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Iranian Alert - December 26, 2004 - "Unclear UFO's worry Tehran"
Regime Change Iran ^ | 12/26/04 | Freedom44

Posted on 12/25/2004 9:54:19 PM PST by freedom44



Top News

- By Ali Akbar Dareini

Tehran: Iran’s Air Force has been ordered to shoot down any unknown or suspicious flying objects in Iran’s airspace, an Air Force spokesman said on Saturday amid state-media reports of sightings of flying objects near Iran’s nuclear installations.

"All anti-aircraft units and jet fighters have been ordered to shoot down the flying objects in Iran’s airspace," spokesman of the regular Army, Air Force Colonel Salman Mahini, said.

Flying object fever has gripped Iran after dozens of reported sightings in the summer and in recent weeks. State-run media has reported sightings of unknown objects flying over parts of Iran where nuclear facilities are located.

"The unidentified flying objects could be satellites, comets or spying or reconnaissance craft trying to monitor Iran’s nuclear installations," Col. Mahini said.

"Flights of unknown objects in the country’s airspace have increased in recent weeks ... (they) have been seen over Bushehr and Isfahan provinces," the daily Resalat reported on Saturday. There are nuclear facilities in both provinces. The timing of the reported increase in sightings, which comes as the United States is urging allies to confront Iran over its nuclear programme, has strengthened Iranian public perception that the objects are surveillance or hostile aircraft monitoring Iran.

Iran’s Air Force Chief, Gen. Karim Ghavami, was quoted in Iranian newspapers on Saturday as saying that Iran was fully prepared to defend any threat to its nuclear installations. "We have arranged plans to defend nuclear facilities from any threat. Iran’s Air Force is watchful and prepared to carry out its responsibilities," Gen. Ghavami was quoted as saying.

The Resalat had reported that "shining objects" in the sky were seen near Natanz — where Iran’s uranium enrichment plant is located — and one had exploded, causing "concern and panic in the region".

According to Col. Mahini, Iran’s pilot training centre in Tehran will organise a two-day scientific conference in March to shed more light on the flying objects. The conference is scheduled for March 8-9. (AP)


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: armyofmahdi; aurora; axisofevil; axisofweasels; ayatollah; binladen; callingartbell; cleric; elbaradei; eu; freedom; germany; humanrights; iaea; insurgency; iran; iranianalert; iraq; islamicrepublic; japan; journalist; kazemi; khamenei; khatami; khatemi; lsadr; moqtadaalsadr; mullahs; napalminthemorning; neoeunazis; persecution; persia; persian; politicalprisoners; protests; rafsanjani; religionofpeace; revolutionaryguard; rumsfeld; russia; satellitetelephones; shiite; southasia; southwestasia; studentmovement; studentprotest; terrorism; terrorists; ufo; us; vevak; wot
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To: Kurt_D
Anne get your gun
21 posted on 12/25/2004 10:29:50 PM PST by mastercylinder (This country was founded on freedom so you're free to love it or leave it)
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To: Swiss
Re: sightings near nuclear weapons

In the US there is the report that UFO's were sight at a US base (by many witnesses) and later that the codes were changed on the weapons. I attempted to find the actual report (happened in the 70's) but found this on the correlation of UFO's and nuclear sites.

http://www.ufoevidence.org/topics/nuclear.htm
22 posted on 12/25/2004 10:34:34 PM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: freedom44

Lost Generation of Iran Seeks Escape
Many young people turn to drugs or suicide. Others find respite in music or the mountains.

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-iranyouth26dec26,0,2335496.story?coll=la-home-headlines

By Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer


TEHRAN — Their cheeks were bitten by the threat of snow, but the sisters didn't have anywhere else to go. They'd coated their faces with makeup and painted their eyelashes until they looked too heavy to blink, gaudy faces to offset drab denims and black coats. This afternoon, their spirits hung as low as the brooding clouds over the mountains.

"This country is very dirty," said Mansureh, a pale 23-year-old who answers telephones at a law firm because she wasn't accepted to any of Iran's universities. "Nobody likes the regime, especially the youth. There are so many restrictions, we can't do anything."

It was Friday afternoon, time for prayers in the Islamic Republic, but the sisters and hundreds of other young Iranians trekked into the mountains on the outskirts of Tehran instead. Droves of twentysomethings flooded the rocky paths as if they were going somewhere in particular — a concert or a rally. But there was nothing at the top; they were simply climbing their way out of the smoggy urban mazes.

The mountains were alive with hormones and directionless potential. Forget black robes and beards; Iran's almost-adults dressed as if they'd just come from a rave, with faded running shoes and aviator glasses shoved high into their hair. They slouched along, glassy-eyed and smoking cigarettes. Many of them looked stoned. Boys and girls held hands. The winter light slanted through the dying trees. The mood was nihilistic.

"I think the government wants the youth to be on drugs so they keep quiet," said Mansureh's sister, a 17-year-old high school student who also gave only her first name, Mona. "They say it's a problem, but they're the ones importing it."

As their government squares off against the West and vague rumors of outside intervention run in the streets, the youth of Tehran move through the months as if dreaming, passing moodily from pop culture to Persian traditions, groping for their place in the world. Conversations with dozens of teens and twentysomethings in Tehran in recent weeks painted an overwhelming picture of a generation lost, disaffected and stained by longing.

"I'd like to start a new life," said Mansureh, her words hanging in tea steam, "somewhere else."

Like many young Iranians, the two sisters chafe at a strict Islamic government but drop into lethargy when it comes to politics.

The previous night, they'd been kicked out of a shopping center by a government morality squad. Run-ins with police are common; the two say they use their pocket money to bribe their way out of trouble. Their friends have turned to drugs or even suicide.

A quarter of a century ago, Iran's fiery youth drove a revolution in the name of Islam and anti-imperialism. But those students grew up, and their zeal faded as they softened into graying bureaucrats. The babies they birthed en masse at the feverish urging of the mullahs have inherited a legacy of double-digit unemployment, widespread drug addiction and gnawing religious disillusionment.

"There aren't any jobs for us," complained Rahim Keab, a 21-year-old soldier in a dirty khaki coat who made his way across a city park under a steely winter sky. He and four friends drifted to Tehran months ago from a farming village in the southwest. Now they are languishing. Keab doesn't know what he will do when his military service is over.

"Young people want to get married, but first they need work," Keab said. "So instead they start to smoke [opium], and they get addicted. The government hasn't done enough for us."

This apathetic, youthful mass is a powerful, albeit untapped, force: Three-quarters of the population is younger than 35. They are enough to shape an election; in a truly representative system, they would decide their government.

But few young people are expected to go to the polls in next spring's presidential election. There's the stupor of hopelessness, and the boycott threat by some reformists. They say they will shun the polls if the conservatives once again ban reformist candidates from running, as they did in parliamentary elections this year.

"When I was a youth, we were revolutionaries, and we were ready to pay the price," said Hamid Reza Jalaipour, a 46-year-old sociologist and onetime student activist who now runs reformist newspapers. "These days the youth are not ready to pay. They prefer to depoliticize, and the conservatives are very happy about that. They are looking for passive masses."

Even the Islamic Republic's legendary student movements have fallen silent. It was the students who swept President Mohammad Khatami into office in 1997, heady with his promises of reform and progress. But Khatami proved weak, and the reforms never came.

So the students lost patience. But when they smashed through the streets in the massive demonstrations of 1999, they were arrested and tortured. Bit by bit, the fire faded from the campuses.

"Our language used to be more courageous," said Majid Haji Babaei, a 31-year-old doctoral student and a leader at the Student Unity Office. "But we were beaten up and even thrown out of windows, we were suppressed, and many went to jail. Naturally, some students felt disappointed, and the risk of political involvement also got higher."

Many Iranian youths yearn for a better life elsewhere but are hard-pressed to articulate where, or how. They resent their own government but complain that they have been unfairly stigmatized by the West. They speak like people drained of politics and religion.

"Everybody believes in God, but now there is a big gap between us and God," said Majid Ghanbari, a 28-year-old film buff, music enthusiast and malcontented entrepreneur with floppy hair and rumpled jeans. "The government tried to force people closer, but instead they sent us further away."

His brother nodded. "Before the revolution, we had real believers, but not now," said Hamid Ghanbari, who at 25 is exactly as old as the revolution. "After the Islamic Revolution, we don't have religion anymore."

Majid Ghanbari owns Video Home, a gaudy and improbable outlaw's den tucked into a corner of a shopping mall in the sandy urban jungles of western Tehran. Its walls are festooned with the bright covers of bootleg movies and albums. He's pushing pop hits from America alongside Iranian films. He hunches over his computer all day long, burning CD after CD.

"Anything you want, I have it," he said.

How about DJ Maryam, the mysterious singer who runs her voice through a computer so it sounds like a robot croaking, the one who is rumored to have been jailed because in Iran it is illegal for women to sing? Her identity is secret, but her albums are everywhere.

Of course the album is available, Ghanbari scoffed — "Aren't you hearing it in every taxi?" A few clicks of the mouse, the cursor dances on his flat-screen monitor and the voice spills out into the mall.

As is the case with most of his Iranian peers, Ghanbari's thoughts have been driven away from politics. He has watched with disgust in recent years as fundamentalists resurged and flexed a new, bolder power.

Just the other day, a busload of morality police raided the mall and arrested any women who weren't wearing "good hijab" — in other words, women who were showing too much hair. People in Tehran haven't seen that brand of open bullying from the fundamentalists in eight years, Ghanbari fretted. "Those girls were our customers," he said.

In these nervous times, Ghanbari finds solace in pop music and bootleg movies. "Almost everybody supports the left, but they don't have any power," he said. "When the left doesn't do anything, people just forget about it. They put their heads down."

Two schoolgirls slipped into his shop, swathed in hip-hop gear. They were looking for the latest bootleg Iranian music from Los Angeles, and they weren't disappointed. Ghanbari reached beneath his mouse pad, as if he had been waiting for them, and handed over a CD.

As the girls slumped back into the crowds, Ghanbari sighed. How long will it be, he wondered, before the police return to shutter his shop for selling illegal CDs? It happens every few months.

"And then I get nervous and feel really bad. Every time I think, 'I should do something, I should leave this country. What kind of life is this?' " he said, shaking his head. "But then they open the shop again, and I have my job, I have my life. And I am Iranian, I love Iran. I forget about it until the next time."


23 posted on 12/25/2004 10:37:47 PM PST by freedom44
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To: Swiss
Malmstrom AFB, Montana
November 7, 1975

I'm sure there is plenty of accounts on the web. I work FAA and there was a sighting last year of a UFO that came out of the water off of FL and headed NW. Jets were scrambled to locate the object. The contrail was screaming up and fast toward IN and the jet couldn't close. NORAD said they'd investigate. That was all.
24 posted on 12/25/2004 10:45:20 PM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: endthematrix
In the US there is the report that UFO's were sight at a US base (by many witnesses)...

The most famous sighting at an AF base in the 70s was at Loring AFB in 1975. Google "loring + ufo" and you'll get an eyefull.

25 posted on 12/25/2004 10:51:30 PM PST by Grut
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To: Kurt_D
"The unidentified flying objects could be satellites, comets or spying or reconnaissance craft trying to monitor Iran’s nuclear installations," Col. Mahini said.

Oh, my. I know where those comets are coming from- those are the Infamous All-Powerful All-Seeing Eyes of the Bane of Democrats, Karl Rove.

26 posted on 12/25/2004 10:58:29 PM PST by piasa (Attitude Adjustments Offered Here Free of Charge)
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To: Grut
Yeah, I find that there is plenty of useless bunk in UFO wacky land. BUT then there are people that have reputations and public professions that give them credibility, like cops, soldiers or air traffic operators. Then I sit up and take notice. I read a report of an air traffic controller that watched a UFO and talked to a pilot for an hour in Alaska.
27 posted on 12/25/2004 11:00:09 PM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
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To: freedom44
Definition of Psychological Operations:

'Psychological Operations: Planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of foreign governments, organizations, groups, and individuals. The purpose of psychological operations is to induce or reinforce foreign attitudes and behavior favorable to the originator's objectives. Also called PSYOP.


The "UFOs" are likely the work of our own forces spying and playing mind-games against the Iranians. How we do it, exactly, is obviously of great secrecy.
28 posted on 12/25/2004 11:09:47 PM PST by SteveMcKing
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To: piasa; MeekOneGOP; PhilDragoo; Happy2BMe; potlatch; ntnychik; Smartass


 Ronald Reagan's terrorist solution site 

 click on all 3 graphics below for audios 










try your fast draw here



       
29 posted on 12/25/2004 11:11:38 PM PST by devolve (http://pro.lookingat.us/ElvisChristmas.html http://pro.lookingat.us/TheKing.html)
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To: freedom44
They have been watching ufo's for years:


30 posted on 12/25/2004 11:14:31 PM PST by Critical Bill
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To: Critical Bill

Mother of God! What in the world is that?!?


31 posted on 12/25/2004 11:17:29 PM PST by freedom44
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To: freedom44

The star in the east?


32 posted on 12/25/2004 11:29:52 PM PST by taxesareforever
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To: devolve

Teran


33 posted on 12/26/2004 12:34:40 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The ( FOOL ) hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Quix; andysandmikesmom; areafiftyone; bigfootbob; Ecliptic; El Sordo; Ghengis; green team 1999; ...

FYI Pings!


34 posted on 12/26/2004 5:08:16 AM PST by Las Vegas Dave
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To: endthematrix
Yeah, I find that there is plenty of useless bunk in UFO wacky land. BUT then there are people that have reputations and public professions that give them credibility, like cops, soldiers or air traffic operators.

I've thought the same thing. There are oceans of silliness and nutjobbery in the 'field' of UFO study.

But there are, as you point out, some credible reports. And all it takes is for one story to be true, one time.

35 posted on 12/26/2004 5:50:32 AM PST by Riley
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To: freedom44

There was an article not long ago about Iran testing drones. I think that answers the UFO sightings.


36 posted on 12/26/2004 6:00:57 AM PST by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: freedom44
The sanitarium called, they want their spaceship back.
37 posted on 12/26/2004 9:21:56 AM PST by MaxMax
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To: nuconvert; DoctorZIn

Iran supplied those drones to the Hezbullah so i'm sure they've got their own.


38 posted on 12/26/2004 9:23:33 AM PST by freedom44
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To: freedom44
All anti-aircraft units and jet fighters have been ordered to shoot down the flying objects in Iran’s airspace

I suppose that means, "shoot down any and all flying objects in Iran's airspace."

39 posted on 12/26/2004 9:31:21 AM PST by mtbopfuyn
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To: All
Dear Iranian air force Chief, Catch me if you can! Shalom,


From IAF ThunderPilot

40 posted on 12/26/2004 10:32:25 AM PST by IAF ThunderPilot (The basic point of the Israel Defence Forces: -Israel cannot afford to lose a single war.)
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