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I Love Bob Dylan (Why Joseph Farah's A Fan Of the 60s Great As Much Ann Coulter Alert)
Worldnetdaily.com ^ | 12/28/04 | Joseph Farah

Posted on 12/27/2004 11:51:13 PM PST by goldstategop

just read a fascinating book – "Chronicles, Volume 1" by Bob Dylan.

There are some real surprises in this book.

Most of us baby boomers thought of Dylan as a man with a political agenda. It turns out Dylan wasn't trying to lead anyone anywhere. He just wanted to be a singer-songwriter.

It's quite a revelation, and Dylan has an interesting way of telling the story.

Dylan was a private man who tried to put his family first. He didn't want to get caught up in the '60s activism. He was conspicuously absent from Woodstock, Altamont and all the other big festivals and protests of the era.

He writes of an introduction he received at the Newport Folk Festival that made him shudder.

Ronnie Gilbert, one of the Weavers, told the audience: "And here he is ... take him, you know him, he's yours."

"I had failed to sense the ominous forebodings in that introduction," writes Dylan.

Elvis had never been introduced like that. "Take him, he's yours!" What a crazy thing to say! Screw that. As far as I knew, I didn't belong to anybody then or now. I had a wife and children whom I loved more than anything else in the world. I was trying to provide for them, keep out of trouble, but the big bugs in the press kept promoting me as a mouthpiece, spokesman, or even conscience of a generation. That was funny. All I'd ever done was sing songs that were dead straight and expressed powerful new realities. I had very little in common with and knew even less about a generation that I was supposed to be the voice of.

Dylan goes on to talk about just how estranged he was from the values of that generation while trying to live a quiet life in Woodstock, N.Y. He sensed people wanted him to lead the charge against the Roman Empire.

"But America wasn't the Roman Empire and someone else would have to step up and volunteer," he writes. "I really was never any more than what I was – a folk musician who gazed into the gray mist with tear-blinded eyes and made up songs that floated in a luminous haze. Now it had blown up in my face and was hanging over me. I wasn't a preacher performing miracles."

When Dylan and his family first moved to the quiet, rural town of Woodstock, it offered a sanctuary for them. Later, intruders started breaking in day and night.

"Tensions mounted almost immediately and peace was hard to come by," he writes.

At one time the place had been a quiet refuge, but now, no more. Roadmaps to our homestead must have been posted in all 50 states for gangs of dropouts and druggies. Moochers showed up from as far away as California on pilgrimages. Goons were breaking into our place all hours of the night. At first, it was merely the nomadic homeless making illegal entry – seemed harmless enough, but then rogue radicals looking for the Prince of Protest began to arrive – unaccountable-looking characters, gargoyle-looking gals, scarecrows, stragglers looking to party, raid the pantry.

Dylan had a few firearms, but the local police cautioned that if he used them to defend his property and family – or even fired warning shots – that it would be he who found himself in jail. He was also worried that "creeps thumping their boots across our roof could even take me to court if any of them fell off. This was so unsettling. I wanted to set fire to these people. These gate-crashers, spooks, trespassers, demagogues were all disrupting my home life."

Dylan wanted to get away. And the place he wanted to go might surprise many of his fans.

"I don't know what everybody else was fantasizing about, but what I was fantasizing about was a nine-to-five existence, a house on a tree-lined block with a white picket fence, pink roses in the backyard," he writes. "That would have been nice. That was my deepest dream."

It wasn't that Dylan was apolitical. He was just so out of step with those around him that he didn't feel like he could talk about it.

"I had a primitive way of looking at things and I liked country fair politics," he writes.

My favorite politician was Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, who reminded me of Tom Mix, and there wasn't any way to explain that to anybody. I wasn't comfortable with all the psycho polemic babble. It wasn't my particular feast of food. Even the current news made me nervous, I liked old news better. All the new news was bad.

It turns out Dylan was more iconoclastic than any of us ever realized.

His book is a great read for anyone who lived through the '60s. You'll never look at Dylan or his generation the same way again.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: 60sgreat; bobdylan; countryfolkmusic; dylan; hippie; josephfarah; woodstock
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A fascinating look at the 60s great Bob Dylan. You'll never see the singer or his generation the same way again after you've finished his autobiography. A radical he never was. And his songs are timeless.
1 posted on 12/27/2004 11:51:14 PM PST by goldstategop
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To: goldstategop

I had the priveledge of working on his CD ROM "Bob Dylan, Highway 61". At the time I started on it, I didn't like Dylan. By the time I finished, I had a great admiration for the man and his amazing song writing. He's up for a Nobel Peace Prize this year in Journalism for his songwriting. Well-deserved.


2 posted on 12/27/2004 11:56:45 PM PST by sonserae
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To: sonserae

Dylan bump!


3 posted on 12/28/2004 12:03:36 AM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: goldstategop
I learned an important lesson from reading one too many bios of my favorite writers: the less you know about an artist you revere, the better. Looking into their personal lives rarely gives you any deep insights into their creative undertakings. I've always regarded Dylan as utterly enigmatic; I'll let him stay that way.

For those of you who don't like the voice but like the songs, this can't be recommended highly enough.

4 posted on 12/28/2004 12:14:17 AM PST by Tristram Shandy
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To: Lancey Howard

Ultimate 60's war ( Vietnam ) protest song , Masters of War by Bobby Dylan :

Come you masters of war
You that build all the guns
You that build the death planes
You that build the big bombs
You that hide behind walls
You that hide behind desks
I just want you to know
I can see through your masks

You that never done nothin'
But build to destroy
You play with my world
Like it's your little toy
You put a gun in my hand
And you hide from my eyes
And you turn and run farther
When the fast bullets fly

Like Judas of old
You lie and deceive
A world war can be won
You want me to believe
But I see through your eyes
And I see through your brain
Like I see through the water
That runs down my drain

You fasten the triggers
For the others to fire
Then you set back and watch
When the death count gets higher
You hide in your mansion
As young people's blood
Flows out of their bodies
And is buried in the mud

You've thrown the worst fear
That can ever be hurled
Fear to bring children
Into the world
For threatening my baby
Unborn and unnamed
You ain't worth the blood
That runs in your veins

How much do I know
To talk out of turn
You might say that I'm young
You might say I'm unlearned
But there's one thing I know
Though I'm younger than you
Even Jesus would never
Forgive what you do

Let me ask you one question
Is your money that good
Will it buy you forgiveness
Do you think that it could
I think you will find
When your death takes its toll
All the money you made
Will never buy back your soul

And I hope that you die
And your death'll come soon
I will follow your casket
In the pale afternoon
And I'll watch while you're lowered
Down to your deathbed
And I'll stand o'er your grave
'Til I'm sure that you're dead


5 posted on 12/28/2004 12:18:25 AM PST by sushiman
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To: sushiman

'Masters of War' was not about the Vietnam War - - it was about ALL war and those who profit from it (the defense industrial complex that Eisenhower warned about in his farewell speech?). The song was included on Dylan's Freewheelin' album which was released in May 1963 (Kennedy was President!) and Vietnam was just coming onto the radar screen.


6 posted on 12/28/2004 12:39:46 AM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: 537cant be wrong; Aeronaut; bassmaner; Bella_Bru; cgk; ChadGore; Cutterjohnmhb; Churchjack; ...

Rock and Roll PING! email Weegee to get on/off this list (or grab it yourself to PING the rest)

7 posted on 12/28/2004 12:55:34 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: goldstategop

Today I went to the Dylan exhibit at the E.M.P. in Seattle. It was excellent. It covered the years 1956 to 1966. The overwhelming impression I got was of a young man who was uninhibited in his ambitions, who was in the very right place at the right time, and who was taken up by some very talented and well-connected people. It seemed to me that Zimmy went from cute, talented upstart to icon in about 18 months at age 20 or so. How could anyone have anticipated this? Of course he played along because he wanted to enjoy the wealth and the audience. But in no way did it seem that he ever conceived of himself as anything more than a singer/songwriter parcel to a well-established American tradition of such.


8 posted on 12/28/2004 2:56:31 AM PST by rogue yam
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To: sushiman

On July 1, 1978, I saw B.D. play that song at a rock festival in Nuremberg at the Zeppelinfeld, site of the infamous Nazi Party rallies held there in the 1930s. He introduced the song by saying simply "I can't believe that I'm singing this song here."


9 posted on 12/28/2004 3:01:56 AM PST by rogue yam
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To: goldstategop
 

http://bobdylan.com/performances/

 

Performances

Pancho and Lefty, { listen } Bonnaroo 2004 Music Festival, Manchester, Tennessee, 6/11/04
You Win Again, { listen } Bonnaroo 2004 Music Festival, Manchester, Tennessee, 6/11/04
Samson and Delilah, { listen } Bonnaroo 2004 Music Festival, Manchester, Tennessee, 6/11/04
Sing Me Back Home, { listen } Bonnaroo 2004 Music Festival, Manchester, Tennessee, 6/11/04

Tryin' To Get To Heaven, { listen } Warner Theatre, Washington, DC, 4/4/04
A recent performance of "Tryin' To Get To Heaven", from Time Out Of Mind.

Simple Twist Of Fate, { listen } Jerry Garcia, from the new All Good Things: Jerry Garcia Studio Sessions box set.
In addition to Jerry Garcia's five studio albums, this new 6-disc set includes over four hours of unreleased studio work. The set features covers of "Simple Twist Of Fate, "Tangled Up In Blue", and "Knockin' On Heaven's Door."
jerrygarcia.com is offering to its customers a seventh disc which includes a 16 minute version of "Visions of Johanna".


Hazel, Washington, DC, 4/2/04 { RealAudio }
An exceedingly rare performance of "Hazel,", from the 1974 album Planet Waves. Bob Dylan had only performed this song twice previously, at the taping of MTV Unplugged (though unreleased) and at The Last Waltz (recently released on the expanded box set).

Most Likely You Go Your Way and I'll Go Mine, Washington, DC, 4/2/04 { RealAudio }
From Blonde on Blonde, "Most Likely You Go Your Way and I'll Go Mine" was a highlight of the 1974 tour with The Band, documented on the live album Before the Flood..

It Ain't Me, Babe, Toronto, 3/21/04 { RealAudio }
From Bob Dylan's three-night-three-venue stand in Toronto. "It Ain't Me, Babe" first appeared on his 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan.

Down Along the Cove, St. Louis, 3/2/04 { RealAudio }
The opening number on night two of the recent engagement at the Pageant in St. Louis, "Down Along The Cove's" only official release was on Bob Dylan's 1967 album John Wesley Harding.

It's All Over Now, Baby Blue, Chicago, 3/7/04 { RealAudio }
From Bob Dylan's recent performance at The Vic, one of four venues he played in Chicago on his 2004 winter tour, "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" first appeared on his 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home.

Moonlight, Chicago, 3/7/04 { RealAudio }
A new arrangement of "Moonlight", from "Love and Theft".

Something, New York City, 11/13/02 { RealAudio }
Dedicated to George Harrison "because we were such good buddies," this performance of "Something" was the final encore performed at Bob Dylan's second show at Madison Square Garden.

You Ain't Goin' Nowhere, New York City, 11/13/02 { RealAudio }
Another Basement Tapes favorite, "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere".

Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread, New York City, 11/11/02 { RealAudio }
The first-ever live performance of "Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread", a chestnut drug out of The Basement Tapes.

The End of the Innocence, Los Angeles, California, 10/15/02 { RealAudio }
Tell Me That It Isn't True, Los Angeles, California, 10/15/02 { RealAudio }
Don Henley and Bruce Hornsby's song "The End of the Innocence" and "Tell Me That It Isn't True", originally released on Nashville Skyline.

Mutineer, Berkeley, California, 10/11/02 { RealAudio }
Floater (Too Much To Ask), Berkeley, California, 10/11/02 { RealAudio }
Warren Zevon's song "Mutineer" and "Floater", originally released on "Love and Theft".

Some recent cover versions of Bob Dylan songs:

Gates of Eden, Marc Carroll { RealAudio }
Marc Carroll is an acclaimed Irish songwriter from Dublin. This cover of Bob Dylan's "Gates of Eden" appears on Carroll's recent EP Crashpad Number. A version of "Senor (Tales of Yankee Power)" also appears on his next EP to be released in February. Both EP's and his debut album are released on the Evangeline label. Visit the Marc Carroll webpage.

Seven Days, Loup Garou { RealAudio }
Loup Garou is a New York City zydeco band of great local repute. This recording of Bob Dylan's "Seven Days" appears on the Dobb's Ferry CD, released in 2002. Find out more at Great Big Island.

You're A Big Girl Now, Mary Lee's Corvette { RealAudio }
Mary Lee's Corvette is a New York City band with several releases, the most recent of which is Blood On The Tracks, a live recording of the entire Bob Dylan album of the same name. You can find out more about the band at maryleescorvette.com

She Belongs To Me, Grateful Dead { RealAudio }
The Grateful Dead covered many Bob Dylan tunes over the course of thirty years together. Their new CD Postcards Of The Hanging is an excellent compilation of live Dead recordings of Bob Dylan songs recorded from 1973 to 1990. Track list at Amazon.com

Things Have Changed, Barb Jungr { RealAudio }
Barb Jungr is a British singer whose new album, Every Grain of Sand is a collection of Bob Dylan songs. Visit barbjungr.com and Linn Records for more information.

 

High Water (for Charley Patton), Sunrise, Florida, 2/1/02 { RealAudio }
Lonesome Day Blues, Sunrise, Florida, 2/1/02 { RealAudio }

"High Water" and "Lonesome Day Blues", originally released on "Love and Theft".

I Can't Get You Off Of My Mind, from Timeless { RealAudio }

Bob Dylan has recorded "I Can't Get You Off Of My Mind" for the newly-released album Timeless," Lost Highway Record's tribute to Hank Williams. Other artists contributing tracks include Emmy Lou Harris, Ryan Adams, Beck, Lucinda Williams, Keith Richards, Keb' Mo' and Johnny Cash.

Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum, UCSB Events Center, Santa Barbara, California, 10/14/01 { RealAudio }

"Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum", from "Love and Theft", is one of the seven new songs performed so far on Bob Dylan's current tour. Check future tour dates on the Live and In Person! page on bobdylan.com.

Standing in the Doorway, Osaka Koseinenkin Kaikan, Japan, 3/6/01 { RealAudio }

"Standing in the Doorway", from Time Out of Mind, was not performed live until June, 2000, almost three years after the album's release. This performance is from Bob Dylan's tour of Japan in early 2001.

Dusty Old Fairgrounds, Town Hall, New York, NY, 4/12/63 { RealAudio }

"Dusty Old Fairgrounds" is a Bob Dylan composition for which there are no known official releases or known studio recordings. This recording is from his 1963 Town Hall concert and was originally intended for release on the never-issued Bob Dylan In Concert album.

This World Can't Stand Long, performed by Johnnie & Jack, recorded 1947, composed by Johnnie Wright, Jim Anglin and Jack Anglin { RealAudio }
Humming Bird, performed by Johnnie & Jack, recorded 1951, composed by Johnnie Wright, Jim Anglin and Jack Anglin { RealAudio }

For the past couple of years, Bob Dylan has been performing songs originally recorded by Johnnie & Jack. Here are two of those original recordings.

Ring Them Bells, The Supper Club, New York, NY, 11/16/93 (early show) { RealAudio }

"Ring Them Bells" was originally released on Oh Mercy

High Water Everywhere, part 1, Charley Patton { RealAudio }

A recording from 1929 or 1930, Charley Patton's work was an inspiration for Bob Dylan's new song on "Love and Theft", "High Water (for Charley Patton)". Though, as you'll hear, the lyrics are a bit hard to make out, there is a valiant effort at transcription at Harry's Blues Lyrics Online. Biographical notes on Charley Patton can be found at The Blue Flame Cafe. This recording can be found on Revenant Record's staggering 7 CD set, "Screamin' and Hollerin' The Blues: The World of Charley Patton", due to be released in October, and on Yazoo Records' Charlie Patton: Founder of the Delta Blues, 1929-34

Poor Lazarus, "Minneapolis Hotel Tape", Minneapolis, MN, 12/22/61 { RealAudio }

From the legendary recording in Bonnie Beecher's apartment back in 1961.

Dink's Song, "Minneapolis Hotel Tape", Minneapolis, MN, 12/22/61 { RealAudio }

Another song recorded that same night.



10 posted on 12/28/2004 3:07:21 AM PST by dennisw (G_D: Against Amelek for all generations.)
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To: goldstategop

Actually, in his own way Dylan was far more radical than the self-styled posers of the time, because he truly was his own man, or tried to be. I think he also had a conversion to Christianity in the Seventies.


11 posted on 12/28/2004 3:08:58 AM PST by WestVirginiaRebel ("Nature abhors a moron."-H.L. Mencken)
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To: WestVirginiaRebel

Yep. He converted to fundamentalist Christianity at one point, I think. It speaks to his quintessentially conservative leanings. No other singer has taken that step.


12 posted on 12/28/2004 3:16:38 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: weegee

Ping-list me please? Thanks -- B A


13 posted on 12/28/2004 4:45:29 AM PST by Brian Allen (For there is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord -- Luke 2:11)
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To: dennisw

#10 - Wow. Thanks -- B A


14 posted on 12/28/2004 4:53:19 AM PST by Brian Allen (For there is born to you this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord -- Luke 2:11)
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To: goldstategop
I Love Bob Dylan (Why Joseph Farah's A Fan Of the 60s Great As Much Ann Coulter Alert)

Bob's cool. But I love Ann Coulter.

15 posted on 12/28/2004 4:53:27 AM PST by the invisib1e hand (Leftists Are Losers.)
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To: sushiman
Not only was "Masters of War" written at least two years before American troops saw any action at all in Vietnam, but Dylan's folk/protest period of his career lasted exactly that same period of time -- two years. That's two years out of more than forty. But for some strange reason that's the era many people want to remember him by. .....his weakest.
16 posted on 12/28/2004 5:31:51 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: Tristram Shandy
I learned an important lesson from reading one too many bios of my favorite writers: the less you know about an artist you revere, the better. Looking into their personal lives rarely gives you any deep insights into their creative undertakings. I've always regarded Dylan as utterly enigmatic; I'll let him stay that way.

Very wise. ....concur completely.

17 posted on 12/28/2004 5:34:28 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: goldstategop
Dylan had a few firearms, but the local police cautioned that if he used them to defend his property and family – or even fired warning shots – that it would be he who found himself in jail. He was also worried that "creeps thumping their boots across our roof could even take me to court if any of them fell off. This was so unsettling. I wanted to set fire to these people. These gate-crashers, spooks, trespassers, demagogues were all disrupting my home life."

He got a few English Mastiffs to help deal with the problem when he lived in Pt. Dume (Malibu), but the fact that he was told he couldn't defend his life and property without being considered a criminal himself is just outrageous. ......but typical, considering his state of residence.

18 posted on 12/28/2004 5:40:13 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: goldstategop
My favorite politician was Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, who reminded me of Tom Mix, and there wasn't any way to explain that to anybody

lol.....can you imagine Dylan attempting to explain to his folky friends that he supported Goldwater?. They might've killed him right then and there.

19 posted on 12/28/2004 5:42:28 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: Mr. Mojo

I was only a punk kid of 10 in 1962 ...Found out about Dylan a few years later ...Despite Dylan's reluctance to directly speak out against the Vietnam War in public , he was , and still is to a great extent , associated with anti-war songs . Add in the fact that he was tight with people like Joan Baez ( they lived together for a while ) and Allen Ginsberg ( no America lover ) , and it is easy form misconceptions of the man . Anyway , I appreciate your setting me straight .


20 posted on 12/28/2004 6:02:54 AM PST by sushiman
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To: goldstategop

He was no fundamentalist, that is for sure.


21 posted on 12/28/2004 6:14:15 AM PST by RaceBannon (Jesus: Born of the Jews, through the Jews, for the sins of the World!)
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To: sushiman

the press kept promoting me as a mouthpiece, spokesman, or even conscience of a generation. That was funny. All I'd ever done was sing songs that were dead straight and expressed powerful new realities. I had very little in common with and knew even less about a generation that I was supposed to be the voice of.

I find this hard to believe. Are we talking about the same Bob Dylan? Not really, he is forty years older now and he sees things differently. But, I still remember.


22 posted on 12/28/2004 6:23:25 AM PST by oldbrowser (You lost the election.....................Get over it.)
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To: RaceBannon
He was no fundamentalist, that is for sure.

I believe you are wrong about that.

23 posted on 12/28/2004 6:25:09 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
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To: goldstategop; dennisw

Interesting, thanks; Thanks!


24 posted on 12/28/2004 6:29:30 AM PST by PGalt
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To: goldstategop

Very interesting article. I know that GA Jimmy also tried to ride the Bob Dylan popularity in the political sphere.


25 posted on 12/28/2004 6:30:22 AM PST by Theodore R.
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To: sonserae

"He's up for a Nobel Peace Prize this year in Journalism for his songwriting"



It was for a Nobel Prize in Literature (there's no Nobel Prize for Journalism), but unfortunately he didn't win. He's been nominated before, and will probably be nominated every year until he wins it or he dies.


26 posted on 12/28/2004 7:00:37 AM PST by AuH2ORepublican (Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice, moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.)
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To: goldstategop
My favorite politician was Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, who reminded me of Tom Mix, and there wasn't any way to explain that to anybody.

If he did he wouldn't have had people all over his roof.

27 posted on 12/28/2004 7:07:34 AM PST by Semper Paratus
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To: oldbrowser

I don't know what you remember but what I remember is the attempts of every Leftist to claim Dylan as a fellow traveler and his determined silence outside his songs. Many a anti-war rally advertised his upcoming presence and every one was disappointed when he never showed.

His early songs were of a social protest nature generally associated with Leftism but which also appealed to those who just had a concern about Justice and Injustice eminently American concerns.


28 posted on 12/28/2004 7:10:55 AM PST by justshutupandtakeit (Public Enemy #1, the RATmedia.)
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To: ActionNewsBill

Then you dont know what a Fundamentalist is.

Welcome to the online home of The Fundamentals. This site will eventually contain all four volumes of The Fundamentals: A Testimony to the Truth, published by Baker Books. The site is intended to serve as a resource for and defense of essential Christian doctrine, as was intended by those men who authored The Fundamentals and those who funded the work.
http://www.xmission.com/~fidelis/index.html


29 posted on 12/28/2004 7:11:22 AM PST by RaceBannon (Jesus: Born of the Jews, through the Jews, for the sins of the World!)
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To: goldstategop

I thought him to be a radical. I am a child of the 60's. Couldn't stand his voice. did enjoy many of his songs (or poems). Maybe I'll take a look at it. Thanks.


30 posted on 12/28/2004 7:12:50 AM PST by bedolido (I can forgive you for killing my sons, but I cannot forgive you for forcing me to kill your sons)
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To: Lancey Howard

Now that is quick information. He converted to Christianity I believe in the late 50s early 60s and the references and allusions start to make a heavy presence.


31 posted on 12/28/2004 7:20:00 AM PST by xcullen (DC Conservative)
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To: RaceBannon
The spiritual journey of Bob Dylan(Rutherford Institute)

Here's an excerpt.

For those hoping that Dylan’s fanaticism was only a one-shot deal, Saved was proof that his convictions were real. "By His grace I have been touched, by His word I have been healed, by His hand I've been delivered, by His spirit I've been sealed" went the title song and the rest of the album followed suit.

While it contained a few of Dylan’s best "gospel" songs—"Solid Rock" and "In the Garden" stand beside any of his best—the album seemed uninspired.

His next album Shot of Love contained songs that were not explicitly Christian—although most were along the lines of "Property of Jesus" and "Every Grain of Sand"—and by Infidels in 1983, with only one song, "Man of Peace," directly religious in content, the rumors began to fly. A New York magazine headline read, "Dylan Ditching Gospel?"

Today, the general opinion is that Dylan flirted with Christianity the same as he did with amphetamines or country music in the ‘60s, abandoning them for whatever his next phase was.

But in Restless Pilgrim (Relevant Books), Marshall argues that Dylan has maintained his Christian beliefs. "I think he’s mellowed, but it’s a reasonable conclusion that Dylan has maintained his faith in Jesus, as expressed through his songs," says Marshall. "I don’t think I’m projecting my personal beliefs on Dylan, because I listened to Dylan before I was Christian, and I didn’t even listen to those records, I guess because I thought they were too religious, maybe. And once I had my experience, I was curious as to what happened to Dylan, and when I heard those songs, I was like, ‘Whoa!’ I knew something had happened to him when I heard those songs, they were right to the heart."

32 posted on 12/28/2004 7:40:54 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
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To: justshutupandtakeit

Dylan is one of my favorite songwriters. As you said, His early songs were of a social protest nature generally associated with Leftism. He may say that he was doing what good writers do, reflecting the mood of the times, which he was. As a matter of fact, he was doing it so well and even seeing what the rest of us could not see yet, that sure looks like leadership to us uncomplicated types.


33 posted on 12/28/2004 7:41:27 AM PST by oldbrowser (You lost the election.....................Get over it.)
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To: sushiman

Masters of war mp3 file:

http://praxeology.net/mastersofwar2.mp3


34 posted on 12/28/2004 7:48:54 AM PST by society-by-contract
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To: AuH2ORepublican

oops...sorry! My mistake.


35 posted on 12/28/2004 9:03:28 AM PST by sonserae
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To: Mr. Mojo
...but the fact that he was told he couldn't defend his life and property without being considered a criminal himself is just outrageous. ......but typical, considering his state of residence.

Perhaps he should have written a song about this in protest.

36 posted on 12/28/2004 9:27:41 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: Theodore R.; RaceBannon

Now Jimmy Carter was one politician who was not harassed for talking about being Christian...


37 posted on 12/28/2004 9:30:26 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: justshutupandtakeit

The left have tried time and time again to annoint a Pied Piper to bring people over to their side. Why is it any surprise that they tried to co-opt the songs of Bob Dylan when they co-opted Rock and Roll and have rewritten the history of punk rock to say that IT TOO was political; if anything punk was a response against hippie/liberal political correctness.


38 posted on 12/28/2004 9:34:13 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: goldstategop

www.rightwingbob.com


39 posted on 12/28/2004 9:53:23 AM PST by don-o (Stop Freeploading. Do the right thing and become a Monthly Donor.)
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To: weegee
Now Jimmy Carter was one politician who was not harassed for talking about being Christian...

Democrat Presidents that regularly attend church and invoke God in their speeches do so completely unmolested by the left, while Presidents that do exactly the same thing get crucified. I mentioned this to a lefty friend of mine who responded "that's because we know that the Democrat Presidents don't mean it."

40 posted on 12/28/2004 10:06:29 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: weegee
Perhaps he should have written a song about this in protest.

No doubt. I'd love to ask him why he didn't.

41 posted on 12/28/2004 10:07:42 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: weegee

Perhaps he should have written a song about this in protest.


"What Was it You Wanted?" fits.


42 posted on 12/28/2004 10:15:00 AM PST by don-o (Stop Freeploading. Do the right thing and become a Monthly Donor.)
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To: Mr. Mojo

Jimmy Carter did mean it and has authored several books on faith. That is unless he's trying to hijack Christianity...


43 posted on 12/28/2004 10:15:03 AM PST by weegee (WE FOUGHT ZOGBYISM November 2, 2004 - 60 Million Voters versus 60 Minutes - BUSH WINS!!!)
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To: weegee
Perhaps he should have written a song about this in protest.

This has always been one of my favorite Dylan tunes.

Maybe his inspiration for it was more than just Israel?

Neighborhood Bully

Well, the neighborhood bully, he's just one man
His enemies say he's on their land
They got him outnumbered about a million to one
He got no place to escape to, no place to run
He's the neighborhood bully.

The neighborhood bully he just lives to survive
He's criticized and condemned for being alive
He's not supposed to fight back, he's supposed to have thick skin
He's supposed to lay down and die when his door is kicked in
He's the neighborhood bully.

The neighborhood bully been driven out of every land
He's wandered the earth an exiled man
Seen his family scattered, his people hounded and torn
He's always on trial for just being born
He's the neighborhood bully.

Well, he knocked out a lynch mob, he was criticized
Old women condemned him, said he could apologize
Then he destroyed a bomb factory, nobody was glad
The bombs were meant for him.
He was supposed to feel bad
He's the neighborhood bully.

Well, the chances are against it, and the odds are slim
That he'll live by the rules that the world makes for him
'Cause there's a noose at his neck and a gun at his back
And a license to kill him is given out to every maniac
He's the neighborhood bully.

Well, he got no allies to really speak of
What he gets he must pay for, he don't get it out of love
He buys obsolete weapons and he won't be denied
But no one sends flesh and blood to fight by his side
He's the neighborhood bully.

Well, he's surrounded by pacifists who all want peace
They pray for it nightly that the bloodshed must cease
Now, they wouldn't hurt a fly.
To hurt one they would weep
They lay and they wait for this bully to fall asleep He's the neighborhood bully.

Every empire that's enslaved him is gone
Egypt and Rome, even the great Babylon
He's made a garden of paradise in the desert sand
In bed with nobody, under no one's command
He's the neighborhood bully.

Now his holiest books have been trampled upon
No contract that he signed was worth that what it was written on
He took the crumbs of the world and he turned it into wealth
Took sickness and disease and he turned it into health
He's the neighborhood bully.

What's anybody indebted to him for ?
Nothing, they say. He just likes to cause war
Pride and prejudice and superstition indeed
They wait for this bully like a dog waits to feed
He's the neighborhood bully.

What has he done to wear so many scars ?
Does he change the course of rivers ?
Does he pollute the moon and stars ?
Neighborhood bully, standing on the hill
Running out the clock, time standing still
Neighborhood bully.

44 posted on 12/28/2004 10:15:27 AM PST by Freebird Forever (HAPPY GNU YEAR !!!)
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To: weegee

And the Clash was some sort of gun rights' activists after a run-in with the police.


45 posted on 12/28/2004 10:15:49 AM PST by justshutupandtakeit (Public Enemy #1, the RATmedia.)
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To: xcullen
He converted to Christianity I believe in the late 50s early 60s

In 1978, actually. His first "gospel" album was Slow Train Coming, released the following year.

46 posted on 12/28/2004 10:16:25 AM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: Mr. Mojo

Thanks - when was All Along the Watchtower written - it seemed to be pretty thick with Christian imagery?


47 posted on 12/28/2004 2:16:26 PM PST by xcullen (DC Conservative)
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To: xcullen
'67/'68. .....way before his conversion. Biblical imagery has been a theme in Dylan's music throughout his career. .....although on some albums more than others. John Wesley Harding (which contains "All Along the Watchtower") is loaded with it. .....a great album, too.
48 posted on 12/28/2004 4:24:21 PM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: Mr. Mojo

Bump this for the evening shift


49 posted on 12/28/2004 5:09:07 PM PST by don-o (Stop Freeploading. Do the right thing and become a Monthly Donor.)
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To: ActionNewsBill

Restless Pilgrim bump!


50 posted on 01/09/2005 7:15:03 PM PST by Tweeker
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