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Happy Birthday-Robert E Lee
Civil War Home ^

Posted on 01/19/2005 7:38:59 AM PST by Valin

The idol of the South to this day, Virginian Robert E. Lee had some difficulty in adjusting to the new form of warfare that unfolded with the Civil war, but this did not prevent him from keeping the Union armies in Virginia at bay for almost three years. The son of Revolutionary War hero "Light Horse" Harry Lee-who fell into disrepute in his later years attended West Point and graduated second in his class. During his four years at the military academy he did not earn a single demerit and served as the cadet corps' adjutant. Upon his 1829 graduation he was posted to the engineers. Before the Mexican War he served on engineering projects in Georgia, Virginia, and New York. During the war he served on the staffs of John Wool and Winfield Scott. Particularly distinguishing himself scouting for and guiding troops, he won three brevets and was slightly wounded at Chapultepec.

Following a stint in Baltimore Harbor he became superintendent of the military academy in 1852. When the mounted arm was expanded in 1855, Lee accepted the lieutenant colonelcy of the 2nd Cavalry in order to escape from the painfully slow promotion in the engineers. Ordered to western Texas, he served with his regiment until the 1857 death of his father-in-law forced him to ask for a series of leaves to settle the estate.

In 1859 he was called upon to lead a force of marines, to join with the militia on the scene, to put an end to John Brown's Harper's Ferry Raid. Thereafter he served again in Texas until summoned to Washington in 1861 by Winfield Scott who tried to retain Lee in the U. S. service. But the Virginian rejected the command of the Union's field forces on the day after Virginia seceded. He then accepted an invitation to visit Governor John Letcher in Virginia. His resignation as colonel, 1st Cavalry-to which he had recently been promoted-was accepted on April 25, 1861.

His Southern assignments included: major general, Virginia's land and naval forces (April 23, 1861); commanding Virginia forces (April 23 July 1861); brigadier general, CSA (May 14, 186 1); general, CSA (from June 14, 186 1); commanding Department of Northwestern Virginia (late July-October 1861); commanding Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida (November 8, 186 1-March 3, 1862); and commanding Army of Northern Virginia June 1, 1862-April 9, 1865).

In charge of Virginia's fledgling military might, he was mainly involved in organizational matters. As a Confederate brigadier general, and later full general, he was in charge of supervising all Southern forces in Virginia. In the first summer of the war he was given his first field command in western Virginia. His Cheat Mountain Campaign was a disappointing fizzle largely due to the failings of his superiors. His entire tenure in the region was unpleasant, dealing with the bickering of his subordinates-William W. Loring, John B. Floyd, and Henry A. Wise. After this he became known throughout the South as "Granny Lee. " His debut in field command had not been promising, but Jefferson Davis appointed him to command along the Southern Coast.

Early in 1862 he was recalled to Richmond and made an advisor to the president. From this position he had some influence over military operations, especially those of Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley. When Joseph E. Johnston launched his attack at Seven Pines, Davis and Lee were taken by surprise and rode out to the field. In the confusion of the fight Johnston was badly wounded, and that night Davis instructed Lee to take command of what he renamed the Army of Northern Virginia. He fought the second day of the battle but the initiative had already been lost the previous day. Later in the month, in a daring move, he left a small force in front of Richmond and crossed the Chickahominy to strike the one Union corps north of the river. In what was to be called the Seven Days Battles the individual fights-Beaver Dam Creek, Gaines' Mill, Savage Station, Glendale, White Oak Swamp, and Malvern Hill-were all tactical defeats for the Confederates. But Lee had achieved the strategic goal of removing McClellan's army from the very gates of Richmond.

This created a new opinion of Lee in the South. He gradually became "Uncle Robert" and "Marse Robert." With McClellan neutralized, a new threat developed under John Pope in northern Virginia. At first Lee detached Jackson and then followed with Longstreet's command. Winning at 2nd Bull Run, he moved on into Maryland but suffered the misfortune of having a copy of his orders detailing the disposition of his divided forces fall into the hands of the enemy. McClellan moved with unusual speed and Lee was forced to fight a delaying action along South Mountain while waiting for Jackson to complete the capture of Harpers Ferry and rejoin him. He masterfully fought McClellan to a stand still at Antietam and two days later recrossed the Potomac.

Near the end of the year he won an easy victory over Burnside at Fredericksburg and then trounced Hooker in his most creditable victory at Chancellorsville, where he had detached Jackson with most of the army on a lengthy flank march while he remained with only two divisions in the immediate front of the Union army. Launching his second invasion of the North, he lost at Gettysburg. On the third day of the battle he displayed one of his major faults when at Malvern Hill and on other fields-he ordered a massed infantry assault across a wide plain, not recognizing that the rifle, which had come into use since the Mexican War, put the charging troops under fire for too long a period. Another problem was his issuance of general orders to be executed by his subordinates.

Returning to Virginia he commanded in the inconclusive Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns. From the Wilderness to Petersburg he fought a retiring campaign against Grant in which he made full use of entrenchments, becoming known as "Ace of Spades" Lee. Finally forced into a siege, he held on to Richmond and Petersburg for nearly 10 months before beginning his retreat to Appomattox, where he was forced to surrender. On January 23, 1865, he had been named as commander in chief of the Confederate armies but he found himself too burdened in Virginia to give more than general directives to the other theaters.

Lee returned to Richmond as a paroled prisoner of war, and submitted with the utmost composure to an altered destiny. He devoted the rest of his life to setting an example of conduct for other thousands of ex-Confederates. He refused a number of offers which would have secured substantial means for his family. Instead, he assumed the presidency of Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia, and his reputation revitalized the school after the war. Lee's enormous wartime prestige, both in the North and South, and the devotion inspired by his unconscious symbolism of the "Lost Cause" made his a legendary figure even before his death. He died on October 12 1870, of heart disease which had plagued him since the spring of 1863, at Lexington, Va. and is buried there. Somehow, his application for restoration of citizenship was mislaid, and it was not until the 1970's that it was found and granted.

Source: "Who Was Who In The Civil War" by Stewart Sifakis


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: civilwar; dixie; dixielist; happybirthday; robertelee
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Farewell to the Army of Northern Virginia
by Robert E. Lee

After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources.

I need not tell the survivors of so many hard-fought battles who have remained steadfast to the last that I have consented to this result from no distrust of them; but feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that could compensate for the loss that would have attended the continuance of the contest, I determined to avoid the useless sacrifice of those whose past services have endeared them to their countrymen. By the terms of the agreement, officers and men can return to their homes and remain until exchanged.

You may take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful God will extend to you his blessing and protection.

With an unceasing admiration of your constancy and devotion to your country, and a grateful remembrance of your kind and generous consideration of myself, I bid you all an affectionate farewell.

1 posted on 01/19/2005 7:39:00 AM PST by Valin
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To: Valin

His lasting legacy is a great minstrel song: Waiting for the Robert E. Lee.


2 posted on 01/19/2005 7:40:11 AM PST by tallhappy (Juntos Podemos!)
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To: tallhappy
Site Meter
Robert E. Lee represented a racist south - and one whose lasting legacy was the involuntary enslavement of others. This man should not be celebrated.
3 posted on 01/19/2005 7:41:43 AM PST by KMC1
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To: Valin

I pass by his boyhood home in Alexandria, VA often. I always salute as I do. His memory deserves no less.


4 posted on 01/19/2005 7:42:54 AM PST by RexBeach
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To: tallhappy
His lasting legacy is a great minstrel song: Waiting for the Robert E. Lee.

And part of a lame Joan Baez song, "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down".

5 posted on 01/19/2005 7:43:10 AM PST by Non-Sequitur
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To: billbears; stainlessbanner; shuckmaster

Dixie ping


6 posted on 01/19/2005 7:44:55 AM PST by sheltonmac ("Duty is ours; consequences are God's." -Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson)
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To: Valin

I have just posted this on Christian News in maine.com for our readers, I am adding a link back here so that our readers can enjoy Freeper comments.


7 posted on 01/19/2005 7:46:42 AM PST by newsgatherer
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: KMC1

FO!


9 posted on 01/19/2005 7:47:14 AM PST by need_a_screen_name
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To: KMC1

Aw, come on. You just don't want to chip in on the birthday gift.

10 posted on 01/19/2005 7:48:00 AM PST by sheltonmac ("Duty is ours; consequences are God's." -Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson)
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To: All

Happy Birthday General Robert E. Lee. He is the definition of a gentleman.


11 posted on 01/19/2005 7:48:59 AM PST by skutter
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To: KMC1
Robert E. Lee represented a racist south - and one whose lasting legacy was the involuntary enslavement of others. This man should not be celebrated.

I don't know on which level to respond to this garbage. (not enough time while at work)

Happy Birthday Robert E. Lee!
From a PROUD Southerner!!!

12 posted on 01/19/2005 7:50:28 AM PST by SirChas
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To: Valin

13 posted on 01/19/2005 7:52:37 AM PST by need_a_screen_name
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To: Valin
This reminds me of one of my favorite bumper stickers.



Next thing you know, we'll celebrate Stalin & King George's birthday.
14 posted on 01/19/2005 7:53:27 AM PST by mnehring (Fear leads to the Dark Side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to the DNC.)
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To: cheif D

Ignorance really is bliss, isn't it?

15 posted on 01/19/2005 7:53:29 AM PST by sheltonmac ("Duty is ours; consequences are God's." -Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson)
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Comment #16 Removed by Moderator

To: cheif D; Admin Moderator

Go away newbie troll.


17 posted on 01/19/2005 7:58:54 AM PST by need_a_screen_name
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To: sheltonmac

Yup.

"If ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise."


18 posted on 01/19/2005 8:00:46 AM PST by RexBeach
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To: sheltonmac; cheif D

Maybe you two didnt catch this, but he was asked to be the Commander of US Forces. The only reason he didnt take it was because Virginia as a state suceded from the Union. And, although it doesnt say it, he lobbied for them not to.


19 posted on 01/19/2005 8:02:01 AM PST by Fyscat
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Comment #20 Removed by Moderator

To: Fyscat

The man's correct!

Lee also did one helluva job in the war with Mexico.


21 posted on 01/19/2005 8:04:44 AM PST by RexBeach
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To: KMC1

Would you say the same thing about George Washington, Thomas Jefferson?

Seeing the past as black or white really doesn't add much to the conversation other than a sense of faux moral pride. What did you do to liberate the slaves Dude?


22 posted on 01/19/2005 8:05:21 AM PST by cajungirl (my peeps are freeps)
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: Valin

Happy Birthday Robert E. Lee. You can count me as an unreconstructed Southerner and proud member of the party of Lincoln. I appreciate and revere American history...all of it.

Go Condi! Thank you Gen. Powell- faithful servant

:o)


24 posted on 01/19/2005 8:05:55 AM PST by Liberty Valance (Grateful Heart Tour 2005)
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To: Valin

Robert E Lee was a great commander and a fine Christian.

He is a role model for military men everywhere.

Were it not for him and his fellow soldiers, the Yankees would ahve thoroughly anihilated everything about the South that gave it distinction and made it into an immediate copy of the North.

God bless Bobby Lee.


25 posted on 01/19/2005 8:05:55 AM PST by JFK_Lib
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To: Fyscat

VA seceded after Winchester was burned to the ground over a dozen times.
I guess it *really* started to get next to them....:)


26 posted on 01/19/2005 8:06:06 AM PST by Salamander (I'm just pining for the Fnords)
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To: KMC1

"Robert E. Lee represented a racist south - and one whose lasting legacy was the involuntary enslavement of others. This man should not be celebrated."

Lee's critics would never speak that way to his face were they there.

It takes a special kind of coward to show disrespect to a man that even his enemies admired.

In short, go ESAD, loser.


27 posted on 01/19/2005 8:07:39 AM PST by JFK_Lib
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To: Valin
The following is an excerpt from an article titled "The Lessons of Robert E. Lee" written by Richard Poe for Front Page Magazine.

In 1856, he wrote to his wife, "In this enlightened age, there are few I believe, but what will acknowledge, that slavery as an institution, is a moral and political evil in any Country."

Lee believed that slaves should be emancipated gradually, their owners compensated, and the slaves trained and set up in steady jobs.

Lee never personally owned slaves. He was given charge of his father-in-law’s slaves after the man died. Lee freed them all, in slow stages. By the time Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, every slave in Lee’s charge had been freed.

Lee once urged Confederate president Jefferson Davis to emancipate all southern slaves and to allow "the use of… negroes as soldiers" to fight the Yankees. Davis rejected the plan.

After the war, Lee continued to set an example in treating black freedmen as equals.

At a service in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Richmond, a black man created a stir by rising to receive communion.

One witness reported that the parishioners "retained their seats in solemn silence and did not move," while the priest looked "embarassed."

It was Robert E. Lee who broke the ice. He strode up the aisle and knelt beside the black man to take communion. Others then rose and followed his lead.

28 posted on 01/19/2005 8:07:59 AM PST by SilentServiceCPOWife (Schni schna schnappi, schnappi, schnappi, schnapp!)
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To: cheif D

"A throwback who failed to adapt and ultimately lost all power.

I consistently fail to see why these losers are lionized. "


That you cannot see why people, even his enemies, admired General Lee says far more about your craven shallow nature than it ever could say about Lee.

Maybe you should stop smoking crack and read a good book on the man.


29 posted on 01/19/2005 8:09:05 AM PST by JFK_Lib
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To: KMC1
one whose lasting legacy was the involuntary enslavement of others

Are you saying we still have "involuntary enslavement of others" in the U.S.? If not, what in the world do you mean by "lasting legacy"?

Blaming General Lee for the Moslems (today's major slaveholders) is a bit much, don't you think?

30 posted on 01/19/2005 8:09:30 AM PST by Tax-chick ( The old woman who lives in the 15-passenger van.)
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To: mnehrling

"Next thing you know, we'll celebrate Stalin & King George's birthday."

I am sure you already do celebrate Stalins birthday, doofus.


31 posted on 01/19/2005 8:10:14 AM PST by JFK_Lib
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To: Valin

Read later.


32 posted on 01/19/2005 8:10:42 AM PST by EagleMamaMT
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To: cheif D

p.s., "I before E, except after C."


33 posted on 01/19/2005 8:12:06 AM PST by Tax-chick ( The old woman who lives in the 15-passenger van.)
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Comment #34 Removed by Moderator

To: cheif D
Ok, let's list all his great achievemnets:

1. um

2. er, uh

3. hmmmm

All that shows is how absurdly ignorant you are of Lee.

It is amazing that a man who accomplished as much as Lee could miss even your pea-brained attention.

35 posted on 01/19/2005 8:13:23 AM PST by JFK_Lib
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To: JFK_Lib

Why not, at least by the same logic that some would celebrate Lee's birthday. After all, Stalin helped us defeat the Nazis. How about Rommel, sure he fought for the Nazis, but his writing showed he hated Nazism and Hitler. Why not celebrate his birthday too? Hell, he was even in a plot to try to kill Hitler.

Sure, Lee may have been a moral man against slavery, but he fought on the side that supported it. One can have all the beliefs they wish, but if they don't take a stand on principal their good moral don't count for much.

The fact is that he was a general of a defeated nation.


36 posted on 01/19/2005 8:15:36 AM PST by mnehring (Fear leads to the Dark Side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to the DNC.)
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To: KMC1

Lee fought for Virginia. He was against secession and against slavery. I said this on another thread, but I think it bears repeating. Men had a loyalty to the states of their birth that most of us don't have now. He could not bring himself to betray Virginia by fighting against her.


37 posted on 01/19/2005 8:16:01 AM PST by SilentServiceCPOWife (Schni schna schnappi, schnappi, schnappi, schnapp!)
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To: Valin

Happy Birthday General Lee!

wish I was in the land of cotton...


38 posted on 01/19/2005 8:19:03 AM PST by kellynla (U.S.M.C. 1st Battalion,5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Div. Viet Nam 69&70 Semper Fi)
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To: mnehrling

"My goal is to save the union. If I can do it without freeing the slaves, I will. If I must free every slave to do it, I will." - Abraham Lincoln

"If this war was about slavery I would fight for the South." - Ulysses S. Grant

This war was not about slavery, even though your communist schools taught you so.


39 posted on 01/19/2005 8:19:06 AM PST by skutter
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To: SilentServiceCPOWife
In 1856, he wrote to his wife, "In this enlightened age, there are few I believe, but what will acknowledge, that slavery as an institution, is a moral and political evil in any Country."

In context, please. What Lee said was this:

"The views of the Pres: of the Systematic & progressive efforts of certain people of the North, to interfere with & change the domestic institutions of the South, are truthfully & faithfully expressed. The Consequences of their plans & purposes are also clearly set forth, & they must also be aware, that their object is both unlawful & entirely foreign to them & their duty; for which they are irresponsible & unaccountable; & Can only be accomplished by them through the agency of a Civil & Servile war. In this enlightened age, there are few I believe, but what will acknowledge, that slavery as an institution, is a moral & political evil in any Country. It is useless to expatiate on its disadvantages. I think it however a greater evil to the white man than to the black race, & while my feelings are strongly enlisted in behalf of the latter, my sympathies are more strong for the former. The blacks are immeasurably better off here than in Africa, morally, socially & physically. The painful discipline they are undergoing, is necessary for their instruction as a race, & I hope will prepare & lead them to better things. How long their subjugation may be necessary is known & ordered by a wise Merciful Providence. Their emancipation will sooner result from the mild & melting influence of Christianity, than the storms & tempests of fiery Controversy. This influence though slow, is sure. The doctrines & miracles of our Saviour have required nearly two thousand years, to Convert but a small part of the human race, & even among Christian nations, what gross errors still exist! While we see the Course of the final abolition of human Slavery is onward, & we give it the aid of our prayers & all justifiable means in our power, we must leave the progress as well as the result in his hands who sees the end; who Chooses to work by slow influences; & with whom two thousand years are but as a Single day. Although the Abolitionist must know this, & must See that he has neither the right or power of operating except by moral means & suasion, & if he means well to the slave, he must not Create angry feelings in the Master; that although he may not approve the mode which it pleases Providence to accomplish its purposes, the result will nevertheless be the same; that the reasons he gives for interference in what he has no Concern, holds good for every kind of interference with our neighbors when we disapprove their Conduct; Still I fear he will persevere in his evil Course. Is it not strange that the descendants of those pilgrim fathers who Crossed the Atlantic to preserve their own freedom of opinion, have always proved themselves intolerant of the Spiritual liberty of others?"

I have a sister who, while she believes abortion to be wrong and is something that she would never have, does not believe that government should be in a position to dictate what a woman should do with her body. She believes herself to be anti-abortion. Most other anti-abortion people I know would consider her pro-abortion.

And that is the position Lee seems to be taking in his letter. He says that he believes slavery is wrong and that he may pray for it's end. But by the same token he does not believe that it is the job of government or anyone else to actively work to end slavery. It is up to God to end it in his own time. So is Lee anti-slavery? He may believe he was but others would certainly disagree.

By the time Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, every slave in Lee’s charge had been freed.

When Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862 the slaves were still in Lee's charge. He emancipated them a day before the Emancipation Proclamation became effective on January 1, 1863.

Lee once urged Confederate president Jefferson Davis to emancipate all southern slaves and to allow "the use of… negroes as soldiers" to fight the Yankees. Davis rejected the plan.

Lee is not on record as endorsing a plan to enlist southern blacks as combat soldiers until after the confederate congress proposed legislation to that effect in December of 1864. In a January 1865 letter, Lee did support the enlistment of blacks, including slaves, and did support freedom for those slaves conscripted. But he began his letter by noting the following:

"Considering the relation of master and slave, controlled by humane laws and influenced by Christianity and an enlightened public sentiment, as the best that can exist between the white and black races while intermingled as at present in this country, I would deprecate any sudden disturbance of that relation unless it be necessary to avert a greater calamity to both. I should therefore prefer to rely upon our white population to preserve the ratio between our forces and those of the enemy, which experience has shown to be safe. But in view of the preparations of our enemies, it is our duty to provide for continued war and not for a battle or a campaign, and I fear that we cannot accomplish this without overtaxing the capacity of our white population."

It should also be noted that the legislation allowing for black combat troops, finally passed by the confederate congress in March 1865, did not require slaves be freed after their enlistment was over.

40 posted on 01/19/2005 8:24:24 AM PST by Non-Sequitur
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To: Valin

After 140 years there are still wounds that haven't healed and those that wave the bloody shirt are still with us. That we should never forget is good but it's more important that what we remember is true. Good and bad on all sides but men such as Robert E. Lee should be thought of in proper context of their times and by true measure of their spirit. He was one of the most vibrant men of the 19th century and for his memory and honor to be stained or tainted by ignorant remarks is not proper and something that falls beneath contempt.

Thanks for the reminder Valin.


41 posted on 01/19/2005 8:25:10 AM PST by Lee Heggy (For every complex problem, there is a solution that is simple, neat, and wrong. H.L. Mencken)
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To: mnehrling
Sure, Lee Bush may have been a moral man against slavery abortion, but he fought on the side that supported it. One can have all the beliefs they wish, but if they don't take a stand on principal their good moral don't count for much.

Welcome to the continuum of history. Now, you were saying?

42 posted on 01/19/2005 8:26:08 AM PST by LTCJ
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Comment #43 Removed by Moderator

To: skutter

Slavery in America

The first slaves arrived in Virginia around 1619, and slavery existed in America for the next 250 years. Africans made up the largest number of migrants to the New World during the colonial era, especially during the eighteenth century. During the four centuries of the Atlantic slave trade, an estimated 11 million Africans were transported to North and South America.

In the United States, slaves had no rights. According to the Constitution, a slave was considered three-fifths of a person--so every 5 slaves were counted as 3 people. A slave could be bought and sold just like a cow or horse. Slaves had no say in where they lived or who they worked for. They had no representation in government. Slaves could not own property and were not allowed to learn or be taught how to read and write.

Even the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 did not end slavery. Slavery continued in the states that were part of the Union forces. Slavery came to an end in 1865 when the 13th Amendment was ratified after the end of the Civil War.


44 posted on 01/19/2005 8:28:27 AM PST by Salamander (I'm just pining for the Fnords)
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To: Lee Heggy
After 140 years there are still wounds that haven't healed and those that wave the bloody shirt are still with us. That we should never forget is good but it's more important that what we remember is true. Good and bad on all sides but men such as Robert E. Lee should be thought of in proper context of their times and by true measure of their spirit. He was one of the most vibrant men of the 19th century and for his memory and honor to be stained or tainted by ignorant remarks is not proper and something that falls beneath contempt.

Amen, May God bless the memory of Gen. Robert E. Lee.

45 posted on 01/19/2005 8:30:02 AM PST by 4CJ (Laissez les bon FReeps rouler - Quo Gladius de Veritas)
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To: skutter
My goal is to save the union. If I can do it without freeing the slaves, I will. If I must free every slave to do it, I will." - Abraham Lincoln

Deliberately misquoting people does no honor to your cause. What Lincoln actually said, in context, was:

Executive Mansion,
Washington, August 22, 1862.

Hon. Horace Greeley:
Dear Sir.

I have just read yours of the 19th. addressed to myself through the New-York Tribune. If there be in it any statements, or assumptions of fact, which I may know to be erroneous, I do not, now and here, controvert them. If there be in it any inferences which I may believe to be falsely drawn, I do not now and here, argue against them. If there be perceptable [sic] in it an impatient and dictatorial tone, I waive it in deference to an old friend, whose heart I have always supposed to be right.

As to the policy I "seem to be pursuing" as you say, I have not meant to leave any one in doubt.

I would save the Union. I would save it the shortest way under the Constitution. The sooner the national authority can be restored; the nearer the Union will be "the Union as it was." If there be those who would not save the Union, unless they could at the same time save slavery, I do not agree with them. If there be those who would not save the Union unless they could at the same time destroy slavery, I do not agree with them. My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave I would do it, and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing some and leaving others alone I would also do that. What I do about slavery, and the colored race, I do because I believe it helps to save the Union; and what I forbear, I forbear because I do not believe it would help to save the Union. I shall do less whenever I shall believe what I am doing hurts the cause, and I shall do more whenever I shall believe doing more will help the cause. I shall try to correct errors when shown to be errors; and I shall adopt new views so fast as they shall appear to be true views.

I have here stated my purpose according to my view of official duty; and I intend no modification of my oft-expressed personal wish that all men everywhere could be free.

Yours,
A. Lincoln.

"If this war was about slavery I would fight for the South." - Ulysses S. Grant

I've seen this quote in several occasions, but never a date for it or the quote in context. I don't suppose you have that information, do you?

This war was not about slavery, even though your communist schools taught you so.

If this is an indication of your understanding of the times then it's easy to see where you come to that conclusion.

46 posted on 01/19/2005 8:31:08 AM PST by Non-Sequitur
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To: Valin

Lee-Jackson Day bump


47 posted on 01/19/2005 8:33:23 AM PST by ▀udda▀udd (7 days - 7 ways (but you must follow the instructions carefully))
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To: KMC1

He did a great thing at the end of the war by calling on Southerners to lay down their arms and not continue a bloody guerilla war.


48 posted on 01/19/2005 8:34:41 AM PST by DManA
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To: need_a_screen_name

Now I COULD be wrong, but I don't believe that's Robert E Lee. :-)


49 posted on 01/19/2005 8:35:55 AM PST by Valin (Sometimes you're the bug, and sometimes you're the windshield)
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To: cheif D

There's an old saying here that you're not a REAL FReeper until you've been flamed.


50 posted on 01/19/2005 8:38:15 AM PST by Valin (Sometimes you're the bug, and sometimes you're the windshield)
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