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Best states for Homeschooling?

Posted on 11/11/2004 9:09:25 PM PST by atari

which states are the best for homeschooling?

I was going to do some computer research, but I figured it would be better to listen to people who have tried it and how it worked out in their state.


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1 posted on 11/11/2004 9:09:25 PM PST by atari
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To: atari

I can't speak for the state but I didn't have much trouble in Texas.


2 posted on 11/11/2004 9:11:35 PM PST by CindyDawg
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To: atari

Texas is one of the good ones, but even here its not perfect. You should trying doing research at home school websites and google searches.


3 posted on 11/11/2004 9:13:27 PM PST by GeronL (http://images7.fotki.com/v125/photos/2/215708/780411/reow-vi.jpg?1100155138)
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To: atari

Well, it depends on what you are asking. California is so screwed up with normalizing homosexual behavior and forcing out Christianity and such crap, that I would say that it is a REALLY good state to homeschool in.


4 posted on 11/11/2004 9:14:16 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (God is not a Republican. But Satan is definitely a Democrat.)
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To: atari

The best states for homeschooling are probably those with the worst public schools.


5 posted on 11/11/2004 9:17:28 PM PST by freakboy
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To: atari

VA is a good place to homeschool. Especially in Chesterfield county where we live and homeschool our two children. There are many support groups and you don't get any hassle from local school officals as long as your children pass the SOLs(standards of learning).


6 posted on 11/11/2004 9:18:54 PM PST by Ma3lst0rm
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To: atari

I'll venture an educated guess that the worst states for home-schooling are those with the higher concentrations of teacher union's thuggery and the best states for home-schooling are those with lesser union political influence.

Prove me wrong.


7 posted on 11/11/2004 9:19:29 PM PST by quantim (Victory is not relative, it is absolute.)
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To: atari
go to www.hslda.com/ (sorry, sometime the link is hot, and others it's not!) and check their info for each state. It's a very simple seach, just click on the state you want.

Michigan is pretty good...the state pretty much stays out of it.

8 posted on 11/11/2004 9:20:02 PM PST by blu (Red Counties to Blue Counties.."Can you hear us NOW?")
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To: blu; 2Jedismom; PhiKapMom

Ping!


9 posted on 11/11/2004 9:20:46 PM PST by ConservativeMan55 (http://www.osurepublicans.com)
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To: atari

Red States


10 posted on 11/11/2004 9:23:28 PM PST by spycatcher
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To: quantim

I forgot to mention red states are safer for home-schooling, IMO.


11 posted on 11/11/2004 9:24:44 PM PST by quantim (Victory is not relative, it is absolute.)
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To: atari

Pennsylvania has been pretty easy on us.


12 posted on 11/11/2004 9:25:35 PM PST by aviator (Armored Pest Control)
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To: atari

Oklahoma is great. It is not regulated by the State. Lots of peer support.


13 posted on 11/11/2004 9:26:03 PM PST by guitarist (commonsense)
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To: atari

I'd have to say Alaska should rank among the highest for homeschooling. Due to the very nature of our environment, homeschooling is supported by the state and accepted by most, if not everyone. I homeschooled our boys when we lived north of the circle. We had a homeschool instructor/teacher who would come for home visits once a month. Depending on the weather he'd arrive via snowmachine, 4-wheeler or vehicle depending on conditions. We always looked forward to his visits and we'd sip coffee, talk about school, and he'd fill us in on the "outside world".

The program was paid for by the State of Alaska, and sometimes he'd bring us supplies...such as a globe, books for the kids, toys, pencil sharpener, and any other things we needed. Years ago they even supplied cross-country skis for our PE class. LOL

Ah, beautiful memories. I'd light the stove and make breakfast, and the kids would sit at the table in our cabin and we'd "go to school". Only school I know of where the students could wear their long-johns to class. We lived at the edge of the Gates of the Arctic, and I always encouraged them to get their morning studies done before the "light comes"....meaning those meager hours of light when we could be outside without the aid of headlamps. During our "breaks", the boys would play with the two other kids in the valley, and I would go out cross-country skiing with the two gals in the valley.

I know it's not for everyone, and homeschooling is not to be taken lightly. That being said, if you are a dedicated parent, it can work beautifully. The only problem we encountered was when we left up north, and moved to a teensy little town in Interior Alaska and enrolled them in the local school. They were 7th and 8th grade by then. Due to the intensity of our homeschooling program, they were way ahead of students their age in every subject.

All went well though...and they are now two grown men and an asset to society. Our oldest fought in Iraq, and our youngest has set out on his own in the Outside world. He'll be back though...teehee


14 posted on 11/11/2004 9:26:54 PM PST by Chena (military mom)
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To: atari

I'm know folks who homeschool in Idaho, Montana, and Arizona. They are all simply left alone to teach their children as they see fit.


15 posted on 11/11/2004 9:28:17 PM PST by possible
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To: atari

Here's a great place to get started. It's the Home School Legal Defense Association website. You can get information on each state. Here's the link:

http://www.hslda.org/hs/state/default.asp

http://www.hslda.com/

We have home schooled in South Carolina, Kansas, Texas and Washington. Kansas was the best for us. We haven't had any trouble in any of the above. Texas has the fewest regulations, but they are also the least supportive. Washington is the exact opposite. Lots of regulations, but lots of help available through the public schools (testing, sports, elective classes, etc).


16 posted on 11/11/2004 9:32:20 PM PST by Jeremiahs Call
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To: atari
I moved from California back to Maine when my little girl was 5 as I would not put her in public school there -

That was in 1980. I found that public schools are pretty much infiltrated with the same curriculum - bad.

But home schooling was something you could get thrown in jail for - have your child taken away!

I put my daughter in a Christian school and started an organization: "Families For Freedom."

I quickly found myself connecting with other groups, including Phyllis Shafley's "Eagle Forum"...

We fought a long hard battle in the halls of our state capitol - and even in D.C.

Long and short of it - we won. Now Maine is one of the best states for home schooling...widespread and very successful. I'm putting a couple of sites on here for you, but a Google search will give you may more. (Maine is also designated, year after year, in the top 3 safest states to raise children.)

http://www.home-school.com/groups/ME.html

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/regional/Maine.htm

17 posted on 11/11/2004 9:33:12 PM PST by maine-iac7 ( Pray without doubt..."Ask and you SHALL receive")
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To: atari
Actually, California has a very good program for select counties. Wonder if they're red counties?
It's called CAVA, California Virtual Academy and coursework is through K12 out of Pa, iirc.
18 posted on 11/11/2004 9:38:19 PM PST by califamily4W
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To: spycatcher

Utah or other very Red States


19 posted on 11/11/2004 9:38:23 PM PST by alessandrofiaschi
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To: atari

NOT Pennsylvania. Regulations, but no support.


20 posted on 11/11/2004 9:38:33 PM PST by DameAutour ("Go carefully. Be conservative. Be sure you are right - and then don't be afraid")
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To: califamily4W

http://www.hslda.org/hs/state/UT/default.asp


21 posted on 11/11/2004 9:40:04 PM PST by alessandrofiaschi
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To: atari

For sure not Pennsylvania. It's among the worst :( (Somebody help me find an evaluator pleeeeeease!)


22 posted on 11/11/2004 9:40:10 PM PST by Graymatter
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To: Graymatter
Big, very thorough site:

http://homeschooling.gomilpitas.com/

23 posted on 11/11/2004 9:42:45 PM PST by Graymatter
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To: Blood of Tyrants
I homeschooled for 8 years in California. I found a good local private Christian school that had an "indepedent study program." By affiliating with this school, we did not have to file a homeschool affidavit, thus staying under the state radar. There are many, many such independent study programs in this state, with varying levels of oversight and control.

Our site school allowed each family to determine its own curriculum; high school families had additional recordkeeping to document state subject matter requirements. Parents had to attend 4 meetings per year, where we turned in attendance records, quarterly evaluations and/or grades if we chose to grade. The school kept the student "cum" files. The cost was around $125 per year to the school.

It was a perfect situation for us. We had complete control over our curriculum. We also had a support group, a HUGE lending library of books and teaching aids, lots of field trip options, etc. We were free to participate in any of these extra activies, or not, as we chose.

24 posted on 11/11/2004 9:43:07 PM PST by RightField (The older you get ... the older "old" is !)
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To: RightField

oops, forgot to add that we had no state testing requirements in California. I don't know if families who register as their own "private school" have any state testing requirements.


25 posted on 11/11/2004 9:44:32 PM PST by RightField (The older you get ... the older "old" is !)
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To: atari

If you want a bit more objective approach, other than anecdotal evidence, try the Home School Legal Defense Association.

They can tell you which states they've had to fight the most lawsuits in....

http://www.hslda.org/


26 posted on 11/11/2004 9:45:19 PM PST by AnalogReigns ("My conscience is captive to the word of God...to go against conscience is neither right nor safe. ")
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To: atari

This is really off the subject, but seeing that this is a thread dedicated to children I thought I might ask.

Moms out there, I'm having problems weaning my son off the milk bottle, he is refusing milk sippy cups. Any ideas?

I'm desperate :)


27 posted on 11/11/2004 9:45:56 PM PST by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has already been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: atari

Bump


28 posted on 11/11/2004 9:46:59 PM PST by ApesForEvolution ("We trust [RINO-BORKING-ABORTER] Sen. Arlen spRectum's word" - "IF spRectum gets the Chair, IF")
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To: Chena

You are in Alaska, ptarmigan country. While homeschooling, do you see any ptarmigans walk in?


29 posted on 11/11/2004 9:47:03 PM PST by Ptarmigan (Proud rabbit hater and killer)
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To: alessandrofiaschi
Thank you.
Followed your link and based on the legend, California ...

"low regulation: State requires parental notification only."
30 posted on 11/11/2004 9:58:58 PM PST by califamily4W
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To: atari

I don't know about any other states, but I've been perfectly happy with GA. We have to submit attendance records to the county BOE monthly, and have the children do standardized testing in 3rd, 6th, and 9th (and SAT in 12th) grades. Other than that, the BOE washes its hands of us. However, there are so many, many hs'ing families here (and growing rapidly), that support groups are everywhere, as well as a new trend of "hybrid" schools, where the children attend classes one or two days a week, and work at home the others. (My children are attending one of these schools this year, and it is wonderful!) Because of the hybrid schools, and support groups, these hs'ed children get field trips, science fairs, plays, dances, parties, spelling bees, and all the other "goodies" that traditionally schooled kids have, plus the benefits of learning in their jammies!


31 posted on 11/11/2004 9:59:55 PM PST by VRWCer (All things work together for good to them that love God. - Romans 8:28)
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To: Ptarmigan

"You are in Alaska, ptarmigan country. While homeschooling, do you see any ptarmigans walk in?"

LOL! Nope, didn't see any "walk in", but we occasionally bring a few home for dinner.


32 posted on 11/11/2004 10:06:48 PM PST by Chena (military mom)
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To: diamond6
Had trouble each time.
If I ever have another child no bottle :) I'd be embarrassed to tell you how long one daughter held on.
33 posted on 11/11/2004 10:15:37 PM PST by califamily4W
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To: possible

Amen, homeschooling in ARIZONA.


34 posted on 11/11/2004 10:22:13 PM PST by myvoice
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To: diamond6

Well, you could do what my mom did (in frustration). I thought of ba-ba as an entity, therefore one. I was in my highchair, screaming for ba-ba, and she threw it down the basement stairs. It was one of those suddenly-everythings-in-slow-motion moments. Saw it disappear, heard the crash, never asked for it again (not realizing there were 6 more in the fridge). Some say, however, that thats why I...well, we'll leave that for another time. ;-)


35 posted on 11/11/2004 10:26:12 PM PST by I_dmc
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To: diamond6

A good set of earplugs, LOL. I'm blessed, my son was off the bottle at 10mos! My daughter at 1yr. She wanted a cup just like big brother. :)


36 posted on 11/11/2004 10:26:19 PM PST by myvoice
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To: I_dmc

LOL!


37 posted on 11/11/2004 10:27:56 PM PST by myvoice
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To: atari

Arizona's great, though there is some variation by county. Maricopa County is very light on regulation. You have to notifiy the County when you start (or stop) home schooling, and you're required to provide education in four basic subjects (English, math, history, and science, I think). An adjacent county, Pinal I think, requires teacher certification for home schooling.


38 posted on 11/11/2004 10:59:29 PM PST by AZLiberty ("Insurgence" is futile.)
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To: Chena

Oh no, that is me right there! :)


39 posted on 11/11/2004 11:10:37 PM PST by Ptarmigan (Proud rabbit hater and killer)
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To: atari
Delaware is good, but that's only because we fought for our rights.

http://www.dheaonline.org

40 posted on 11/12/2004 3:53:06 AM PST by pray4liberty
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To: atari; 2Jedismom

Texas.


41 posted on 11/12/2004 5:15:33 AM PST by TxBec (Tag! You're it!)
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To: atari

I've home schooled in three states, Wisconsin, South Carolina, and New Hampshire. I was left alone in Wisconsin and New Hampshire. I liked Wisconsin best because we only had to submit the ages of the children we were home schooling, and there were no assessments required. New Hampshire requires a letter of intent with the names and grades of the children and an end-of-year assessment procedure of our choosing. South Carolina was the worst, as we joined SCAIHS and had to submit wordy evaluations every quarter, if I remember correctly. New Hampshire tried to get health information on my kids, and I sicced the HSLDA on them, which put an end to that. I did hear that some people in Wisconsin, who lived in a different school district than we did, got hassled. I think it sometimes depends on who's in charge in your local school district, their attitude toward home schooling, and the amount of time on their hands.


42 posted on 11/12/2004 5:31:07 AM PST by BoomerBabe
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To: califamily4W

My kid is two!


43 posted on 11/12/2004 6:40:29 AM PST by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has already been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: diamond6
Don't worry about it. My mother used to tell me (as she wrestled the ba away from Son # 1) "When he walks across the stage to get his high school diploma, no one is going to ask at what age he was weaned and potty trained!"

She was right, they didn't!

Luckily, both sons' sons (1 1/2 and 8mos.) much prefer the sippy cups, which is a great relief to me. In our families, Grandma (or Mi-mi) is seen as the last resort for bottle, bed and bathroom training. I think it's because I've done it twice and nobody died or required extensive therapy!

44 posted on 11/12/2004 6:52:56 AM PST by blu (Red Counties to Blue Counties.."Can you hear us NOW?")
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To: diamond6

OK, I am a terrible one to ask, being that my kids could sing the alphabet before they gave theirs up, but...

my SIL, who successfully weaned her daughter off of them at about 1 1/2 yrs., is now trying to wean her 1 y.o., and she has some nifty products that are helping. She has some system of sippies that start out with a bottle nipple (but shaped like a cup), then it goes on to moving the nipple part to the edge of the cup, then a really soft sippy spout, then a regular spout. She also has taught him how to drink from a straw, and he thinks that's really cool! So far, he's at the soft sippy spout stage at meals, but he likes a regular bottle of warm milk before bedtime or a nap.

If you think this system might work for you, I will find out for you what brand it is and where she got it (but she's the biggest Target fan I know, so I would have a hunch that's where she got it). Good luck!


45 posted on 11/12/2004 6:58:28 AM PST by VRWCer (All things work together for good to them that love God. - Romans 8:28)
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To: blu

Actually, thats not it. I'm worried about the damage being done to the teeth and his bite. I've tried all the sippy bottles and even the ones that have a silicone tip like a bottle and he absolutely refuses.


46 posted on 11/12/2004 7:09:12 AM PST by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has already been born. Ronald Reagan)
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To: diamond6
If you haven't already tried it, why don't you try giving him only *water* in the bottle. Tell him that if he wants milk (or any other beverages you allow him to drink), he must drink them from a cup.

The idea is to separate the satisfaction of sucking from the taste of the milk.

Since he's two, you might see some real tantrums when you first implement this. Be firm. Be completely consistent. Buy earplugs if necessary. If you are totally consistent, the worst of it should be over in a few days. (And if he's two years old, a couple of days with little or no milk won't do any harm; if it worries you, offer him extra yogurt or cheese to make sure he gets his calcium.)

Of course, whenever he *does* drink from a sippy cup, praise him enthusiastically, especially when he does so without complaining or asking for a bottle.

Once he has come to accept that he only gets water in the bottle, he'll probably lose interest in the bottle altogether. If not, you can phase the bottle out gradually by restricting the bottle to just before naps and bedtime. Then you can eliminate it at naptime, and finally at bedtime. At bedtime, substitute some other soothing activity, like rocking, cuddling, a special tucking-in ritual, and/or a story. (I used this method to wean my oldest son from the pacifier at age three.)

You can also tell your son (if you think he's able to understand) that once he's a "big boy" who doesn't use a bottle anymore, he will get a special reward to celebrate. It doesn't have to be a toy, and it doesn't even have to cost any money - it can be a special outing with Mom or Dad, a play date with friends at his favorite park - anything that he really likes that will help motivate him to cooperate. (Yes, promising a reward helped smooth my 3 year-old's transition away from the pacifier, too.)

Also try to secretly recruit friends and relatives he sees often to praise and encourage him. Sometimes praise is a lot more effective coming from a third party.

If he's really having a tough time giving up the bottle, you might see if his doctor is willing to talk to him about the importance of giving up the bottle. Little kids understand that doctors are authority figures (I guess from seeing their parents ask doctors for advice and take instructions from them), and will often take their instructions more to heart. The downside is that unless you can combine this with a regular checkup, the doctor will probably charge you for an office visit. $$$!

Good luck!
47 posted on 11/12/2004 7:34:36 AM PST by lasisra
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To: atari

We homeschool our three here in Colorado.After we got all of them out of the inept and thoroughly corrupt local school district, we haven't had any problems or interference. Colorado only requires a "letter of intent" to remove them from public school and an evaluation by a private, qualified person every two years.

BTW, I'm looking for Switched-On Schoolhouse subject disks for 6th and 8th grades. Buying them new costs and arm and a leg. If anybody here has the disks or knows someone who does please FReep mail me with a price. I'd really appreciate it.


48 posted on 11/12/2004 7:39:48 AM PST by Types_with_Fist (I'm on FReep so often that when I read an article at another site I scroll down for the comments.)
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To: CindyDawg

Check out the last sentence in this article from HSLDA.org.

http://hslda.org/elert/archive/2004/02/20040217141734.asp

I don't understand why Texas is considered to be the most litigious state concerning homeschooling since it's so easy to homeschool there.


49 posted on 11/12/2004 7:47:52 AM PST by ladylib (MSM is now The Old Media)
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To: maine-iac7

I agree, we too home school here in Maine and think it is one of the easier and best states to do it in.


50 posted on 11/12/2004 7:50:21 AM PST by Preech1 (God, Bless America Please!)
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