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Since I love Gen. Washington, this war is special to me. It also set up the RevWar in a number of ways.
1 posted on 01/01/2005 6:44:13 AM PST by Pharmboy
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To: Pharmboy
Is this where I say : "It's Bush's fault!"?

Thanks for the post. I love these historical threads.

2 posted on 01/01/2005 6:45:57 AM PST by Caipirabob (Democrats.. Socialists..Commies..Traitors...Who can tell the difference?)
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To: Pharmboy

I am all for the celebration of the French and Indian War of the 1760s so long as we don't have to get the French involved in the affair.


3 posted on 01/01/2005 6:49:26 AM PST by wmileo
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To: Pharmboy

Great post; I've always enjoyed history. The French & Indian War is little known even in the upstate NY, Ohio Valley & Great Lakes areas where it was fought; Washington's role was probably more central to this conflict than anyone else of his age--and that in turn gave him the military knowledge and leadership experience he used to bring victory in the Revolutionary War.


4 posted on 01/01/2005 7:04:10 AM PST by mark502inf
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To: Pharmboy
There was a thread a while ago talking about how the French were our First Enemy...

Was this war called St. Catherine's War in France?
5 posted on 01/01/2005 7:09:08 AM PST by Mark was here (My tag line was about to be censored.)
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To: Pharmboy
Chapman Historical Museum A painting that was commissioned by the Glens Falls Insurance Company in the early 20th century is titled the "Surrender of Fort William Henry, Lake George, N.Y. 1757."

My hometown. On Free Republic! What a way to start the new year! This is a great museum by the way.

6 posted on 01/01/2005 7:09:21 AM PST by andyandval
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To: Pharmboy

When I was in high school we watched "The Last of the Mohicans" in history class and that was about all we were taught about that war.


9 posted on 01/01/2005 7:17:59 AM PST by mainepatsfan
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To: Pharmboy
No, It Wasn't French vs. Indians

Typical Times, assuming that its readership is stupid.

11 posted on 01/01/2005 7:26:41 AM PST by Rodney King (No, we can't all just get along.)
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To: Pharmboy
"I fortunately escaped without any wound, for the right wing, where I stood, was exposed to and received all the enemy's fire, and it was the part where the man was killed, and the rest wounded. I heard the bullets whistle, and, believe me there is something charming in the sound."

G. Washington --- 1754 (On the skirmish against the French & Indians at Jumonville Glenn that started the war.)

The first of many times over the next 30 years when he would be under fire, yet never wounded.

13 posted on 01/01/2005 7:31:44 AM PST by Ditto ( No trees were killed in sending this message, but billions of electrons were inconvenienced.)
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To: Pharmboy

That's because in this war, Indians carried away captured white people and sold them as slaves to the French Priests in Canada.

The Indians were slaughtering towns up and down the Hudson and inside Massachusetts, too.


http://www.gospelcom.net/chi/DAILYF/2002/11/daily-11-21-2002.shtml


November 21, 1706 • John Williams, The Redeemed Captive, Returned
Indians return English captives in an unrelated incident.
Dawn was still two hours away on the morning of February 29, 1704. Inside the fence at Deerfield, Massachusetts, 291 people slept fearlessly. Expecting no trouble on such a cold, quiet night, the settlers had posted no night watch.

But, creeping quietly through three feet of hardened snow, a party of over 300 French and Indian fighters approached the town. Probably they noted with satisfaction the snow drifts that had piled high against the little town's palisade. They swarmed over the protecting fence and into the houses.

John Williams and his wife Eunice woke to find twenty painted warriors howling around their bed. Newly arrived to Deerfield as its first pastor, John was the most prominent person in the town. Indians tied him with ropes. Before his horrified eyes they tomahawked his six year old son, a six week old daughter and a black servant.

For three hours, the French and Indians looted the town. They set fire to its houses and barns. When men from neighboring towns came to Deerfield's defense, the enemy battled them. Finally, they disappeared into the snowy wilderness with 109 captives, leaving 56 settlers dead. Wading through three feet of snow, the raiding party headed North on a seven week trek to Montreal, Canada.

On the second day, John saw that his wife could not hold up. She was still weak from her last pregnancy. Knowing that the raiders would spare no one who was unable to keep up the pace, John said good-bye to her. Soon afterward, she stumbled while wading a small river and "was plunged over head and ears in the water; after which she traveled not far, for the cruel and bloodthirsty savage slew her with his hatchet."

Why had a Puritan pastor in a remote outpost been targeted for this bitter destiny? For one thing, Boston authorities held a Canadian "pirate" named Jean-Baptiste Guyon. The Canadians wanted this naval officer back, and thought a hostage exchange might force the negotiations along. For another, their Indian allies were concerned at the numbers of colonists moving westward and demanded that something be done to slow the land grab.

Although his own feet were so raw that he had to wring blood out of his socks each night, John did all he could to keep up the spirits of the other captives. Sixty of them were eventually released. John was one of the last. He returned to a hero's welcome in Massachusetts on this day, November 21, 1706. Shortly afterward, he wrote a bestseller The Redeemed Captive Returning to Zion.

The book was half heroism and half complaint. His main gripe, apart from the brutal attack itself, was that the French attempted to force their Protestant captives to convert to Catholicism. In its other details, the book remains an important source of information on colonial life.

John Williams died on June 12, 1729. One of his daughters, Eunice, would not be there to bury him. Captured with him, she never returned home, but married an Indian.


14 posted on 01/01/2005 7:40:39 AM PST by RaceBannon (Jesus: Born of the Jews, through the Jews, for the sins of the World!)
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To: Pharmboy

They've done a wonderful job with the restoration of Fort Ticonderoga. It's well worth a visit.


16 posted on 01/01/2005 7:44:21 AM PST by mewzilla
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To: Pharmboy

I love history and really enjoyed this post. This war really did shape the future of America and should be remembered. The British ended up in control of much of North America after this war. I don't think North America would of ever of amounted to anything if the British had lost. The French were a tough enemy at that time in their history and victory was never certain. It was perhaps their reliance on Indian allies that did the French in, since while fierce, they were not disciplined and trained troops. The experience that it gave the colonials was essential to our success in the revolutionary war.


17 posted on 01/01/2005 7:47:37 AM PST by dog breath
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To: Pharmboy
...the English thought of them as dirty savages and treated them terribly."

How else would you regard treacherous stone age aborigines who engaged in terroristic murder, torture and cannibalism and who were in fact physically dirty?


18 posted on 01/01/2005 7:55:11 AM PST by nathanbedford
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To: Pharmboy

Link to a powerpoint on the French and Indian war: http://staff.fcps.net/pnewton/ppt/The%20French%20and%20Indian%20War-ALL.ppt#280,25,Treaty of Paris 1763

Ohio history central: http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/ohc/history/h_indian/events/index.shtml

It depends on where you live in Ohio as to whether you know much about this war or not, or about the Ohio Indian wars, etc. With river and place names like Kanawha, Chillicothe, Mohawk, Delaware, Wyandot, etc., the area is filled with reminders of this area's heritage. Add to the mix the pre-historic mounds, and the Shakers, Moravians, Mennonites, Amish, Quakers and so forth, and you have quite a spicy history. Iriquois came from New York to gather Flint, too. However, it is too bad the Logan Elm really is now gone, even if Chief Pontiac has a statue to him farther north. Tecumseh is remembered every summer, though, in the play..........


20 posted on 01/01/2005 8:09:37 AM PST by combat_boots (Dug in and not budging an inch.)
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To: Chad Fairbanks

ping


23 posted on 01/01/2005 8:15:33 AM PST by DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet (Governor Rossi was robbed.)
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To: Pharmboy

The French, America's oldest enemy.


25 posted on 01/01/2005 8:18:20 AM PST by NeoCaveman (I care, just not very much.)
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To: Pharmboy
As a loyal supporter of John Kerry, no matter what terrible crimes he has committed against his country, I must protest any article that mentions Fort Ticonderoga. Each such mention is simply an effort by normal Americans to connect the traitor Benedict Arnold and the traitor John Kerry.

The MSM will not stand for this and neither should we. Sure, both Kerry and Arnold were good Americans until both betrayted their country and went over to the other side. It is unfair to subtly raise the comparison and hihlight Kerry's treason every tme Fort Ticonderoga is mentioned.

27 posted on 01/01/2005 8:31:16 AM PST by Tacis (Democrats! - When You Need America Blamed Or A Pool Peeed In!!)
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To: Pharmboy
I'm a Civil War reenactor, but have always wanted to get involved in F&I reenacting because my ancestors were in that war. In 1757 one of my more nefarious and colorful ancestors was delegated by the young Washington to build a fort on the frontier of Virginia, and did so under constant hail of Indian arrows. The fort still stands today, in modified form, and a little village has grown up around it.

The difficulty with F&I reenacting is that there are so few reenactors at any battle that they can hardly hold more than a modest skirmish. It's not like the Civil War reenactors who can sometimes put 30,000 men and 125 guns in the field.

32 posted on 01/01/2005 8:38:25 AM PST by Capriole (the Luddite hypocritically clicking away on her computer)
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To: Pharmboy
The main problem probably is that teaching the wars that France has been in and lost gets redundant
36 posted on 01/01/2005 8:41:52 AM PST by In veno, veritas
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To: Pharmboy

BTTT


43 posted on 01/01/2005 8:52:25 AM PST by Fiddlstix (This Tagline for sale. (Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Pharmboy
The war continued in Europe, Africa and Asia until 1763, when the Treaty of Paris formally concluded hostilities. France lost all of its colonies in North America to the English, except for two coastal islands.

Really? Then I guess the Louisiana Purchase never happened.

53 posted on 01/01/2005 9:09:41 AM PST by Labyrinthos
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