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US Dollar has sunk to record lows against Euro
http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=3759014 ^ | me

Posted on 11/27/2004 10:24:13 AM PST by soccer_linux_mozilla

The United States’ trade deficit is soaring and the once high-flying dollar has sunk to record lows against Europe’s common currency.

The dollar’s record low against the euro coincided with the government’s report that the United States was running a trade deficit through September at annual rate of 592 billion dollars. That compares with last year’s record 496 dollars billion. As a result, the country is having to borrow almost 600 billion dollars from overseas this year to pay for the imported cars, televisions and other items Americans are buying.



TOPICS: Business/Economy
KEYWORDS: currency; deficit; dollar; euro; federalreserve; trade; tradedeficit
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To: investigateworld
investigateworld wrote of China "...They don't respect our patent laws, trade market laws..."

I can vouch for that first hand, in Singapore there is a large building, I forget now if it was Sim Lim Tower or Square. About 8 stories tall, very fancy, even had a jade dragon about 8 feet long on the first floor. One of the biggest items for sale, if not the largest, was bootleg America software, all from China.

This was in 2000, I understand that the Singapore government has cracked down since then, I'm not sure if it is available elsewhere on the island. Anyhow it was not bootlegged in Singapore, but China.
351 posted on 11/28/2004 5:38:55 PM PST by fallujah-nuker (I like Ike.)
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To: investigateworld
investigateworld wrote of China "...They don't respect our patent laws, trade market laws..."

I can vouch for that first hand, in Singapore there is a large building, I forget now if it was Sim Lim Tower or Square. About 8 stories tall, very fancy, even had a jade dragon about 8 feet long on the first floor. One of the biggest items for sale, if not the largest, was bootleg America software, all from China.

This was in 2000, I understand that the Singapore government has cracked down since then, I'm not sure if it is available elsewhere on the island. Anyhow it was not bootlegged in Singapore, but China.
352 posted on 11/28/2004 5:39:58 PM PST by fallujah-nuker (I like Ike.)
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To: Paul Ross
There were no conservatives espousing conservative policy at the administration level...with the exception of Donald Rumsfeld and John Ashcroft. And both were muzzled, or undercut by orders from HQ. This is why we had a 51 to 48% electoral split, instead of 60% to 40%.

So then the electorate generally speaking is like a heard of sheep? If a politician starts talking about small government and freedom, the electorate will be lead away from their current affinity toward big government?

That may be true, but how pathetic is that and how liberal is that. Why should any politician be counted on to do that -- when the general electorate doesn't want it.

Small government and freedom is something the electorate has to want and demand. We can't rely on politicians leading us there. That is the very essence of self responsibility, small government and freedom.

The responsibility rests with electorate.

353 posted on 11/28/2004 5:41:30 PM PST by FreeReign
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To: FreeReign
So then the electorate generally speaking is like a heard of sheep?

Perhaps as much as 15% or more. It's at least 25% in Illinois and Minnesota. This is why we FReepers call them the SHeeple.

A conservative is constantly thus having to battle the MSM [ i.e., the malign liberal force of gravity, politically speaking ] to hang onto the SHeeple for the election.

354 posted on 11/28/2004 5:46:35 PM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Southack
They reach a point of throwing good money after bad, it is not enough to hold on to your existing dollar reserves, you need to keep buying more to prop up the value. For China there are also some benefits of a stronger Yuan, one being that her imports would be cheaper for raw materials.

For us the biggest benefit will be the absolute discrediting of free trade. They will be as popular as a prohibitionist in an Irish ward.
355 posted on 11/28/2004 5:48:57 PM PST by fallujah-nuker (I like Ike.)
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To: Dec31,1999

it already does.

I still say, that China is the target here. If we can fight off the yuan peg, the dollar slide against the euro and the yen will then mitigate. the component of the oil price increase due to the weaker dollar, will then also reverse (the component due to the demand increase will be permanent).


356 posted on 11/28/2004 5:49:57 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Paul Ross
Perhaps as much as 15% or more. It's at least 25% in Illinois and Minnesota. This is why we FReepers call them the SHeeple. A conservative is constantly thus having to battle the MSM [ i.e., the malign liberal force of gravity, politically speaking ] to hang onto the SHeeple for the election.

Which was my original point.

liberals + sheeple = people_responsible_for_the_liberal_government_we_have.

357 posted on 11/28/2004 5:52:46 PM PST by FreeReign
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To: Southack
Well, I don't see that happening barring a particularly nasty flu or terrorist attack. I agree that it is mostly supply and demand.

But there may be other forces at work, as well, such as employment.

358 posted on 11/28/2004 5:52:57 PM PST by Dec31,1999 (www.protestwarrior.com)
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To: oceanview

But wouldn't that have been much easier and lucrative if we had put a 10% tarrif on Chinese goods four years ago? Other countries do it. Why do we have to be the world's _____?


359 posted on 11/28/2004 6:08:25 PM PST by Dec31,1999 (www.protestwarrior.com)
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To: Dec31,1999

of course. but GATT, and MFN and WTO all preclude that.


360 posted on 11/28/2004 6:30:17 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Dec31,1999
Dec31,1999 asked "But wouldn't that have been much easier and lucrative if we had put a 10% tariff on Chinese goods four years ago? Other countries do it. Why do we have to be the world's _____?"

No no, of course it would avoided shipping our industrial base to China and allowing China to build a large hoard of dollars but it would have violated free trade theory. With the free trade gang it is theology.
361 posted on 11/28/2004 6:48:58 PM PST by fallujah-nuker (I like Ike.)
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To: expat_panama
Whether or not we are better off (we are) is irrelevant. Basically, you're saying that inflating the hell out of the currency is good because it, for some odd logic, is directly related to improvements in the availability of those product or our lifestyle in general.

I posit that under a stable currency system, many of those items would have fallen in price. The means of production of each one, scale of available transport and variety or types are cheaper and more efficient today. By any rights, they should be cheaper.

Also, each and every one of those items can be currently purchased for at or below the quantity of silver or gold that would purchase them in 1900, for the reasons I've outlined. Additionally, the price of the sugar, butter, and train ticket are directly and majorly subsidized by taxpayer money, FWIW.

362 posted on 11/28/2004 7:50:37 PM PST by Axenolith (This space for rent...)
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To: Southack; jpsb
Nonsense. Examine the hottest regions of economic growth, such as LA out in California. Notice that their real estate is not going down in price (the definition of deflation).

Price movements due to supply and demand in a market are neither inflation nor deflation. For instance, if the money supply is held constant and the prices for houses in California go up, then the prices for something else in the economy must go down to balance it out.

I'll repeat. Economic growth (more goods and services being produced) is deflationary.

363 posted on 11/29/2004 1:52:22 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: Moonman62
That does appear to match this rule, asumming the money supply does not go up too.

The supply of other goods goes up.

364 posted on 11/29/2004 2:05:54 AM PST by jpsb
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To: expat_panama
OTOH, were we really better off in 1900?

Inflation has nothing to do with us being better off today. It's a correlation not a cause. However, I do feel better that much more powerful computers are available today at just a fraction of the cost of what they were in the 1980's.

365 posted on 11/29/2004 2:10:18 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: Southack
If you import more than you export, then your currency is overvalued. If you export more than you import, then your currency is undervalued.

That's it. That's the test. That's what the "free market" examines when valuing currencies.

That's your test, and there is no factual basis to it. I just got through reading a Federal Reserve study that looked at 25 countries that corrected account deficits. The link to it is here.

http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/2000/692/default.htm

366 posted on 11/29/2004 2:26:23 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: expat_panama; Moonman62
Try correlating prices from 1970 to current. Food prices are stagnant while others dropped significantly. The CPI doesn't reflect those changes. How many times do you buy durable good?
367 posted on 11/29/2004 2:28:38 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: Southack
That's just so very, very wrong. GWB isn't *doing* anything.

Here's a little test: tell this forum *what* GWB is physically doing to the Dollar (you can't name it, by the way).

Actually, it's the Treasury that buys or sells dollars on the open market. The official name for it is intervention, and when it's done the Treasury issues a press realease. While it's true that the Treasury hasn't intervened, it hasn't had to. Our current weak dollar has come from low interest rates and jawboning, along with some cooperation from Japan and some stupidity from the EU. GWB's weak dollar policy is the worst kept secret in Washington. If you don't believe it you don't have to, but it puts you in the extreme minority.

368 posted on 11/29/2004 2:33:51 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: B4Ranch
This type of article isn't even looked at by the 'true' FReeper Republicans because "The Man" can do "NO WRONG".

That's because "The Man" is BRILLIANT and WALKS ON WATER and the GREATEST and MOST CONSERVATIVE president in US history, and anyone who doesn't think so is a HATE-AMERICA-FIRST, TINFOIL-HAT TERRORIST-LOVER.

(Of course, I'm just a loserdopian who voted for Badnarik).

369 posted on 11/29/2004 2:34:01 AM PST by Commie Basher
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To: rdb3
Yeah. It sucks that Bush won reelection, doesn't it?

I think so.

370 posted on 11/29/2004 2:35:42 AM PST by Commie Basher
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To: fallujah-nuker; Southack; Moonman62
"Is their an American banana industry overcome with joy at the prospects the weak dollar will make banana imports more expensive? "

I don't know about the banana industry, but there are 98 trade associations, representing the country's largest manufacturing and agricultural trade groups that say U.S. dollar "is not becoming too weak...In fact, the dollar is still too strong."

Welcome to the Coalition for a Sound Dollar

371 posted on 11/29/2004 2:48:03 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: expat_panama; sphinx

372 posted on 11/29/2004 2:52:34 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: endthematrix
I don't know about the banana industry, but there are 98 trade associations, representing the country's largest manufacturing and agricultural trade groups that say U.S. dollar "is not becoming too weak...In fact, the dollar is still too strong."

Don't you think they have a bit of a conflict of interest?

373 posted on 11/29/2004 3:03:46 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: endthematrix

I'd like to see that same chart going back to 1960 or so.


374 posted on 11/29/2004 3:04:22 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: jpsb
Will Bush like Hoover get blamed for a crash and stick us we another 60 years of socialist Democratic rule? Keep your eye on the dollar.

The Fed will monetize our debt, ie drop dollars from helicopters to forestall a drop in our standard of living.

Get ready for hyperinflation, the 70s were a cakewalk compared to this mess and gold is headed to $3000+.

That's when we get Volcker back in, he's willing to apply the tourniquet and sacrifice the arms and legs to save the body (as he did in the 80s).


BUMP

375 posted on 11/29/2004 3:13:46 AM PST by tm22721 (In fac they)
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To: Moonman62

Wouldn't it (dollar) have some weight going further back. Due to less manipulation from all the various mechanisms that fluctuate it today? My reply was to expats chart that went to the 70's. My point was to help focus the modern dilemma of a high dollar, not the historical.


376 posted on 11/29/2004 3:14:19 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: endthematrix
But if you go back past the 1970's it's apparent that the dollar isn't overvalued. It was devalued significantly in the early 1970's. The dollar has been pretty much been manipulated throughout the industrial era, the government has just found different clever ways to do it. The most significant was probably the Bretton Woods agreement from the early 1940's to the early 1970's. It was just one of the many monstrosities that FDR left us.
377 posted on 11/29/2004 3:19:25 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: Moonman62

No. The high dollar encourages US imports and discouraged US exports.


378 posted on 11/29/2004 3:23:04 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: tm22721
Get ready for hyperinflation, the 70s were a cakewalk compared to this mess and gold is headed to $3000+.

The 1970's inflation was triggered by massive government overspending and corruption that caused the collapse of the Bretton Woods foreign exchange system. There is no danger of that magnitude today.

That's when we get Volcker back in, he's willing to apply the tourniquet and sacrifice the arms and legs to save the body (as he did in the 80s).

Volcker isn't that smart. He raised interest rates the way he did with Reagan's approval in support of his strong currency policy. Don't let the Left fool you into thinking that Volcker was or is some kind of Genius. It was all Reagan.

379 posted on 11/29/2004 3:25:35 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: endthematrix
That's true, but the majority of the corporations in our economy are not exporters. Those who are have a conflict of interest when they support policies that benefit them and no one else.
380 posted on 11/29/2004 3:34:06 AM PST by Moonman62 (Federal Creed: If it moves tax it. If it keeps moving regulate it. If it stops moving subsidize it.)
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To: Moonman62

Well if you cease to produce as a nation, you will cease to be a superpower.


381 posted on 11/29/2004 3:45:09 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: Paul Ross; hchutch; Southack
Just think how much industry we would still have if China were compelled by a canny U.S. policy to BUY $120 billion annually of U.S. manufactures (not industrial plant, but manufactures) instead. The Free Fall of U.S. manufacturing, steel, automotive, machine tools, semiconductors, circuit boards, and engineering...would be slowed.

Wow. You want industrial subsidies to go along with agricultural subsidies, while supposedly championing "small government."

BTW, the current slide in the value of the dollar can be traced to the actions of a certain Bush-hating palindrome-surnamed currency speculator.

382 posted on 11/29/2004 6:04:33 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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To: Axenolith
... you're saying that inflating the hell out of the currency is good...

Zowie!  I had no idea I was saying that-- thanks for the heads up because I'd never have known that without your help.  Ok, I was wrong to advocate run away inflation and I really do apologize; please give me another chance.   What I'd really like to get across (and maybe you can help me a bit on the right wording) is something to the tune of how nominal prices are all well and good, but what matters more to me is whether or not we die because we can't feed ourselves. 

IOW, food prices and wages both go up or down.  As long as wages end up higher than food we don't starve.   Our Creator has blessed us with prosperous times; i.e. more and more people can feed themselves with less effort than was possible in past generations.  Normally I love complaining as much as the next guy, but maybe in this case ingratitude would a sin.

383 posted on 11/29/2004 8:34:22 AM PST by expat_panama
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To: endthematrix; Moonman62
the dollar is still too strong....

I agree with the manufacturers.   The graph shows that we want a dollar trading like it did during the economic expansion of the '90's, and not like it's been trading during the recession of '01- '02..

384 posted on 11/29/2004 8:52:05 AM PST by expat_panama
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To: Poohbah
Subsidies poppycock, you constantly get it wrong. First , you fail to acknowledge that it its the Chinese that are "subsidizing" things. By direct governmental interference. To get them to STOP the interference is not, reciprocally, U.S. "subsidy". Sheeesh! Whatever did they teach you Marines at Quantico?

THis would be direct national defense against a foreign national governmental attack upon our country. Only government can counter government. We would merely use our diplomatic levers, i.e., whatever it takes, to get them to stop what they are doing via GOVERNMENT INTERFERENCE.

We need to play hardball. No more Mr. Nice Guy.

385 posted on 11/29/2004 10:05:08 AM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Paul Ross
Subsidies poppycock, you constantly get it wrong. First , you fail to acknowledge that it its the Chinese that are "subsidizing" things. By direct governmental interference. To get them to STOP the interference is not, reciprocally, U.S. "subsidy".

Actually, it is...and if China really IS subsidizing things, then they're losing money.

Sheeesh! Whatever did they teach you Marines at Quantico?

I didn't go to Quantico. I worked for a living.

386 posted on 11/29/2004 10:10:51 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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To: Poohbah; Southack
Actually, it is...and if China really IS subsidizing things, then they're losing money.

Nope, again you get it wrong, as they treat this as just the cost of business. And in dollar flows, they aren't losing anything. Not while we prop them up with investment flows and the $600 billion trade imbalance. They have $500 billion hoarded. They "invest" $120 Billion annually in stupid currency manipulation to keep the "peg" against the dollar fixed. Are you so monomaniacal as to deny that they are doing that? You are aware that a ton of economists have confirmed it is in fact happening. And what do they get out of these "subsidies" which in fact do nothing to help our industry...just our consumption of THEIR stuff?

They get our industry.

If we just DEMANDED that if they wanted to continue trading with us, that this $120 billion annually be spent on our manufactures (cars, tires, ships, planes, semiconductors, hard drives, new machine tools, etc.), or forget it, they are embargoed... that is NOT subsidy. It is a government response to the malicious conduct of a foreign government.

You have been consistently wrong about the Chinese economy. You were wrong about their "banking crisis". They do just throw $100 billion or so into the "failed" banks every 4 years, just like we saved CitiBank. Likewise, you are wrong about their intentions to make these industrial relocations...PERMANENT.

Whose side are you really on?

387 posted on 11/29/2004 10:35:18 AM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Paul Ross; Southack; hchutch
Nope, again you get it wrong, as they treat this as just the cost of business.

They're still losing money.

And in dollar flows, they aren't losing anything. Not while we prop them up with investment flows and the $600 billion trade imbalance.

They're losing money right now, which is why they're screaming bloody murder about the falling dollar.

They have $500 billion hoarded. They "invest" $120 Billion annually in stupid currency manipulation to keep the "peg" against the dollar fixed.

And now they're screaming bloody murder, because their policy of fixing their currency to ours just started biting 'em in the a$$.

Are you so monomaniacal as to deny that they are doing that? You are aware that a ton of economists have confirmed it is in fact happening.

Yeah, it's happening.

I like it when my opponents do stupid and useless things. It means that they're wasting an opportunity to do something that will really hurt me in the long run.

And what do they get out of these "subsidies" which in fact do nothing to help our industry...just our consumption of THEIR stuff?

They get enough cash flow to service some bad loans.

If we just DEMANDED that if they wanted to continue trading with us, that this $120 billion annually be spent on our manufactures (cars, tires, ships, planes, semiconductors, hard drives, new machine tools, etc.), or forget it, they are embargoed... that is NOT subsidy. It is a government response to the malicious conduct of a foreign government.

It's a subsidy. The subsidization would be indirect, but it would be very real. It would be as much of a subsidy as the federal government telling you that you must buy $X of American-made goods, or that they'd forbid you to work.

388 posted on 11/29/2004 10:42:25 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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To: Poohbah
if China really IS subsidizing things...

Is that your position? That it is only hypothetical? Mythic? And the Yuan just stays pegged by magic? Some "invisible hand"?

Never mind the extremely "visible hand" of Bejing...pay no attention to that man behind the curtain...

389 posted on 11/29/2004 10:43:02 AM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Moonman62
"I'll repeat. Economic growth (more goods and services being produced) is deflationary."

And I'll repeat: You're clueless.

Economic growth is not deflationary. Office rental prices do NOT deflate just because you have a hot economic zone. Home prices do not decline in economic boom towns (look at Vegas, please). Salaries do not decline when your company is growing.

In short, where you see economic growth you see very little deflation, save for very efficient finished products.

390 posted on 11/29/2004 10:45:01 AM PST by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Paul Ross; hchutch; Southack
Is that your position? That it is only hypothetical? Mythic? And the Yuan just stays pegged by magic? Some "invisible hand"?

If it's really a subsidy, then it's eating away at China's profit margin, which is already razor-thin.

You cannot subsidize low-margin manufacturing without...LOSING MONEY!

391 posted on 11/29/2004 10:47:08 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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To: Moonman62
If you import more than you export, then your currency is overvalued. If you export more than you import, then your currency is undervalued. That's it. That's the test. That's what the "free market" examines when valuing currencies. - Southack

"That's your test, and there is no factual basis to it." - Moonman62

On the contrary, the factual basis behind that test is called: reality.

To illustrate the concept, simply consider a narrow test case of two island nations trading only with each other. When one exports more to the other than it imports, it will have a surplus of the currency from the other island.

Do you know what a surplus does to supply and demand and price?

Answer that question and then you'll finally be in an intellectual position to consider the initial currency test mentioned above.

392 posted on 11/29/2004 10:49:27 AM PST by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Poohbah
I like it when my opponents do stupid and useless things.

And if they are in fact not-so-stupid, but way ahead of you...as you don't know what they intend once they have debased our industrial capability...

Just what are you going to do when you realize what they are up to and have finally seen the checkmate 3 moves ahead...

They're still losing money.

It's only money. Paper IOUs. They are playing for keeps.

393 posted on 11/29/2004 10:50:04 AM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Moonman62
"Our current weak dollar has come from low interest rates and jawboning, along with some cooperation from Japan..." - Moonman62

No. Japan isn't "cooperating." Japan is *opposed* to letting the Dollar fall (it makes Japanese exports to the U.S. too expensive). Where do you people come up with such wild-eyed "theories" as Japan cooperating with the Dollar's decline?

Greenspan warns Japan against currency intervention
Wednesday, March 3, 2004 at 08:00 JST
NEW YORK — U.S. Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan issued a warning Tuesday against Japan's continued massive currency market intervention aimed at stemming the yen's appreciation against the dollar.

http://www.japantoday.com/e/?content=news&cat=3&id=290378


394 posted on 11/29/2004 10:54:43 AM PST by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Paul Ross; hchutch; Southack
And if they are in fact not-so-stupid, but way ahead of you...as you don't know what they intend once they have debased our industrial capability...

Oh my God, what WILL we do when they cut off the supply of pet chew toys?

We still have a massive industrial capacity.

In the meantime, we are helping the PLA to become a mercantilist army dominated by businessmen-in-uniform instead of a warfighting army dominated by those who can actually fight wars.

Just what are you going to do when you realize what they are up to and have finally seen the checkmate 3 moves ahead...

The ChiComs are only a few moves away from reaping the "blessings" (heh-heh-heh) of totalitarianism--namely, societal collapse.

My guess: by 2020, we'll be reestablishing the Yangtze Patrol to defend American trade interests against the predations of the Japanese and the EU.

395 posted on 11/29/2004 10:58:01 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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To: Poohbah
We still have a massive industrial capacity.

Really? Precisely where is it?

396 posted on 11/29/2004 11:00:13 AM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Moonman62
there are 98 trade associations, representing the country's largest manufacturing and agricultural trade groups that say U.S. dollar "is not becoming too weak...In fact, the dollar is still too strong.

"Don't you think they have a bit of a conflict of interest?" - Moonman62

Since when is putting America first a "conflict of interest"?

397 posted on 11/29/2004 11:00:22 AM PST by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Paul Ross
Really? Precisely where is it?

Across the fruited plain.

398 posted on 11/29/2004 11:00:52 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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To: Poohbah
Across the fruited plain.

Not an answer.

399 posted on 11/29/2004 11:02:12 AM PST by Paul Ross (Paid For By SwiftGeese Veterans For Truth)
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To: Paul Ross
Not an answer.

Tango Sierra, Delta Alfa.

400 posted on 11/29/2004 11:04:29 AM PST by Poohbah (Crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and hear the lamentations of their women!)
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