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U.S. Diet Guide Puts Emphasis on Weight Loss
NY Times ^ | January 13, 2005 | MARIAN BURROS

Posted on 01/13/2005 1:49:26 PM PST by neverdem

WASHINGTON Jan. 12 - The federal government issued new dietary guidelines for Americans on Wednesday, and for the first time since the recommendations were introduced in 1980, they emphasize weight loss as well as healthy eating and cardiovascular health.

The guidelines, which follow several years of reports that Americans are fatter than ever, recommend eating many more fruits and vegetables, more low-fat milk, more whole grains and increasing exercise to as much as an hour and a half a day. But some critics question whether they will make any difference in an increasingly fat America.

In announcing the guidelines Wednesday, Ann M. Veneman, the agriculture secretary, and Tommy Thompson, the secretary of health and human services, sounded more like diet gurus than cabinet members. Ms. Veneman said that Americans spent $42 billion a year on diet and health books, indicating the nation's desire to slim down. Mr. Thompson characterized the guidelines as the government's version of a diet book.

"Tonight eat only half the dessert," Mr. Thompson said. "And then go out and walk around the block. And if you are going to watch television get down and do 10 push-ups and 5 sit-ups."

The food industry has already begun to offer more products with whole grains, fewer calories and smaller sizes.

Even critics of government nutrition policies applauded many of the changes, including recommendations that Americans eat less added sugars and less trans fats. But some said they were disappointed that no limits were set for the amount of those substances people should eat.

For example, the guidelines recommend that consumers limit trans fat, partly hydrogenated vegetable oils that have been found to be worse for the body than even saturated fat. But while the advisory committee report that was the basis for guidelines capped intake of trans fat at 1 percent of total calories, that limit was not included in the recommendations.

That was a clear victory for food manufacturers who rely on hydrogenated oils for a variety of processed foods, and who lobbied against the numeric limit. While many companies are eliminating trans fats from their products, the Agriculture Department has estimated that they are in 40 percent of processed foods.

The guidelines were a matter of intense lobbying by industry and advocacy groups over the past year.

The advisory committee, which recommended more dairy products, cited a report, partly financed by the dairy industry, that found that low-fat dairy products helped people lose weight.

After lobbying by the sugar industry, the Department of Health and Human Services helped persuade the World Health Organization in 2003 to eliminate a recommendation that sugar account for no more than 10 percent of calories.

But the final recommendation on sugar in the guidelines is actually a bit stronger than the one in the advisory committee report, which said only to choose carbohydrates wisely. The new guidelines say people should consume foods and beverages with little added sugars.

Dr. Richard Adamson, the vice president of scientific and technical affairs for the American Beverage Association, a trade group, said in an interview Wednesday that there was no proof that people gained weight because they consumed added sugar or lost weight when they cut back. Dr. Adamson said he objected to the guidelines' assertion that studies indicated that beverages with sugar and other caloric sweeteners made people gain weight.

But Dr. Kelly Brownell, director of the Yale Center for Eating and Weight Disorders and a prominent food industry critic, said that over all, he was pleased. "These guidelines are a clear step ahead of where previous ones were," Dr. Brownell said. "The issues on weight control are more specific than in the past, specifically with exercise and the suggestions on limiting added sugars and caloric sweeteners and things like soft drinks."

Still, he said, specific guidelines for sugars and trans fats would have been better.

Among the changes in the guidelines is a call for whole grains to make up half the grains in people's diets, at least three ounces every day. The daily servings of fruits and vegetables rose to nine, from five. The guidelines recommend three cups of low-fat or fat-free dairy products a day, up from two cups.

Saturated fat and cholesterol recommendations remain the same: 10 percent of calories from saturated fat and less than 300 milligrams a day of cholesterol. But while the government previously recommended that fat account for no more than 30 percent of total calories, the current recommendation is a range of from 20 percent to 35 percent.

Maximum levels of sodium have been reduced from 2,400 milligrams a day to 2,300, which is about one teaspoon a day.

Previously, the government recommended a half hour of exercise a day. The new guidelines say that is a minimum and that 60 minutes a day of moderate to vigorous exercise is needed to keep from gaining weight. Sixty to 90 minutes are needed to lose weight. Activities could include walking, bicycling and hiking.

The biggest question is what impact these guidelines will have. They will be used to recreate or replace the food pyramid, the government's graphic depiction of a proper diet. The new version is expected in a month or two.

But whether consumers will use, or even be aware of, the guidelines remains to be seen.

"I don't think many people read them or understand them," Dr. Brownell said, "because the government puts very little muscle into marketing them. If you ask 10 people on the street do they know about this or previous guidelines no one will know anything, but if you ask them what candy melts in your mouth not in your hand, 9 out of 10 will know."

Federal school lunch programs, and other federal food programs, must abide by the guidelines. But Ellen Haas, a former Agriculture Department official, said about 30 percent of the government subsidized lunches at school did not follow government guidelines and were high in fat, salt and sugar.

At the moment the two agencies responsible for the guidelines, the Agriculture Department and the Department of Health and Human Services, have earmarked no money for promotion. Nor have they begun developing partnerships with private industry to disseminate the information in the guidelines.

Asked at a news conference introducing the guidelines whether the government had any plans to limit advertising and marketing of less-healthy food to children, Mr. Thompson called advertising a form of free speech and said the administration "would not in any way curtail people's freedom" to say what they wanted.

Kim Severson contributed reporting from New York for this article.


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: diet; exercise; health; nutrition; obesity
More details on the guidelines can be found on the federal government's Web site, at http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/

U.S. Government Updates Diet Rules for Next Food Pyramid


1 posted on 01/13/2005 1:49:28 PM PST by neverdem
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To: neverdem
No beer?
2 posted on 01/13/2005 1:52:49 PM PST by b4its2late (You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say will be misquoted, then used against you.)
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To: b4its2late

Wouldn't that be considered whole grains?


3 posted on 01/13/2005 1:54:25 PM PST by mlc9852
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To: neverdem
The guidelines, which follow several years of reports that Americans are fatter than ever, recommend eating many more fruits and vegetables, more low-fat milk, more whole grains and increasing exercise to as much as an hour and a half a day. But some critics question whether they will make any difference in an increasingly fat America.

IT'S THE SUGAR, STUPID.

4 posted on 01/13/2005 2:00:33 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Drug prohibition laws help fund terrorism.)
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To: mlc9852

Funny. I went to a lower carb, but higher fat diet and my cholesterol dropped from 195 to 145.


5 posted on 01/13/2005 2:02:43 PM PST by Ingtar (Understanding is a three-edged sword : your side, my side, and the truth in between ." -- Kosh)
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To: neverdem
Fasting. I once went 14 days with zero calories except what might have been in the vitamin tablets. It really works. No gimmicks. No disappointments. No misinterpretations. No reservations. Easy to understand.
6 posted on 01/13/2005 2:03:09 PM PST by bayourod (The states and cities with large immigrant labor pools are the prosperous ones.)
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To: b4its2late

1st it was 15 minutes a day, then 20,then 30, now 90?

All the 'healthy' will have time to do is eat all their servings of veggies and exercise. Good excuse to quit work?


7 posted on 01/13/2005 2:09:40 PM PST by Rakkasan1 (Justice of the Piece: There is no justice, there's 'just us'.)
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To: neverdem
Diet=Weight loss! Hmmm! My tax money being spent wisely! Diet=Weight loss! Amazing, isn't it!

Beer/Alcohol=Get Drunk! This equation brought to you by the Free Dinkers Society......No Charge!

8 posted on 01/13/2005 2:10:51 PM PST by Bushbacker1
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To: Bushbacker1

That's "Free Drinkers Society"


9 posted on 01/13/2005 2:12:23 PM PST by Bushbacker1
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To: Bushbacker1
Beer/Alcohol=Get Drunk! This equation brought to you by the Free Dinkers Society......No Charge!

"Hmmm...your ideas intrigue me. I would like to subscribe to your newsletter." - Homer Simpson

10 posted on 01/13/2005 2:12:32 PM PST by retrokitten
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
IMO, sugar tops the list as the cause of not only obesity, but other health problems as well. From what I know of family and others, children brought up on boxed sugared cereal, sugar soft drinks, and high carb snacks of all kind are often fat and/or hyper. Such a shame.
11 posted on 01/13/2005 2:17:20 PM PST by dasein64
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
BINGO!!

Personally, I can't understand why they recommend any sugar in a nutritional diet (outside of those naturally occuring in fruit, etc.)

As I understand it, raw sugar is only a recent addition to the diets of western man, relatively speaking (sometime in the mid-18th century, I think).

And we've seen nothing but related health problems since. Like alcohol, I believe it is only good in moderation, though I'm certainly not recommending it be regulated in the same way as alcohol.

12 posted on 01/13/2005 2:17:57 PM PST by safeasthebanks ("The most rewarding part, was when he gave me my money!" - Dr. Nick)
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To: neverdem

Too much fruit and too much milk. What a bunch of yo-yos. Who the hell needs all that fruit??? Fresh veggies are one thing (not counting starchy veggies like peas and corn), but that's too much fruit. You can get your fiber and vitamins from other sources.


13 posted on 01/13/2005 2:20:54 PM PST by Huck (I only type LOL when I'm really LOL.)
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To: bayourod
Fasting. I once went 14 days with zero calories except what might have been in the vitamin tablets. It really works. No gimmicks. No disappointments. No misinterpretations. No reservations. Easy to understand.

I made it 4.5 days once, but it was unsustainable.

I fast every other day now - fast 36 hours, eat what I want for 12 hours - and it works for me.

I believe that, when your stomach is empty, your body has a chance to direct the energy used for digesting food into healing and producing hormones.

When your stomach is full, 50% of your energy is going toward food digestion.

14 posted on 01/13/2005 2:25:44 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Drug prohibition laws help fund terrorism.)
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To: El Gato; JudyB1938; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Robert A. Cook, PE; lepton; LadyDoc; jb6; tiamat; PGalt; ..

FReepmail me if you want on or off my health and science ping list.


15 posted on 01/13/2005 2:27:33 PM PST by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem

Fearless prediction forthcoming: They're saying that 60% of Americans are overweight. Let's accept that premise for the moment. Can it be too soon before we hear that 95% of those overweight Americans are Democrats? Think about it? ask yourselves..what are the politics of most heavyset people you know?


16 posted on 01/13/2005 2:31:11 PM PST by ken5050
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

Fasting is a great way to cleanse your body, too. I try to do it once a week for 36 hours. I think it's a great way to learn to appreciate real food - sure that Whopper looks good now...but bleh... :-)


17 posted on 01/13/2005 2:41:54 PM PST by arizonarachel (countdown to wedding day: T-minus 156 days & counting!)
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To: ken5050

Lardbutts are lardbutts, you can't correlate that with political affiliation.


18 posted on 01/13/2005 2:45:42 PM PST by stacytec
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

You got it! I wonder how long it is gonna take for people to realize that, even with the wild success of the Atkins and other low-carb, no processed sugar diets...


19 posted on 01/13/2005 3:20:09 PM PST by America_Right (Are there any REAL conservatives left to vote for?)
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To: Ingtar
I went to a lower carb, but higher fat diet and my cholesterol dropped from 195 to 145.

That's interesting. I wonder if you are eating a higher ratio of unsaturated fats or is some other biochemical change involved. I wonder if this is a trend.

I'm amazed the low-carb diet works. I've gone on low fat diabetic diets with my pregnancies and couldn't believe the huge amount of food I had to eat to get the desired weight gain.

My cholesterol has gone a few points higher this year. Corresponds to getting cable and the Food Network! I've become the queen of the butter sauces.

20 posted on 01/13/2005 6:04:49 PM PST by lizma
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To: safeasthebanks
raw sugar is only a recent addition to the diets of western man

I've read, don't know if it's true, that Queen Elizabeth I ate so much sugar that all her teeth had blacken. It seems sugar was a delicacy/problem for the royalty class that eventually filtered down to everyone.

(I've also read that the lipstick she used eventually ate off her lips and that is the reason there are no portraits of her in old age. Who knows but based on what we do know of what chemicals went into medieval makeup, it's possible. They used a lot of lead. Makes sugar sound not that bad.)

21 posted on 01/13/2005 6:24:06 PM PST by lizma
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To: neverdem
I think the problem is not just just sugar it is about how foods affect your blood sugars. Check out the gi diet.
22 posted on 02/17/2006 1:24:17 AM PST by BlueMango
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To: neverdem

Please daddy government, make me behave. I can't control myself.


23 posted on 02/17/2006 1:27:41 AM PST by Modok
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To: neverdem

I use the Free Republic diet plan - a picture of a liberal politician or media figure to help me barf my lunch and plenty of red meat.


24 posted on 02/17/2006 1:32:54 AM PST by Tall_Texan (Hey Libs! - Remember how conservatives looked during Clinton? Guess what you haters look like now?)
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