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J.D. Salinger's Holden Caulfield, Aging Gracelessly
Washington Post ^ | October 19, 2004 | JONATHAN YARDLEY

Posted on 10/23/2004 6:55:30 AM PDT by jalisco555

Precisely how old I was when I first read "The Catcher in the Rye," I cannot recall. When it was published, in 1951, I was 12 years old, and thus may have been a trifle young for it. Within the next two or three years, though, I was on a forced march through a couple of schools similar to Pencey Prep, from which J.D. Salinger's 16-year-old protagonist Holden Caulfield is dismissed as the novel begins, and I was an unhappy camper; what I had heard about "The Catcher in the Rye" surely convinced me that Caulfield was a kindred spirit.

By then "The Catcher in the Rye" was already well on the way to the status it has long enjoyed as an essential document of American adolescence -- the novel that every high school English teacher reflexively puts on every summer reading list -- but I couldn't see what all the excitement was about. I shared Caulfield's contempt for "phonies" as well as his sense of being different and his loneliness, but he seemed to me just about as phony as those he criticized as well as an unregenerate whiner and egotist. It was easy enough to identify with his adolescent angst, but his puerile attitudinizing was something else altogether.

That was then. This is half a century later. "The Catcher in the Rye" is now, you'll be told just about anywhere you ask, an "American classic," right up there with the book that was published the following year, Ernest Hemingway's "The Old Man and the Sea." They are two of the most durable and beloved books in American literature and, by any reasonable critical standard, two of the worst. Rereading "The Catcher in the Rye" after all those years was almost literally a painful experience.

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtonpost.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: awfulbooks; bookreview; catcherintherye; childabuse; hemmingway; salinger
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Like most high school students I had these books inflicted on me and I've yet to forgive my teachers.
1 posted on 10/23/2004 6:55:31 AM PDT by jalisco555
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To: jalisco555

They pushed these books on us in high school also.

Thank goodness for the internet and Sparknotes.


2 posted on 10/23/2004 6:58:36 AM PDT by TBarnett34 (Can I get an UNNNGH?!)
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To: jalisco555
I've never understood why English teachers choose Old Man and the Sea for the representative Hemingway work. I've always liked For Whom the Bell Tolls better, and while it is longer, it is less obscure.

As for Salinger, I suspect his opinion of himself is higher than merited by a single work, regardless of how relevant it was to an angst-ridden generation in 1951. Let's just say he falls into the category of What Have You Done Lately?

3 posted on 10/23/2004 7:05:54 AM PDT by IronJack (R)
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To: jalisco555
Indeed a case can be made that "The Catcher in the Rye" created adolescence as we now know it, a condition that barely existed until Salinger defined it. He established whining rebellion as essential to adolescence and it has remained such ever since. It was a short leap indeed from "The Catcher in the Rye" to "The Blackboard Jungle" to "Rebel Without a Cause" to Valley Girls to the multibillion-dollar industry that adolescent angst is today.
4 posted on 10/23/2004 7:06:23 AM PDT by atomicpossum (If there are two Americas, John Edwards isn't qualified to lead either of them.)
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To: jalisco555

You have to be just the right age when you read Catcher. As for Old Man...it really was Hemingway at his worst. The only thing it has going for it is the Hemingway "brand," its relatively short length, and easy-to-read Hemingway vocabulary.


5 posted on 10/23/2004 7:06:52 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: IronJack
I've never understood why English teachers choose Old Man and the Sea for the representative Hemingway work.
US education is a leftist monolith? Whatever The Party says they must teach, they must teach?
6 posted on 10/23/2004 7:07:51 AM PDT by samtheman (www.swiftvets.com)
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To: jalisco555
I think this question is the most significant:
Why is Holden Caulfield nearly universally seen as "a symbol of purity and sensitivity" (as "The Oxford Companion to American Literature" puts it) when he's merely self-regarding and callow?
What were the roots of the shallow rebellion of the '60s, the years that warped our culture and continue to plague us? Some critics have argued that the most pernicious ideas of that era were planted still earlier, by the self-styled rebels of the Beat Generation. Salinger, a great hero to the boys of my era, was arguably the most influential of those writers.
7 posted on 10/23/2004 7:09:10 AM PDT by madprof98
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To: jalisco555
Indeed a case can be made that "The Catcher in the Rye" created adolescence as we now know it, a condition that barely existed until Salinger defined it.

To my way of thinking, the dream of adolescence is, and always has been, to enjoy all the adult pleasures without any of the adult responsibilities.

8 posted on 10/23/2004 7:10:13 AM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham ("Ich glaube, du hast in die hosen geschissen!")
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To: jalisco555

I didn't have to read it in highschool but made the mistake of reading it 4-5 years ago.


9 posted on 10/23/2004 7:11:59 AM PDT by elli1
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To: madprof98

The Beat Generation were unashamedly pro-American. They fancied themselves the offspring of Whitman and celebrate the American landscape.

The sixties saw the simultaneous mass marketing of the "hep cat" and perceived disallusionment with the status quo.


10 posted on 10/23/2004 7:13:43 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: jalisco555
I never read "catcher in the Rye" probably because as a girl from a working class family I just couldn't feel sorry for a rich kid slobbering over himself in a rich boarding school. I mean, get a break. I had to work part time and study hard. Who had time for feeling sorry for oneself?

BTW: Wasn't Catcher in the Rye the book in Conspiracy theory, i.e. that was the clue you had been programed by the evil CIA or whatever?
11 posted on 10/23/2004 7:14:28 AM PDT by LadyDoc (liberals only love politically correct poor people)
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To: jalisco555

hated both those books, but especially catcher.


12 posted on 10/23/2004 7:14:41 AM PDT by altura (Kerry & Edwards make me long for the old Clinton-Gore days.)
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To: altura

Try reading Stop Time. Superior to Catch in theme and writing, but never really got a fair shot. And, it can be read and enjoyed at any age.


13 posted on 10/23/2004 7:15:54 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: altura

I cite catcher as The Worst book I have ever read.


14 posted on 10/23/2004 7:16:50 AM PDT by elli1
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To: durasell
"You have to be just the right age when you read Catcher."

I agree. I was in the teen age angst period when I was forced read it. I have a sister who was Phoebe's age at the time and I adored her the way Holden adored Phoebe. Holden became my hero.
I was so impressed, that I ran out and bought "Raise High the Roofbeam". What a piece of crap.

Another book that must be read at precisely the right time is "On the Road" by Jack Kerouac. Great reading for one right out of college or smack in the middle of a midlife crisis.
15 posted on 10/23/2004 7:18:29 AM PDT by Francis McClobber
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To: jalisco555

I read Franny & Zooey, liked it much more than Catcher. Sallinger is a total a-hole, however.


16 posted on 10/23/2004 7:18:55 AM PDT by zook
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To: IronJack
I've never understood why English teachers choose Old Man and the Sea for the representative Hemingway work. I've always liked For Whom the Bell Tolls better, and while it is longer, it is less obscure.

I love talking about Hemingway. Ever since he got hung with the PC "misogynist" label, all his work seems to have been denigrated.

You're right, The Old Man and the Sea was completely different from all of his other works, written at the end of his life when his health was failing.

His entire writing ethic was based on _TRUTH_. The way you started a novel was to write a true sentence, and keep writing them until your novel was complete. His stories took place in the real world, amid real political and physical circumstances. Nothing made up, everything could really happen just the way he wrote it. Same with his dialog, and he was one of the best at dialog, as far as I am concerned.

The Old Man and the Sea, however, was not based on _TRUTH_, it was based on emotion. The constellations the old man sees while battling the fish and taking it home would not have been visible during the time of year the story takes place. All kinds of other things, too, but it's been a while since I read a critique. The point is, as you say, TOMATS is not representative of Hemingway's work.

It was still a nice story, but nothing like my favorite, "The Sun Also Rises."

Now that's a novel. They don't make'em like that anymore.

17 posted on 10/23/2004 7:19:30 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (I actually did vote for John Kerry, before I voted against him.)
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To: elli1
I didn't have to read it in high school but made the mistake of reading it 4-5 years ago.

And you made it all the way through? I salute your courage!

18 posted on 10/23/2004 7:20:17 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity." W. B. Yeats)
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To: hal_walker

I read Catcher too late, at 18 or 19 (don't ask why) and shrugged it off. I agree with you on On The Road, but would add that Desolation Angels should be read a few years later.


19 posted on 10/23/2004 7:21:18 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: zook
I read Franny & Zooey, liked it much more than Catcher. Sallinger is a total a-hole, however.

I never read that. I loved to read (still do, of course) and hated being told what to read when I was in school. The only book I was assigned that I actually enjoyed was "The Portrait of Dorian Gray". Now that was a novel.

20 posted on 10/23/2004 7:22:28 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity." W. B. Yeats)
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To: jalisco555

Sparked a whole genre of similar mind-rot. Judy Blume, Adrian Mole, etc.

Sex, cursing, egotism, broken family ties, etc., all laid out for kids to "identify" with.


21 posted on 10/23/2004 7:22:37 AM PDT by P.O.E. (John Kerry: The" you're rubber and I'm glue" candidate.)
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To: samtheman

After the obligatory reading of this in school, I remember our teacher making similar criticisms as Yardley does in his review. She brought us up short, as we were all seeing Caulfield in a sentimental way, immediately identifying with him. She would have none of it.

Of course- this was several decades ago, when teachers were allowed, even expected, to make moral and value judgements.

An aside- my 7th-grade geography teacher explained in a clear and never-forgotten way how social security would eventually dry up- and that we should begin saving early and often:)


22 posted on 10/23/2004 7:23:08 AM PDT by SE Mom
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I really like the Catcher in the Rye and the movie Valley Girls. I thought they were supposed to be comedies. Well that is how I read them anyway. I also liked Raise High the RoofBeam Carpenters and 7 Short Stories by Salinger.

IMO,lazy parents and the liberals assault on our American values thru everyday resistance to religion, and responsibility and hard work-As well as the creation of the Welfare State by Democrats looking to retain power- have more to do with the decline of our society than some work of fiction by a very silly man.

Just my .02

23 posted on 10/23/2004 7:25:38 AM PDT by Diva Betsy Ross (God bless the Swift Boat Vets!)
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To: durasell
As for Old Man...it really was Hemingway at his worst.

So it WASN'T just me. I never finished it, I thought it was awful.

24 posted on 10/23/2004 7:25:56 AM PDT by .38sw
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To: .38sw

For good Hemingway -- try Sun Also Rises. However, my personal favorites are the Nick Adams Stories. This is a controversial choice for Hemingway enthusiasts, but I can't help it, I really do love those short stories.


25 posted on 10/23/2004 7:27:45 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: durasell

Thanks, I'll give it a look. I read the Catcher in junior high, and I don't remember much about it. I don't think I'll bother with a re-read.


26 posted on 10/23/2004 7:29:43 AM PDT by .38sw
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To: durasell

You are absolutely right. I read (actually listened) to a "On the Road" a couple of years ago and it was a hymn to American landscape, as you suggest. It is the perfectly book to listen to when traveling cross country by car. Kerowac was an acerbic critic of socialism and statism (as was Burroughs).


27 posted on 10/23/2004 7:30:04 AM PDT by Austin Willard Wright
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To: BartMan1; Nailbiter; Forecaster

The Washington Post?


28 posted on 10/23/2004 7:30:29 AM PDT by IncPen (Rosie O'Donut - Celebrity Soap Dodger)
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To: jalisco555
"The Old Man and the Sea." They are two of the most durable and beloved books in American literature and, by any reasonable critical standard, two of the worst.

I remember old man and the sea as an easy exciting read.

I also disagree with the premise that Holden couldn't be a rebel and a softy at heart. Literary critics don't impress me.
29 posted on 10/23/2004 7:31:55 AM PDT by Vision ("When you trust in yourself, you're trusting in the same wisdom that created you")
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To: .38sw

If you are older than the 11-14 year old window for Catcher, then don't bother. But again, Stop Time is a superior book covering the same subject matter.

Also, Sun Also Rises has a favorite line:

"How did you go broke?"
"Two ways, at first slowly, then very quickly."


30 posted on 10/23/2004 7:31:56 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: jalisco555

And you made it all the way through?

Yeah, but not without ''Why am I still reading this piece of crap?'' running thru my mind like one of those TV screen news crawlers.

31 posted on 10/23/2004 7:32:16 AM PDT by elli1
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To: jalisco555

I am a high school English teacher. I've made the following statements many times here at FR and they are appropriate here:

PLEASE get involved with your local school system! Ask to see the curriculum. Find out which books are being taught.

The classics are being phased out for many reasons - some political and some relating to the fact that teachers are giving up because they're "too hard" (read "students too lazy"). However, the biggest reason is that no one is objecting!

Dont' have kids in school? It doesn't matter! It's your tax dollars. It's your community. And, at the risk of sounding melodramatic, it's your country.

If only a few people get together, THEY WILL RESPOND! Adminstrators hate controversy and, believe it or not, many teachers will love you for it.


32 posted on 10/23/2004 7:34:15 AM PDT by Scarchin (Lone conservative teacher)
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To: Austin Willard Wright

Everyone should travel across country by car at least once in their lives. They should be made to stop in small diners and cafes off the interstates and talk with people. I did it the first time many decades ago and the images are as fresh in my mind as if it were last month. It will also fill you with overwhelming love for the country and its people. The perjorative terms "fly over states" and "elites" would vanish from our national vocabulary.


33 posted on 10/23/2004 7:36:00 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: IronJack

A Farewell to arms! bit where they're wiping the dirt off the pasta as they scarf it in the trench---


34 posted on 10/23/2004 7:36:10 AM PDT by wildcatf4f3 (out of the sun)
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To: elli1

I'm surprised that no one has brought up the more recent books in the "I'm rich whoa is me." genre; Bright Lights Big City and Less Than Zero.

I mean c'mon, Robert Downey Jr. performing fellatio due to being in debt to a coke dealer is REALLY far from reality.....

Wait, that happened for real didn't it????


35 posted on 10/23/2004 7:36:13 AM PDT by PittsburghAfterDark
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To: durasell
The Beat Generation certainly were Whitmanesque in the onanistic sense: total self-absorption was their primary value, and that became the one and only value of the generation they spawned. Ever read Myron Magnet's The Dream and the Nightmare? It's supposedly one of George W. Bush's favorite books, and it really gets both the Fifties and the Sixties right.
36 posted on 10/23/2004 7:37:19 AM PDT by madprof98
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To: elli1
Yeah, but not without ''Why am I still reading this piece of crap?'' running thru my mind like one of those TV screen news crawlers.

LOL. I know what you mean. I wonder how many teenagers have been turned into permanent non-readers by being forced to read that book.

37 posted on 10/23/2004 7:38:23 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity." W. B. Yeats)
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To: jalisco555
I have always detested this sappy, trite little story. re: "The Catcher in the Rye" can be fobbed off on kids as a book about themselves. It is required reading as therapy, a way to encourage young people to bathe in the warm, soothing waters of resentment (all grown-ups are phonies) and self-pity without having to think a lucid thought. pretty much sums it up.

Wonder if the affection for this book could be used like an inkblot psy test--to tell conservs from libs? I'd think the classic conserv would regard this book with contempt, and the lib with joy.

38 posted on 10/23/2004 7:38:49 AM PDT by Mamzelle (Fast Eddie and Big Betty--let them sue McDonald's and leave us alone)
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To: atomicpossum
He established whining rebellion as essential to adolescence and it has remained such ever since.

The first time I read Catcher in HS, I too thought it was a manifesto for all adolescents of my era. I ended up reading it again a decade later, and realized it was more of a diagnosis of a mentally unfit individual. I think Salinger originally wrote it as a sad story of a misfit, but then it got picked up and misinterpreted as the voice of generation.

Regarding Hemingway, his best works were his original short stories featuring Nick Adams (ie Hemingway).

39 posted on 10/23/2004 7:38:50 AM PDT by lemura
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To: durasell

Over the years I have read about serial killers being caught with a copy of CITR either in their pocket or @ home. For this reason, I have avoided reading it, that way I can avoid "cracking."


40 posted on 10/23/2004 7:38:52 AM PDT by FreeManWhoCan ("Resistance to tyranny is obedience to God." - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Dialog---yes, I've always wondered why he never wrote a play.


41 posted on 10/23/2004 7:39:26 AM PDT by wildcatf4f3 (out of the sun)
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To: jalisco555
I was just a kid. I loved the Catcher, but The Old Man and the Sea bored me into swearing off Hemingway for two decades.
42 posted on 10/23/2004 7:39:44 AM PDT by Savage Beast (9/11 was never repeated--thanks to President Bush!)
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To: madprof98

Writers, musicians, artists, etc. are self-absorbed by both habit and natural inclination. Luckily, they are just a small segment of the general population.


43 posted on 10/23/2004 7:40:20 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: elli1
All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren is the best novel I have ever read. ATKM stands at the pinnacle; nothing else even comes close in my reading experience.
44 posted on 10/23/2004 7:41:44 AM PDT by elli1
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To: jalisco555

My favourite Hemingway work is "A Farewell to Arms". I've never understood the fixation on J.D. Salinger however - A Catcher in the Rye isn't all that good.

Dare I suggest it would be more productive to read H.P. Lovecraft? ;)

Regards, Ivan


45 posted on 10/23/2004 7:42:04 AM PDT by MadIvan (Gothic. Freaky. Conservative. - http://www.rightgoths.com/)
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To: durasell

For short stories go to Checkov


46 posted on 10/23/2004 7:43:22 AM PDT by wildcatf4f3 (out of the sun)
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To: MadIvan
My favourite Hemingway work is "A Farewell to Arms".

I've never read any Hemingway other than "The Old Man and the Sea". We were actually forced to read that book cover to cover in class while the teacher watched us, than write an essay about it for homework. I was so angry that I've never been able to bring myself to read any other Hemingway. I know I should get over this but I haven't been able to.

47 posted on 10/23/2004 7:46:54 AM PDT by jalisco555 ("The best lack all conviction, while the worst are full of passionate intensity." W. B. Yeats)
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To: wildcatf4f3

Yeah, Checkov is good. But I read the stuff and I keep thinking, Yeah, he's doing this, and this, and this. And from a technical aspect, it's great. Brilliant stuff. But, to admit a shortcoming, I never really loved a book that wasn't written by an American.


48 posted on 10/23/2004 7:48:15 AM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
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To: P.O.E.
Sparked a whole genre of similar mind-rot. Judy Blume, Adrian Mole, etc.

I couldn't stand CITR, but you're absolutely right, it started a whole new and repulsive genre.

When kids are at their most susceptible (junior high school age), teachers urge them to read these horrible stories where everybody in the family seems to be an alcholic, an incest victim, a jailbird, etc., with a whiny heroine who sits around and feels sorry for herself. And this Jerry Springer vision of the universe is pushed as being a reflection of normal everyday life. No wonder many kids seem to be jaded and cynical by the age of 15 now.

49 posted on 10/23/2004 7:48:50 AM PDT by livius
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To: jalisco555
I wonder how many teenagers have been turned into permanent non-readers by being forced to read that book.

More than a few, I'd bet.

The Outsiders is one of the books that kids are req'd to read these days. It's sort of ''catcheresque'' but nowhere near as bad as catcher--which isn't to say that I enjoyed reading it, either.

50 posted on 10/23/2004 7:50:22 AM PDT by elli1
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