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INDIANA FLOOD PAGE
USGS Indiana District ^ | January 14, 2004 | USGS Indiana District

Posted on 01/14/2005 1:52:41 PM PST by Military family member

JANUARY 2005

Flood Summary

During the first 6 days of January, moderate to heavy rains fell on soils already saturated from snowmelt.

Rainfall totals for January 1 through 6 ranged from more than 2 inches in north-central Indiana to more than 6 inches in south-central Indiana. Significant flooding occurred on Indiana rivers and streams, particularly in central and southern Indiana. Rivers affected included the Big Blue River, White River, East Fork White River, and Wabash River. More moderate to heavy rains on January 11 and January 13 brought rivers and streams across Indiana up again.

 

Flood Updates

January 13: The Wabash River at Mt Carmel streamflow-gaging station recorded a river level of 33.95 this morning at 7:00 am; this level is nearly one foot above the 1913 crest of 33.00 feet. The lower White River was receding in the Petersburg area this morning; however, the White River on the north side of Indianapolis was rising in response to Tuesday's rainfall. Levels this morning at the White River at Noblesville station exceeded levels recorded during the flooding that occurred on January 6 and 7. Moderate to heavy rain was falling across much of Indiana this morning, causing small streams to begin to rise. This morning USGS crews were dispatched to Fort Wayne, Crawfordsville, and Arcadia in northern Hamilton County to make streamflow measurements at gaging stations. Crews plan to make measurements at Stony Creek near Noblesville and White River at Noblesville this afternoon.


January 12: At 7:00 am, automated equipment at the USGS Wabash River at Mt Carmel streamflow-gaging station recorded a river level of 33.85 feet, the highest level ever recorded at this station. The current river level is 0.85 feet above the 1913 flood peak. USGS crews will be measuring streamflow at the Mt Carmel station today to verify the accuracy of data from the station. Yesterday crews measured streamflow at the White River at Petersburg and Wabash River at Riverton stations.

Some smaller streams in central Indiana peaked last night because of heavy rains at similar levels to last week (January 5 and 6). USGS crews have been focusing on southwest Indiana the last several days, but will move north this evening in case central or northern Indiana receive heavy rains tonight.


January 11: Automated equipment at the USGS streamflow-gaging station Wabash at Mt. Carmel today recorded a historic river level of 33.08 feet--the highest river level measured since the 1913 flood peak of 33.00 feet. The 33.08 level was recorded at 3:00 am on January 11 and the river was still rising. This level is the highest in the history of this station (records date back to 1875).

USGS crews today will make streamflow measurements at the White River at Petersburg and Wabash River at Riverton stations as levels peak, then will head to Mt. Carmel to make a measurement late today or early tomorrow. Yesterday crews made measurements at the streamflow gaging stations East Fork White River at Bedford and East Fork White River at Shoals and confirmed the accuracy of the discharge data from those stations. Accurate discharge data is vital to the National Weather Service for forecasting flood crests.



TOPICS: Announcements; Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; US: Illinois; US: Indiana; US: Kentucky
KEYWORDS: floods; indiana
Here in Terre Haute (French for "High Ground" thank goodness), we have received nearly 15 inches of rain since January 1.

The temperature outside right now is about 20 degrees, meaning all those homes under water are now being frozen and/or crushed by the contractions of freezing water.

We are experiencing record levels for all the rivers in the area. Newly elected Gov. Mitch Daniels has already called for federal disaster relief.

1 posted on 01/14/2005 1:52:42 PM PST by Military family member
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To: Military family member

I spent my childhood in Evansville swimming in the Ohio River backwaters.


2 posted on 01/14/2005 1:57:23 PM PST by MarkeyD (<a href="http://www.johnkerry.com">Loser</a>)
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To: Military family member

Is the whole state having flooding or just the south? My parents have a house right on a river in Rochester IN.


3 posted on 01/14/2005 1:57:47 PM PST by Daus
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To: Military family member

Doesn't water expand as it freezes?


4 posted on 01/14/2005 1:57:57 PM PST by MarkeyD (<a href="http://www.johnkerry.com">Loser</a>)
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To: Daus

there is flooding all odver the state. Decatur, Indiana is completely isolated, according my parents who live 170 miles northeast of Terre Haute.


5 posted on 01/14/2005 1:59:27 PM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: Daus

It's the whole state. I live north of Indianapolis. It's bad here and farther north it is worse.


6 posted on 01/14/2005 2:00:39 PM PST by hoosierpearl (No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy, than a U.S. Marine.)
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To: MarkeyD
It does both, if I recall my chemistry class from high school correctly. Initially, it contracts, then as it hits 32 degrees, expands.

Either way, local experts are saying that the houses are probably finished.

7 posted on 01/14/2005 2:01:07 PM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: hoosierpearl
Here in West Central Indiana, it's pretty bad. Today if the first day since January 1 without measurable precipitation.

I've seen pictures of homes flooded above second story windows.

8 posted on 01/14/2005 2:05:02 PM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: hoosierpearl

I'm 40 miles south of Ft Wayne on the Mississinewa. High water, closed roads, homes evacuated. The water is receding, thank Heaven.


9 posted on 01/14/2005 2:06:40 PM PST by raisincane (Lead, follow, or get out of the way.....W2)
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To: MarkeyD
"Doesn't water expand as it freezes?"

I don't want to get too technical here, but it turns to ice with a lower specific gravity than when it was water.

10 posted on 01/14/2005 2:08:26 PM PST by Deaf Smith
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To: Military family member

anyone know how things look in bloomington?


11 posted on 01/14/2005 2:12:49 PM PST by OldCorps
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To: Military family member

Thanks for the update.


12 posted on 01/14/2005 2:14:37 PM PST by Daus
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To: OldCorps

Or as we call it here, the People's Republic of Bloomington...I think they are just as bad as everywhere else.


13 posted on 01/14/2005 2:15:43 PM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: MarkeyD

Now you won't have to leave your house! You can use the front porch as a diving board


14 posted on 01/14/2005 2:19:39 PM PST by Lowell (The voice from beyond the edge!)
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To: Military family member

no kidding! you live in bloomington?


15 posted on 01/14/2005 2:27:04 PM PST by OldCorps
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To: Military family member
Here is one of todays local stories on the flooding in Hazleton, In. It has been a busy week here. They have managed to keep the town from flooding. I was there Wed. and the work that has been done by the residents and National Guard is incredible.

As parts of levee fail, work begins on a new one

Posted: Friday, Jan 14, 2005 - 10:15:54 am EST

By SUZY HEICHELBECH Staff Writer

HAZLETON-Wednesday night proved to be by far the worst night so far for officials at the Hazleton levee, as parts of the levee collapsed four times allowing some of White River water that for days has tried to push past its barrier, to flow into the town.

Hazleton Fire Chief Mike Ellis said a 30 inch storm sewer pipe that goes through the levee failed. "We originally thought the end of the pipe on the river side had opened up letting water into the levee, but we realized that there was a leak in the pipe within the levee, causing the water to swell up inside," he said. "We began rolling sandbags around both sides of the levee to give it extra support. The first collapse occurred at 2:15 a.m., it was one foot across."

Chief Ellis describes that collapse as a slump, saying that a slump caves in, sucking the sandbags inside. "There was a National Guard member standing on the part that collapsed, when he began to feel it he jumped off," said Chief Ellis.

Troops did not stop their work, they quickly began redoubling their sandbagging efforts to build up the levee and make it stronger.

The second collapse was at 2:40 a.m. and the third happened about an hour later, Ellis said. The third cave-in being the worst. "It actually slumped below the river's height. Water began coming into the town. We quickly began pumping the water out of the streets back into the river," Chief Ellis said.

The fourth collapse happened in a different area. It was a small collapse near Brown Street. Mark Ellis, brother of the fire chief, said that collapse happened as troops examined that part of the levee. "We had a few volunteers located at the levee on Brown Street," he said. "It just so happens some members of the National Guard went over there to check on them. As soon as they made it over the top of the levee collapsed. They immediately began applying sandbags."

Chief Ellis said they knew they were in the midst of a heavy battle so they had a county-wide page for all available firefighters in the county to come help sandbag, hoping to create a sandbag dome that might give the levee extra height.

Hazleton firefighter Greg Longabaugh was brought to tears as he described what it was like being on the levee when it started to collapse.

"I don't know how to describe it in words. It just started sucking a big hole straight down, the sandbags just fell straight down," he said with obvious emotion. "It is amazing how those troops just started running around packing sandbags, they could not go fast enough. No one used the bathroom, no one ate.

"If there is any praise to be given for that levee still being there, it goes to God and the National Guard."

Chief Ellis agreed with Longabaugh's praise of levee workers.

"The National Guard, volunteers and firemen saved this town. If any of them would have stopped when that levee collapsed we would have lost the levee completely," he said.

While still optimistic about the integrity of the levee, the chief knows the situation could worsen at any time.

"It's not over yet, it could still cave in more. It's a wait and see game right now, but one thing is for sure this one about got us," said Chief Ellis.

Geology hydrologists from Louisville were brought in to help determine the best steps to take with the latest levee developments.

"They are making studies, coming up with scenarios to help fight off the problem," said Chief Ellis.

The solution they came up with was to build a new levee out of rock.

As if the collapse of parts of the levee was not enough to deal with, Chief Ellis said many other problems came up throughout Wednesday evening.

"We still had boils popping up, Haz-mat was called in to deal with sewage problems and all troops, volunteers and fireman have to now get tetanus shots if they work near the water or handle sand bags for fear of contaminated water," he said. "With sewer problems and so many thing moving downstream we are taking precautionary measures in case there is any contamination in the water."

The physical and emotional effects may be beginning to take a toll on levee workers, as well. Local volunteers and firefighters have been working since Sunday.

"The National Guard is trained to do this sort of thing , but our guys are not," said head kitchen cook volunteer Joyce Ellis, the chief's wife.

Chad Ellis, the chief's nephew, said he thinks local volunteers are doing a great job protecting the community.

"I over heard the governor talk about how great the guard was and what a good job they are doing, but I believe our locals are doing great also," he said. "There have been times where there were more local civilians on the ground than guard troops. People I've never seen before coming from all over the county to help, it's unbelievable."

Chief Ellis insisted the fight to contain the river will go on and whether it is local civilians, fire fighters or troops doing the work, there is still plenty to face in the coming days.

"We have to concentrate on boils, and soft spots, as well as the possibility for more cave-ins, but we are also worried about the freezing temperatures," he said. "It will make our job more difficult and possibly could freeze up our pumps. We are not going to let this thing go without a fight."

Here are some photos of the flooded areas:

http://section30.fynsections.com/main.asp?SectionID=3

16 posted on 01/14/2005 3:05:37 PM PST by freedom4ever
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To: MarkeyD

The post I made on Hazleton is a town about 35 miles north of Evansville, in Southwestern Indiana. I don't know if you remember it or anything.


17 posted on 01/14/2005 3:11:42 PM PST by freedom4ever
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To: Military family member

As lousy as all the rain has been, be thankful you're not in the Anderson-Muncie area. I understand that there are still some who do not have power nine days after that ice storm last week.


18 posted on 01/14/2005 3:12:02 PM PST by curmudgeonII (Time wounds all heels.)
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To: raisincane

Hmm.. I grew up in Marion.


19 posted on 01/14/2005 3:14:56 PM PST by A. Morgan ( If I wanted to see Horsesh*t, I could go out to the barn and see it for free.)
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To: raisincane
I'm 40 miles south of Ft Wayne on the Mississinewa. High water, closed roads, homes evacuated. The water is receding, thank Heaven.

Sounds like you're near my folk's hometown of Marion.

20 posted on 01/14/2005 3:18:35 PM PST by prairie dog
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To: freedom4ever

I remember Hazleton only because I lived in Chicago for 20 years and have driven Chicago to Evansville on Hwy 41 more times than I can even remember.


21 posted on 01/14/2005 3:21:24 PM PST by MarkeyD (<a href="http://www.johnkerry.com">Loser</a>)
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To: A. Morgan

my parents live in Wabash


22 posted on 01/14/2005 3:27:19 PM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: OldCorps

Most of the highways going in and out of Columbus [near the rivers] are flooded over. Every major road is flooded somewhere, including 46 west going to Brown County [and Bloomington]. How Bloomington is depends on whether there are rivers going through it.
I didn't see any going through Bloomington on the map, so relatively speaking they are probably all right. The creeks are undoubtedly flooded but that is minor compared to a river. The White River is in very bad shape flood wise, and it is quite a bit west of Bloomington. Monroe Reservoir is east and doesn't look to be very close. Bloomington is probably in better shape than most other areas.


23 posted on 01/14/2005 6:37:45 PM PST by hoosierpearl (No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy, than a U.S. Marine.)
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To: curmudgeonII

I'm in Anderson. In addition to the flood, 8,000 people have been evacuated Friday night due to a fire at a magnesium factory.


24 posted on 01/14/2005 7:56:50 PM PST by rdl6989
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To: rdl6989

Sorry to hear about the mag. fire. I pray few were injured. In addition to cold temps tonight, no electricity and the flooding...now a fire.

We're up in South Bend area. Flooding all over the lowlying areas or river & covering roads, Baugo Twp in Elkhart has mjr flooding too. People being warned if there is standing water over/near your well, don't drink the water. Luckily, we're on the high area north of river so we're just sloppy. Praying for those suffering.


25 posted on 01/14/2005 11:16:24 PM PST by bremenboy (I am always right except when I am wrong)
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To: bremenboy

Here is a link to a thread here on it. No injuries but 5,000-8,000 evacuated to shelters due to fumes.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1321239/posts


26 posted on 01/14/2005 11:26:07 PM PST by rdl6989
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To: Military family member
I'm here in North Indy, and its not so bad here.

But where's the UN and the rest of the internationalist buffoons when it's flooding in Indiana?

Nowhere I can see. And that's a good thing - my buddies and I like to use blue-helmeted dummies for rifle and shotgun practice. Just. In. Case.

27 posted on 01/15/2005 2:17:45 AM PST by FierceDraka ("SO SAY WE ALL!")
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To: A. Morgan

From a Giant to another, Howdy!


28 posted on 01/15/2005 3:51:11 AM PST by raisincane (Lead, follow, or get out of the way.....W2)
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To: prairie dog

Sounds like you're near my folk's hometown of Marion.


Marion is my hometown too.


29 posted on 01/15/2005 3:53:49 AM PST by raisincane (Lead, follow, or get out of the way.....W2)
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To: Military family member
OMG. I went to college in Indiana. The people there are so good hearted (Ok, those Indiana girls are a lot more wild than people suspect.) My prayers go out to all of them.
30 posted on 01/15/2005 4:01:46 AM PST by Caipirabob (Democrats.. Socialists..Commies..Traitors...Who can tell the difference?)
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To: Caipirabob

Did you say something about Indiana girls? :-)


31 posted on 01/15/2005 5:37:40 AM PST by Indiana Girl
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To: Indiana Girl
Winter would have been a LOT COLDER without them! = )
32 posted on 01/15/2005 6:04:44 AM PST by Caipirabob (Democrats.. Socialists..Commies..Traitors...Who can tell the difference?)
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To: raisincane

I recall back in the Sixties that the Wabash, Salamonie, and Mississinewa dam projects were built to alleviate such flooding problems. Have they helped or hindered in this round of flooding?


33 posted on 01/15/2005 6:19:48 AM PST by prairie dog
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To: Indiana Girl
They just posted a Warning on television. The levee along the Wabash here in Terre Haute has broken in four areas.
34 posted on 01/15/2005 8:43:29 AM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: MarkeyD; Daus; hoosierpearl; raisincane; Deaf Smith; OldCorps; Lowell; curmudgeonII; ...
Things have gone from bad to worse; Three or four different levees have broken in several spots along the Wabash on the West side of the River. They have evacuate Dresser, much of Clinton, Praireton, and several other small towns along the river. The Emergency Management Team is asking for every able body to bring a shovel and start filling sandbags. The river rose as much 16 feet in minutes in some area when the water broke through

It's also dropping down to single digits tonight and we're expecting snow.

And the hits keep coming....

35 posted on 01/15/2005 4:22:43 PM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: Military family member

Bump...


36 posted on 01/15/2005 4:39:02 PM PST by Cheetah1
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To: Cheetah1

These are photos from Paducah, KY and Smithland, KY

http://www5.wright-weather.com/bb/showthread.php?s=&postid=387099#post387099


37 posted on 01/15/2005 5:29:46 PM PST by Cheetah1
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To: Military family member

Here are links to information on Vermillion County flooding.

http://www.wthi.com/newsdet.asp?id=7568


http://www.wthi.com/newsdet.asp?id=7575
Unfortunately the high water isn't the only problem. City officials tried to protect the pump from the water, but hours later it stopped working, which means sewage will eventually back up in homeowner's yards. "You just take it as a grain of salt and you move on," says Kevin Kiger.

Since the pump stopped working in that area residents are asked to watch what goes down the drain and try not to flush the toilet very much. If you were forced to evacuate your home the American Red Cross set up a shelter at Central Elementary School the number is 812-232-3393. Or City Hall in Clinton is open, just bring a sleeping bag.


38 posted on 01/15/2005 6:17:51 PM PST by rdl6989
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To: Daus
My parents have a house right on a river in Rochester IN.

Not too bad up there. Where on the Tippy are they? I'm from Leiters Ford.

39 posted on 01/16/2005 11:28:31 AM PST by digger48
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To: Daus

My apologies, I relied on bad info. Just talked to my father, who has lived within a mile (not on) the Tippicanoe River for 50 years. He said he's never seen it so high. Guess what I'm sayin', if it's flooded before, it definitely has this time. Hope they were high and dry.


40 posted on 01/16/2005 12:51:08 PM PST by digger48
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To: digger48

That's "Tippecanoe"


41 posted on 01/16/2005 12:52:24 PM PST by digger48
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To: Military family member
Just got back to Virginia from taking our youngest son to Indiana University ~ and we saw some water.

I've been telling my wife for years and years about how sometimes Indiana looks like it's made up of a very large lake with elevated roads serving as causeways between various high spots.

She finally saw what I meant.

We came in on I-70, went through Naptown to I-65, and went South to Seymour. Then we went West over US 50 to Bedford and Indiana 37 to Bloomington. We returned to Seymour via Indiana 46 to I65, and went South. One day on the trip we drove up to 86/82nd street, and crossed Keystone from the West on 73rd street last Thursday. That was just before the White River overflowed. I was nervous about that place. The water was "right there!".

Let me contrast what happened in 1956 with what happened now. There was a flood in Southern Indiana South of Martinsville. There was no TV or weather radar. Weather reports were spotty. No general reports were made about which roads were open and which weren't. Indiana 37, elevated the whole way, was about the only access route to the Evansville, Indiana area, but when you got to the Ohio, there was no flood.

No doubt many homes were lost, but there are few photos of it.

This year, 2005, the whole thing got on TV and minor events achieved a significance far beyond their importance. Helicopters enabled you to get pictures of folks getting into boats, getting to shore, grabbing stuff, and going back to their flooded homes to (presumably) sit on the roof in the cold ~ truly bizarre stuff I really didn't know happened!

The weather maps were incredible, and at a glance you could see what was happening.

The flood control dams seem to have worked and the Wabash will not become the disaster it used to become.

I can't say the floods in Indiana are tamed, but it sure was different this time. Guess my ability to navigate around the worst places is evidence of that.

BTW, the White River along Indiana 67 between Martinsville and Mooresville was exceptionally beautiful in the sunshine Saturday ~ it also looked to be several miles wide. No doubt Father Brebeauf saw such sights before the Shawnee cooked and ate the man.

42 posted on 01/16/2005 4:52:08 PM PST by muawiyah (Egypt didn't invent civilization time)
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To: digger48

Thanks for the info. Haven't heard from my folks yet. They have two places. On one Manitou and a place right on the river due west of Rochester on W450 or something like that.


43 posted on 01/16/2005 5:13:02 PM PST by Daus
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To: Military family member
Either way, local experts are saying that the houses are probably finished.

Probably. The worst will come as the ice breaks up and moves, which will finish the job.

44 posted on 01/18/2005 9:15:22 AM PST by Smokin' Joe (This tagline has been disconnected or is no longer in service...)
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To: rdl6989

Anderson Freepers PING!


45 posted on 01/18/2005 9:44:39 AM PST by Ignatz ("Scribe of the Unwritten Law". ( Hey, someone's gotta NOT write this stuff down! ))
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