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Vanity question about the Civil War
none/FreeRepublic ^ | today | nobody

Posted on 01/02/2005 5:51:43 PM PST by JOHN ADAMS

At our Sabbath eve dinner table Friday night I was attempting to describe to our lovely (liberal) theater person guest the Civil War battle in which, as I recall it, they stopped the fighting for a brief period so they could evacuate the wounded from the field, then resumed. But I couldn't remember the name of the battle. Unless I've made this up, I know somebody on this board will know off the top of his head which battle it was. If said person would enlighten me, I'd be most grateful.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: civilwar; dixielist
Thanks.
1 posted on 01/02/2005 5:51:43 PM PST by JOHN ADAMS
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To: JOHN ADAMS

I would almost bet that they did that alot during the Civil War.


2 posted on 01/02/2005 5:52:45 PM PST by zzen01
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To: JOHN ADAMS

I dont know much about the civil war but you probably made it up. I do that all the time.


3 posted on 01/02/2005 5:53:23 PM PST by Graybeard58 (Remember and pray for Spec.4 Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: JOHN ADAMS

probably every battle, at least in the beginnning...


4 posted on 01/02/2005 5:53:39 PM PST by chudogg (www.chudogg.blogspot.com)
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To: JOHN ADAMS
Do you mean this?
5 posted on 01/02/2005 5:54:51 PM PST by TomServo ("Pretend you’re a Picasso! Move your nose to the back of your head!")
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To: JOHN ADAMS
There were even several occasions when it happened during WWI.

So9

6 posted on 01/02/2005 5:55:13 PM PST by Servant of the 9 (Trust Me)
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To: JOHN ADAMS

dixie list ping


7 posted on 01/02/2005 5:55:15 PM PST by Coleus (Let us pray for the 125,000 + victims of the tsunami and the 126,000 aborted Children killed daily)
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To: zzen01; JOHN ADAMS

Yes, it appears to be a frequent occurance. I have letters from my gr,gr,grandfather who was a Col. in the Civil War. He writes of once when they all got together-rebs and union-and had dinner, If I recall it may have been Christmas.


8 posted on 01/02/2005 5:55:21 PM PST by JustAnotherSavage ("As frightening as terrorism is, it's the weapon of losers." P.J. O'Rourke)
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To: JOHN ADAMS

I believe it may have been Antietam.

http://www.civilwarhome.com/antietam.htm


9 posted on 01/02/2005 5:55:29 PM PST by WoodstockCat (W2 !!! Four more Years!!)
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To: zzen01

I know for a FACT that there was a truce during WW I during Christmas 1914.


10 posted on 01/02/2005 5:57:33 PM PST by zzen01
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To: JOHN ADAMS

Also Fredericksburg.


11 posted on 01/02/2005 5:57:40 PM PST by Tax-chick (To turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just.)
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To: JOHN ADAMS
At the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain a fire broke out between the battle lines and many Union soldiers, unable to move, were being burned alive.

"Watching in horror from the Confederate entrenchments, Lieutenant Colonel William H. Martin, commander of the 1st and 15th Arkansas, ordered his regiment to cease firing. He tied his handkerchief to a ramrod and jumped onto the parapet to offer a truce: 'Come and remove your wounded; they are burning to death,' Martin shouted to the Federals. 'We won't fire a gun until you get them away. Be quick'" (Bailey, 1985, p. 71). While the rest of the line was ablaze, a "merciful quiet" rested upon this portion of the line. The men, both from North and South, emerged from their lines to work together in carrying the wounded Federals to safety. After the wounded were taken behind Union lines, A Union major presented Martin with two colt revolvers as a token of appreciation. Soon, the two lines once again opened fire in their savagery. Martin was mortally wounded in the ensuing combat.

I am proud to say that William H. Martin is associated with my state.

At the Battle of Fredricksburg, a Confederate private ventured into no-mans land to take canteens to wounded Union soldiers at great risk. A statue of him is on the battlefield today.

This sort of thing occurred several times and certainly not just on the Confederate side.
12 posted on 01/02/2005 5:58:46 PM PST by Arkinsaw
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To: TomServo

I hadn't known about Mr. Kirkland, so it's not what I was thinking of, but I'm glad to learn about him. Thank you.


13 posted on 01/02/2005 6:00:11 PM PST by JOHN ADAMS
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To: JOHN ADAMS

Cold Harbor.


14 posted on 01/02/2005 6:00:27 PM PST by Rebelbase (Who is General Chat?)
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To: JOHN ADAMS

It happened a lot, but you might be thinking of Fredericksberg.

Why?

Because during the cease-fire Union photographers took the opportunity to take pictures of the Confederate forces on the other side of the river. Because Civil War era photography required long exposures, they could not take "action" shots. In battle it was suicide to take photos of the fight. (There were a few -- but most were unintentional.)

The Frederickberg photos were some of the few photos of the enemy taken during the war (either by Union people of Confederates or by Confederates of Union troops or ships) and it got a lot of play in the press. Thus, it was the best-known cease fire.


15 posted on 01/02/2005 6:02:55 PM PST by No Truce With Kings (The opinions expressed are mine! Mine! MINE! All Mine!)
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To: Arkinsaw; cardinal4

One William H. Martin trumps one William J. Clinton.


16 posted on 01/02/2005 6:09:09 PM PST by Ax (Basking in the glory of President Bush's famous victory...)
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To: Ax
One William H. Martin trumps one William J. Clinton.

Forrest Gump trumps Slick Willy.

17 posted on 01/02/2005 6:13:28 PM PST by Graybeard58 (Remember and pray for Spec.4 Matt Maupin - MIA/POW- Iraq since 04/09/04)
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To: Servant of the 9

Even during WWII in the ETO, particularly and oddly, the savage fighting in the Huertegen Forest.


18 posted on 01/02/2005 6:38:58 PM PST by DMZFrank
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To: JOHN ADAMS

I am not sure about truces...but when the Confederates called for a truce at Vicksburg, Grant refused....allowing his own men to die in the hot Sun rather than allow a break in the assult.

That was why Grant won. He was willing to pay the butcher's bill in battle. Few of the Union's Generals were.


19 posted on 01/02/2005 6:39:24 PM PST by Conan the Librarian (The Best in Life is to crush my enemies, see them driven before me, and the Dewey Decimal System)
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To: Arkinsaw
This sort of thing occurred several times and certainly not just on the Confederate side.

That must be why we call it the "civil" war.

20 posted on 01/02/2005 6:42:10 PM PST by Mr Ramsbotham (Laws against sodomy are honored in the breech.)
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To: Arkinsaw

Great bit of history. Thanks for posting that.


21 posted on 01/02/2005 7:00:10 PM PST by Sabatier
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To: JOHN ADAMS
As already posted this did happen quite often during the Civil War. But the only one I can think of that hasn't already been mentioned (without referring to Shelby Foote) is the battle of Val Verde in New Mexico. The Southern forces had won the battle and controlled the battle field. The sides agreed end hostilities for each side to tend and collect their wounded. The terms of the agreement were that the Union forces could not recover any weapons from the field. The Southern forces were disturbed to learn, after the fact, that several cannon and a southern regiment battle flag were removed from the field. Another interesting fact about this battle is that Kit Carson (famous explorer and mountain man) was a regiment commander on the Union side.
22 posted on 01/02/2005 8:34:56 PM PST by bosco24
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To: Conan the Librarian

Yes, the southern soldiers belived in compassion. Grant and Sherman believed in rape, plunder, and pillage.


23 posted on 01/02/2005 9:49:21 PM PST by DixieOklahoma (Alabama - in 2006 vote ROY MOORE governor! - don't let us down!)
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To: Conan the Librarian

Sherman even believed in owning slaves!


24 posted on 01/02/2005 9:49:47 PM PST by DixieOklahoma (Alabama - in 2006 vote ROY MOORE governor! - don't let us down!)
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Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

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