe:
Click here to read 
Bacterial DNA within granulomas of patients with Crohn's disease--detection by laser capture microdissection and PCR.

Ryan P, Kelly RG, Lee G, Collins JK, O'Sullivan GC, O'Connell J, Shanahan F.

Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre; and Departments of Medicine, Histopathology, Microbiology, and Surgery, University College Cork, National University of Ireland, Ireland.

OBJECTIVES: We previously reported the use of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and PCR to detect the presence of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis DNA in granulomas of patients with Crohn's disease. While this does not imply a cause-effect relationship, it may influence the disease process because bacterial DNA has immunomodulatory effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether DNA from nonmycobacterial commensals, such as Escherichia coli, is also increased in the granulomas of Crohn's disease. METHODS: Archival tissue from 15 surgical cases of Crohn's disease and 10 non-Crohn's granulomatous bowel disease controls were examined. Granulomas were isolated using LCM, and the extracted DNA was examined for presence of E. coli DNA by nested PCR amplification of a 135 base-pair segment of the uidA gene. RESULTS: E. coli DNA was detected in microdissected granulomas in 12/15 Crohn's disease patients and in 1/10 non-Crohn's control granulomas (p < 0.001). Also, E. coli DNA was detected in 8/15 Crohn's full-thickness sections and in 4/10 control full-thickness sections. CONCLUSIONS: E. coli DNA may be detected more frequently in Crohn's granulomas than in other non-Crohn's bowel granulomas. This may indicate a tendency for lumenal bacteria to colonize inflamed tissue, or may be due to increased uptake of bacterial DNA by gut antigen presenting cells. In light of previous detection of M. paratuberculosis DNA in Crohn's granulomas, the nonspecific nature of the type of bacterial DNA present in granulomas is evidence against any one bacterium having a significant causative role in Crohn's disease. Copyright 2004 American College of Gastroenterology

PMID: 15307874 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



15 posted on 10/01/2004 6:59:52 AM PDT by aruanan
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To: aruanan

A. The source you are citing is an American Journal, and the author of this piece specifically points out that American Medical Authorities do not accept this thesis.
What he is stating is very true - most scientific communities are extremely conservative and are unwilling to reject current theories unless exposed to overwhelming laboratory evidence that those theories are flawed.

B. Their is no conflict between this new theory and the past history of pathogens. Pathogens mutate and their mutation rates far exceed that of any higher organisms. Most of the pathogens that been historical epidemiological problems arose from continual human expose to some other animal species in which that pathogen originated - small pox from fouls, bubonic plague from rodents, etc.

The fact that Crohn's is increasing in frequency ni the western world, along with irritable bowel syndrome would point to some factor not found in other world populations and this new theory is certainly wirth exploring.

Anyone who is afflcited with either of these disorders or knows a friend or relative who is, is aware of the serious and debilitation consequnces of it.

Crohns not only is disabling - its a killer. It can cause damage to the liver and other vital digestive oragns and lives the victim to a long and painful death.

The individual who was making a joke of this vis-a-vis Kerry's spouse was totally out of line. Crohn's is about as funny as cancer.


38 posted on 10/01/2004 7:26:21 AM PDT by ZULU (Fear the government which fears your guns. God, guts, and guns made America great.)
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To: aruanan

Funny, places like England and France that enforce super pasturization have fewer cases and India where all milk by religion must be heavily boiled also has few cases. The fact that super pasturized milk has a shelf life twice as long or longer then the generic stuff......just ignore all the evidence, what ever.


39 posted on 10/01/2004 7:28:16 AM PDT by jb6 (Truth = Christ)
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To: aruanan

Your argument completely ignores the epidemiological evidence cited by Bennett, which tends to implicate Mycobacteria.

The article also clearly implicates factory farms as a cause for encourgaging spread of Mycobacterial infections in the cow population. In the old days, when people drank unpasteurized milk, it was more likely to come from the family cow or a small herd, with less chance of infection from other animals.

I completely agree that American medicine is often wedded to obsolete models of disease. Our extremely complex and normally brilliantly effective immune system does not foolishly turn on the body's own tissues for no reason. Many so-called autoimmune diseases may in fact be of infectious origin. There is also reason to suspect Mycobacteria as causes of arthritis and prostatitis.


63 posted on 10/01/2004 8:09:42 AM PDT by hellbender
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