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Jewelry From 3rd Millennium BC Discovered In Southwest Iran
Tehran Times ^ | 12-6-2004

Posted on 12/06/2004 4:37:16 PM PST by blam

Jewelry from 3rd millennium B.C. discovered in southwest Iran

Tehran Times Culture Desk

TEHRAN (MNA) –- Ancient Iranians were fond of jewelry almost 4300 years ago and were highly skilled in producing jewelry and ornaments, Iranian archaeologists have concluded based on discoveries they made during their recent excavations at the ancient site of Shahdad in Kerman Province.

According to the head of the archaeological team, Mir-Abedin Kaboli, archaeologists discovered the ruins of a developed city with industrial and residential areas and a graveyard after fourteen stages of excavations.

“Many artifacts including rare stones, jewelry, engraved stones, and jeweler’s tools were found at the site, proving that ancient Iranians were major producers of jewelry in ancient times,” he added. The ancient residents of Shahdad used silver, lead, turquoise, lapis lazuli, and ruby to make jewelry, Kaboli said, adding, “The local residents used to bring in turquoise from Afghanistan, lapis lazuli from Neishabur, and shells from the southern coast of Iran; make the jewelry, and later export it to different regions such as Central Asia, Pakistan, India, and countries on the southern coast of the Persian Gulf.”

He also noted that a large cache of ornaments, including necklaces, earrings, and bracelets, has also been discovered in Shahdad’s ancient graveyard.

The recent excavations show that the men and women of ancient Shahdad were buried with their jewelry on their wrists, necks, and ears over 4000 years ago, he noted.

The ancient site of Shahdad is located in the western part of the Lut Desert in Kerman Province and covers an area of 60 square kilometers. The oldest awl ever discovered in Iran and several unique statues have been found at the historical site.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 3rd; archaeology; bc; discovered; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; iran; jewlery; millennium; southwest

1 posted on 12/06/2004 4:37:19 PM PST by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 12/06/2004 4:37:56 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

I'm sure this is an afront to Islam and must be destroyed.


3 posted on 12/06/2004 4:38:45 PM PST by konaice
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To: blam

One thing they didn't find was the head-to-toe Islamic uniform for females.


4 posted on 12/06/2004 4:39:01 PM PST by xJones
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To: blam

BTTT


5 posted on 12/06/2004 4:39:45 PM PST by Fiddlstix (This Tagline for sale. (Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: blam

Shipping is SO slow at this time of year.


6 posted on 12/06/2004 4:41:22 PM PST by T'wit (Not knowing right from wrong is [a] liberal philosophy and [b] the definition of criminal insanity.)
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To: blam

Shipping is SO slow at this time of year.


7 posted on 12/06/2004 4:42:04 PM PST by T'wit (Not knowing right from wrong is [a] liberal philosophy and [b] the definition of criminal insanity.)
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To: T'wit

Oops. I checked and it wasn't there. I checked again and there were two. It is beyond the understanding.


8 posted on 12/06/2004 4:43:25 PM PST by T'wit (Not knowing right from wrong is [a] liberal philosophy and [b] the definition of criminal insanity.)
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To: Fiddlstix
Iranian-British team studying Bushehr’s archaeological sites

Tehran Times Culture Desk

TEHRAN (MNA) -- A team of British and Iranian archaeologists is currently studying the archaeological sites in Bushehr, the director of the Bushehr Cultural Heritage and Tourism Department announced on Sunday.

Comprised of archaeologists from Iran’s Cultural Heritage and Tourism Organization (CHTO) and experts from Britain’s University of Durham, the team began its work in late November in Bushehr Province on the northern coast of the Persian Gulf, added Ardeshir Mohammadi Bagh-Molla’i.

Bushehr is the capital city of Bushehr Province in southwestern Iran and is located on the Persian Gulf.

The British Academy, the British Institute of Persian Studies, and another group from London are sponsoring the project. The team is led by Dr. Robert Carter from the University of Durham and Hassan Tofiqian, an expert from the CHTO’S Center for Archaeological Studies.

The team is surveying the potential of the region for upcoming studies with the aim of precisely locating and mapping archaeological sites.

Bushehr Province has many potential archaeological sites, some located in urban areas, and more Iranian and foreign archaeologists are expected to work here in the future, Mohammadi said.

The team also intends to study regional settlements from the Chalcolithic periods (7000?-3500? B.C.).

Studies which have been carried out over the years show that the Persian Gulf was a trade center during the Elamite, Achaeminid, Parthian, Sassanid, and Islamic eras and traces of these civilizations have been unearthed in the region, Mohammadi stated.

Two experts from the University of Pennsylvania are to join the team to study the changes in the coastline and damage to potential archaeological sites caused by the rise in the sea level, he said in conclusion.

9 posted on 12/06/2004 4:43:47 PM PST by blam
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To: T'wit
Experts studying mysterious burial tradition at Bam Citadel

Tehran Times Culture Desk

TEHRAN (MNA) –- The team of experts working at the ruins of the Bam Citadel is trying to shed light on the reasons why children were buried within the walls of the citadel in ancient times, it was announced here on Saturday.

Archaeologists have discovered a number of ancient skeletons in the ruins of the Bam Citadel. The remains of forty-nine children have been found within the walls so far.

Anthropologist Asghar Karimi said that many of the questions of archaeologists and other experts could be answered if the reasons why children were buried within the walls of the citadel in ancient times were ascertained.

“The team working on the project is hoping to find the probable roots of such a tradition by interviewing the old residents of the area,” the member of the expert team added.

Such a mysterious tradition has not been observed in any other historical region of the country, Karimi said.

Anthropologist Farzad Foruzanfar also mentioned that the initial studies on the remains show that they are from the Islamic era, and no sign of disease has been observed in them.

“They were children aged between one month and eight years old, both boys and girls,” he added.

The Bam Citadel was almost completely destroyed by a massive earthquake on December 26, 2003.

10 posted on 12/06/2004 4:47:26 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
The team is surveying the potential of the [Bushehr] region for upcoming studies with the aim of precisely locating and mapping archaeological sites.

They best get on with it -- before the region becomes contaminated with radioactive materials from the (former) Bushehr reactor.

11 posted on 12/06/2004 4:51:35 PM PST by TXnMA (Back home in God's Country -- and that's where I plan to stay until they "plant" my carcass here!)
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To: konaice
It certainly indicates how far back the evil of Capitalism and free-market economies is rooted. Imagine, exploiting other countries for their natural resources, using your own industry to create a product, and then exporting that product for profit.
There should have been a global council established (such as the UN) to greatly restrict the mining, the industry, and to skim a little of the profit off the top.
12 posted on 12/06/2004 4:53:19 PM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (I'm fresh out of tags. I'll pick some up tomorrow.)
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To: blam

Persians not Iranians.


13 posted on 12/06/2004 4:57:31 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: blam

Hmmmmm...Persian women like jewelery...shocking.


14 posted on 12/06/2004 5:07:49 PM PST by sarah_f (Know Islam, Know Terror.)
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To: nickcarraway
"Persians not Iranians."

Yup. (I just posted on your LED thread, lol)

15 posted on 12/06/2004 5:12:59 PM PST by blam
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To: T'wit
Happens all the time..its that space-time continuum, pair a ducks, thing.

Metaphors be with you.
16 posted on 12/06/2004 5:14:08 PM PST by concretebob (Power perceived, is power achieved)
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To: nickcarraway

Or Sumerian


17 posted on 12/06/2004 5:14:52 PM PST by concretebob (Power perceived, is power achieved)
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To: blam

Did they find any gormeh sabzi?


18 posted on 12/06/2004 5:28:59 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: blam
Surprising that there was no gold mentioned as Iranian gold was later so highly prized.
19 posted on 12/06/2004 8:47:11 PM PST by Mike Darancette (RICE '08)
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To: sarah_f
Hmmmmm...Persian women like jewelery...shocking.

As I often tell my fellow jewelers, we're engaged in the world's second oldest profession.

20 posted on 12/06/2004 8:51:31 PM PST by Bernard Marx (Don't make the mistake of interpreting my Civility as Servility)
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To: blam; FairOpinion; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; A.J.Armitage; ...
Thanks Blam.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

21 posted on 12/06/2004 10:45:11 PM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
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