Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

To: fo0hzy

Still not funny.


9 posted on 01/13/2005 6:02:44 PM PST by veronica (Got a script? Go here - http://www.filmmonterey.org/screenwriting.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies ]


To: veronica

I give up.

But I think I heard a snicker.


12 posted on 01/13/2005 6:05:42 PM PST by fo0hzy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies ]

To: veronica
"Still not funny"

There are several ways to render a subject beyond the pale.

One way is to name the person an anti-Semite. As in respectable society anti-Semitism is unacceptable, the so-named individual will be shunned and politically impotent. However, this will only work in a society that is ALREADY overwhelmingly against the exercise of actual anti-Semitic practice.

Another way to render a person impotent is to make him ridiculous. Ridiculousness has broader reach than intellectual argument. This image makes Hitler totally ridiculous. This does NOT minimize the horror Hitler caused. It merely makes him totally ridiculous -- and incapable of serious consideration as a person or power to emulate.

Humor has long been a "weapon" used in totalitarian regimes by the populace who could do nothing else to resist but indulge in dry humor. It was a way of gaining solidarity with others against the regime.

There are very many. One on the top of my head:

A fish monger in WWII time Germany cries:

Hering, so fett wie Goering (Herring as fat as Goering).

The Gestapo arrests him and puts him in prison for four weeks. When released his cry is:

Hering, so fett wie vor vier Wochen (Herring as fat as four weeks ago).

I.E. Goering was a fat, pompous, ridiculous figure -- and the people knew it . . .
18 posted on 01/13/2005 6:15:54 PM PST by AMDG&BVMH
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson