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Dog Has Record Litter Of 24 Puppies (With Pics! Awwww)
local6 ^ | today | staff

Posted on 01/21/2005 6:26:56 AM PST by Rodney King

A Neapolitan mastiff in Manea, United Kingdom, has broken a world record by giving birth to a litter of 24 mastiff puppies, according to a report.

Breeders Damian Ward and his girlfriend, Anne Kellegher, had only been expecting their two-year-old mastiff, Tia, to give birth to a maximum of 10 puppies after a scan from a local veterinarian.

When Tia grew so large she could barely move, the couple took the dog to the vets, who decided that an immediate caesarean was vital. Two hours later, Tia had given birth to the record 24 puppies.

Four of the puppies were too weak and died but the remaining 20 are thriving.

All but three of the pups are up for sale. They are worth more than $1,800 each.

Tia's achievement is now likely to set two records in the Guinness World Records -- the biggest litter and that of the most surviving puppies.

A Guinness World Records spokesman said the current record stands at 23.

Watch Local 6 News for more on this story.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: animals; awww; doggieping
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To: HairOfTheDog

We have rescued 3 Great Danes. It is a risky thing to do, because you can't be sure of the temperament of any rescue dog, nor know what health problems are lurking. It took us two years and a great deal of training before our sons could come in the house without being threatened by our last rescue.

Although he is now a sweet dog, I have resolved that our next Dane will be raised by me and come with health guarantees.


51 posted on 01/21/2005 8:05:45 AM PST by GrannyML
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To: Phantom Lord

She sounds sweet.

I am glad you chose to adopt her.

Maybe she came from a breeder who sold her to someone who did not care enough for her to keep her safe.


52 posted on 01/21/2005 8:06:54 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: AnAmericanMother

I agree with you.


53 posted on 01/21/2005 8:07:50 AM PST by HostileTerritory
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To: snarkytart
The lady who had her first got her as a gift from her boyfriend.

She came from a top notch breeder, has her papers, and is a beautiful specimen of her breed.

But she was neglected in many ways, and was badly hurt when hit by a car. Lack of nutrition and getting hit by a car really messed her up.

54 posted on 01/21/2005 8:08:58 AM PST by Phantom Lord (Advantages are taken, not handed out)
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Comment #55 Removed by Moderator

To: snarkytart

Oh, and her nickname among family and friends is "Devil Dog", though her real name is Maggie.


56 posted on 01/21/2005 8:09:39 AM PST by Phantom Lord (Advantages are taken, not handed out)
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To: GrannyML

You and others are proving my point.

There would be no need for all these dogs to be rescued and placed into other homes if breeders were not so greedy.
They bring many animals into this world and sell them to ANYONE with cash.


57 posted on 01/21/2005 8:09:43 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: Rodney King
OMG Wook at the wittle puppies wif their wrinkles and those big blue eyes!

That poor mamma dog, though.

58 posted on 01/21/2005 8:10:20 AM PST by Dooderbutt
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To: elfman2
There are no homeless mastiff puppies, just like there are no abandoned new cars littering the highways. Homeless animals are a problem, but stopping the breeding of mastiff puppies is no more the answer than stopping car production is the answer to abandoned cars.

Good point. I've seen people who grab animals for free or buy them cheap at a pound and the next month will get rid of it, and have a different pet.

59 posted on 01/21/2005 8:12:13 AM PST by Lijahsbubbe
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To: TontoKowalski

I think that lots of people know that "the pound" is an option, but that there's something of a stigma attached and it's not thought of as the best route to go. I really should not have gotten involved in a discussion about dogs, because I know little about them (we had a mutt when I was a kid that was terrier/poodle mix, really a hound from hell) and am not qualified to say anything about the importance of breeding. The pug was a bad choice for an example. They are very trendy in the Boston area, but I'm told it's because they make for good city dogs and have good personalities.

I do feel more strongly about this when it comes to cats. I think that getting a pedigreed cat when you don't intend to compete in shows is mixed up with misconceptions and fads and the search for the fluffiest, most doll-like cat you can get. Personality-wise, you're often worse off with a Siamese then you are with a domestic shorthair from the shelter. I have shelter cats that I got as kittens (an indulgence in itself). They both have soft, silky coats, one thicker than the other, and they have great personalities. Very affectionate.


60 posted on 01/21/2005 8:13:43 AM PST by HostileTerritory
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To: snarkytart
"The SPCA and most other shelters put dogs to sleep with behavior problems."

Shelters perform cookie-cutter behavior testing that is designed to uncover fear biters and garden variety aggression. They frequently miss the mark on phobias, certain types of problem shyness, house-breaking issues, destructive chewing and dominance problems. Not to mention failing to pick up on hearing and vision problems which can both lead to behavior problems.

I'm in and out of shelters all the time and I have a lot of respect for the workers and volunteers but they are often understaffed and under-trained and turn over is HIGH. Many shelters don't have the time or staff to work with a dog long enough to uncover these problems. If the dog looks okay, acts friendly with staff, has normal interactions with other dogs and is mostly quiet, this is often enough along with a brief temperament test.

Two weeks later the problems start to emerge. Adoption is great - 3 of my Shelties came out of rescue, 2 of them by way of shelters that shunted them on to kill list. It's just not the best option for everyone.

61 posted on 01/21/2005 8:14:37 AM PST by Gingersnap
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To: GrannyML
We have rescued 3 Great Danes. It is a risky thing to do, because you can't be sure of the temperament of any rescue dog

Well, you went after a large breed, and a fairly rare one at that. Of the many pet choices that are out there, you were looking for the right breed perhaps over the right temperament. I am sure there were more passive dogs at the pound the day you took yours home, ones that would not have threatened your sons. You chose a look over a temperament. That's fine, but not a good measure of the temperament of pound mutts. I just wouldn't overstate the risk is all. In fairness... it takes about two years before a pup from a breeder is to be completely trusted alone with your shoes. They all take time and work.

62 posted on 01/21/2005 8:15:34 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: Motherbear

Yes, I went too far in talking about dogs when I was thinking about cats.


63 posted on 01/21/2005 8:15:48 AM PST by HostileTerritory
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To: Phantom Lord

>>>>"Oh, and her nickname among family and friends is "Devil Dog", though her real name is Maggie<<<<

LOL

I have so many nicknames for my two dogs and my cat..most are along the lines of "devil" or "demon" or "wacky".


I love them all.

:^)


64 posted on 01/21/2005 8:15:55 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: snarkytart

Okay, I get your point, I think. But you appeared to condemn all breeders as irresponsible. Can you not concede that there is a role for poeple who are committed to improving dog breeds through selective breeding?


65 posted on 01/21/2005 8:18:13 AM PST by GrannyML
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To: Gingersnap
If the dog looks okay, acts friendly with staff, has normal interactions with other dogs and is mostly quiet, this is often enough along with a brief temperament test. Two weeks later the problems start to emerge. Adoption is great - 3 of my Shelties came out of rescue, 2 of them by way of shelters that shunted them on to kill list. It's just not the best option for everyone.

And training issues never happen with puppies? Good grief... as a rescuer yourself, you should be the last to set back the efforts of rescuers by overstating that some of them need trained. ALL PUPPIES NEED TRAINED, so telling people they'd be better off with some pedigreed pup ignores the fact that any new dog owner needs to be prepared to train the dog they select, and stick with it for a long time, not expect them to be Lassie out of the box.

66 posted on 01/21/2005 8:20:38 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: Gingersnap

Again..the reason those dogs have issues is because they were neglected.
Breeders IMO add to the shelter problem you are talking about by bringing dogs into this world and selling them to anyone with cash.

I doubt most breeders screen their buyers.

A lot of these animals wind up neglected and living in shelters.



67 posted on 01/21/2005 8:21:00 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: snarkytart

The VAST majority of animals who end up in shelters are NOT pure bred dogs from careful breeders - they're mixed breed puppies that are a result of people not bothering to neuter their animals. I think that's a far more important crusade where dogs are concerned. No need to tar all breeders with the same brush.


68 posted on 01/21/2005 8:21:09 AM PST by RosieCotton (A dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it. - GK Chesterton)
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To: HairOfTheDog

My husband and I spent several hours with this dog, watching him interact with the volunteers, other dogs, including our 2 dogs, and he was absolutely sweet. Who knew that he had been abused by a young man?


69 posted on 01/21/2005 8:21:51 AM PST by GrannyML
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To: snarkytart
There would be no need for all these dogs to be rescued and placed into other homes if breeders were not so greedy. They bring many animals into this world and sell them to ANYONE with cash.

But in your world, only the greedy people with the wrong motives would be breeding our future pets. What would happen to the gene pool over time in your world? There really are people out there who protect and refine the breeds that we all love. Good breeders are breeding for the consistent look and consistent stable personalities that make the dog such a great companion... even when through carelessness, some end up at the pound.

70 posted on 01/21/2005 8:25:13 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: snarkytart
Dog breeders suck!

Get this poor animal fixed .

That is the most ridiculous statement. Different breeds have very different useful purposes 99% of dog breeders love their specific breeds and breed them out of love. PC crap sucks.

71 posted on 01/21/2005 8:28:05 AM PST by Lady Heron
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To: Lady Heron

Love of money.


72 posted on 01/21/2005 8:29:48 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: HairOfTheDog

>>>But in your world, only the greedy people with the wrong motives would be breeding our future pets<<<

What?


73 posted on 01/21/2005 8:30:47 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: snarkytart
Breeders IMO add to the shelter problem you are talking about by bringing dogs into this world and selling them to anyone with cash. I doubt most breeders screen their buyers.

You've never been so micromanaged until you have tried to buy a dog from some breeders.

Really, I love your heart, but your perspective is all screwed up. You are going after selective breeders of valuable dogs as the problem when they aren't the source of all the dogs at the pound. Your neighbor who just neglects to spay or neuter hers is the problem.

74 posted on 01/21/2005 8:32:55 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: HairOfTheDog

Yes, and I go after my neighbor to that nelgets their dog, but this thread was about breeders so....


75 posted on 01/21/2005 8:34:12 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: HairOfTheDog
Your neighbor who just neglects to spay or neuter hers is the problem.

Exactly.

76 posted on 01/21/2005 8:34:37 AM PST by RosieCotton (A dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it. - GK Chesterton)
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To: snarkytart

"to" should be "too"


77 posted on 01/21/2005 8:35:17 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: snarkytart
What?

Think about it. You are saying there is NO use for purebred dog breeding at all and that all people who really care about dogs should never breed them. If you were right, then only the greedy and careless would be producing pups, and that is not the best gene pool to choose from is it?

78 posted on 01/21/2005 8:35:36 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: FastCoyote
Now if I could just get my girlfriend to litter like that.

While it is a questionable thought in any sense...if YOU are breeding, it should be with a WIFE....

79 posted on 01/21/2005 8:36:41 AM PST by paulat
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To: snarkytart
>Doggie world is way over populated as it is.<

If this is so true, how come shelters in the Boston area have resorted to importing pariah (feral) dogs from Puerto Rico to fill the demand for shelter pups?

There are breeds of dogs, like the Saluki, which have existed since the time before Christ. Are you saying, that because there are some irresponsible owners, mostly of unspayed mongrels (purebred dogs are not exactly filling the shelters), that people who love such breeds (or any breed) should have to watch them go extinct?

Lastly, this is a conservative forum. You want to impose your values on everyone. Why should people who want a huge dog or one that will mature to less than 10 pounds not be able to own what they want? Mutts are fine for people who want one, but those people who want a given breed of dog aren't going to depend on your approval, thank goodness.

There are good breeders, and bad ones. Don't paint all of them with the same brush.

80 posted on 01/21/2005 8:38:03 AM PST by Darnright
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To: snarkytart; HairOfTheDog
"I doubt most breeders screen their buyers."

Are you kidding? I could adopt a kid from China faster than I could buy a pup from a lot of breeders. Most breeders aren't in it for the money because there isn't any. Most do it for the love of the breed and are very careful people.

Hair - I know all dogs require training, that wasn't my point. Just that some behavior problems are beyond the skill level of many people. Every breeder I know will take back a pup or older dog that develops unusual behavior problems.

One of mine is deaf/partially blind but he sure doesn't look it. He got shuttled around a lot and became a biter. I taught him a touch code and he's a sweety now. Not everybody has the time and skill to work with a dog like that.

Again, I like shelters. I like adopting dogs. I like training dogs. I like volunteering. Guys, I'm on your side. But one size doesn't fit all. If my 84 year old MIL feels more comfortable with her ultra purebred, teeny teacup poodle than she would with a lab mix, it her call. There's room for both.

81 posted on 01/21/2005 8:39:00 AM PST by Gingersnap
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To: HairOfTheDog
No I believe I said that people who breed an animal just for cash and sell it to people without knowing anything about the people contribute to the over population, the mistreatment and the homelessness of dogs.
82 posted on 01/21/2005 8:39:37 AM PST by snarkytart
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To: HairOfTheDog
Hi Tonto... What kind did ya get?

Hi, Hair! I should've thought to ping you to this thread. I know it is of interest to you.

We got a Silky Terrier. A small long-haired dog that doesn't shed. He'll lose some hair in the brush, just like humans, but he doesn't leave it all over the place. His coat actually feels like human hair.

He's one of the "odorless" varieties. A bit of a misnomer... but it's not a really strong smell, and is beat down with regular baths.

He only comes up to about mid-shin, so the breed's on the small side, which is fine because he's an indoor dog. And, like my wife says, "Little dogs make little poop."

He's intelligent. My wife went with him to obedience school, and he's very well behaved. Can sit, lay down, fetch, stay, heel, beg... all the basics. He house trained very quickly.

He's an excellent watch dog. Obviously he's not going to take down a burgler, but I bet one doesn't sneak up on us either.

We love this dog, and learned about the breed on the AKC Website, which I highly recommend to anyone looking for a dog.

The downside was that he cost more than my first car, but we think he's worth ten times what we paid.

83 posted on 01/21/2005 8:41:09 AM PST by TontoKowalski
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To: SengirV
You are out of your ever lovin' mind. I've had three purebred dogs and one dog I saved from going to the pound. The one I saved, a German Shepherd, was the sweetest dog I've ever had. At six years old he got a German Shepherd disease, perianal fistulas. Antibiotics and about $4000 later, he died from this horrid disease.

I'd rather spend $1800 for a dog who was bred well. Thank you ever so much.

84 posted on 01/21/2005 8:45:55 AM PST by Slip18
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To: snarkytart
"DOGS wind up mistreated or homeless regardless of their breed or cost. "

Is that really a big issue with $1500 registered dogs? I saw the link, and it looks like the fostering organization is doing great things, but I can’t imagine that it’s more than one in a thousand dogs that are actually homeless (as in abandoned). If nothing else, a free add in a paper or a conversation with a few friends would get them at least a temporary home.

Sure, there’s always a few nuts who dump their pets in a fit of rage (and beat their kids in the next eruption) but I don’t think making fewer $1500 dogs available helps that measurably.

85 posted on 01/21/2005 8:46:25 AM PST by elfman2
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To: Jemian

Reminds me of an old joke.

Little girl was on the sidewalk with a box of young kittens and a sign saying "Democrat kittens for sale $5".
John Kerry walks by and says, " oh, isn't that cute."

The next week Kerry walks by the same little girl with the kittens, but this time the sign says, "Republican Kittens for sale $10". Kerry asks the little girl where the democrat kittens were from last week. The little girl explains and says "Oh, these are the same kittens, it's just that now they have their eyes open !"


86 posted on 01/21/2005 8:53:49 AM PST by OB1kNOb (WOODY: "Hey Mr. Peterson, there's a cold one waiting for you." NORM: " If she calls I'm not here.")
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To: snarkytart
No I believe I said that people who breed an animal just for cash and sell it to people without knowing anything about the people contribute to the over population, the mistreatment and the homelessness of dogs.

Do you know anything about this situation, other than that they had a remarkable litter that made the paper? Do you know anything about the supply and demand of Mastiffs in England or the quality of the parents of this litter? Are you ignoring all of our points and just arguing your extremely skewed perspective, reality be damned?

87 posted on 01/21/2005 8:56:42 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: TontoKowalski

Got any pictures of your pooch?


88 posted on 01/21/2005 8:59:41 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: HairOfTheDog

A ton, but I wouldn't have the first idea of how to get them on a website. I'm challenged in that way... if only I could be "protected class."


89 posted on 01/21/2005 9:09:48 AM PST by TontoKowalski
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To: TontoKowalski

Oh dear... That is just such a pitiful answer!


90 posted on 01/21/2005 9:11:08 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: elfman2

I agree that responsible breeders are not the problem. That said, there may not be homeless mastiff puppies, but there are plenty of homeless mastiff dogs -- too often original owners abandon them not for behavior problems, but instead simply when they find out how big they get and how much it costs to feed them.

We adopted a Rottweiler we found abandoned along the highway at a popular doggie-dumping spot (tried everything to find her first family, but couldn't). She's the sweetest, calmest, friendliest, most obedient dog we've ever met; she was clearly loved and well-socialized. We assume she just got too big for her original owners to handle (and they were too ignorant to give her to a breed-rescue program). If we hadn't been able to keep her, she would have ended up in a rescue program and would have made some Rottie lover very happy.


91 posted on 01/21/2005 9:18:36 AM PST by ellery (Concentrated power has always been the enemy of liberty. - Ronald Reagan)
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To: HairOfTheDog
Well, as a consolation prize, I will tell you the pup's name, and the story behind it.

We let our then-7-year-old son name him. He named him "Jango Spy." Jango is his "first name" and Spy is his "last name."

He liked the bounty hunter from Star Wars (or at least he thought it was a cool name) and he loved the movie Spy Kids.

We thought it was an odd name, but we dutifully registered him as "Jango Spy" and he's been "Jango" ever since. It suits him.

92 posted on 01/21/2005 9:19:02 AM PST by TontoKowalski
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To: SengirV

Well it extends to how people view adoption vs. artifical insemination... why are some people getting other people's frozen eggs and not adopting a baby? they both cost the same.


93 posted on 01/21/2005 9:22:29 AM PST by cyborg
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To: TontoKowalski
Jango is a good dog name.

Below (on the right) is a picture of the latest irresistable hard luck case to cross my path. We found him hanging out in the doorway of our corner convenience store on Christmas Eve. Very sweet old guy. No response to flyers we posted about him, no idea where he came from, but our Gidget the spotted dog adores him, and she doesn't usually like anybody ;~D.

We named him "Homer" because he needed a Home-er... but it also fits him. He's not real "deep".


94 posted on 01/21/2005 9:27:07 AM PST by HairOfTheDog
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To: ellery
"She's the sweetest, calmest, friendliest, most obedient dog we've ever met; she was clearly loved and well-socialized. We assume she just got too big for her original owners to handle (and they were too ignorant to give her to a breed-rescue program). "

Nice find!

But is even part of the solution to make these dogs even more rare as I mentioned in post #85?

95 posted on 01/21/2005 9:28:46 AM PST by elfman2
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To: snarkytart

I'll bet that in your free time you protest yeast, too.


96 posted on 01/21/2005 9:38:09 AM PST by Old Professer (When the fear of dying no longer obtains no act is unimaginable.)
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To: HairOfTheDog
You are one of the kindest people I know. That dog has such adoring eyes in the second photo.

A lot can be determined about people by how their dog looks at them.

I tease my wife by saying that the dog calls her "Beloved" because he is so devoted to her. I'll come home and he is thrilled to see me, lots of dancing around, wanting petting. But if my wife snaps her fingers, he'll abandon me in a heartbeat. Oh, well, I guess that's because she feeds him.

97 posted on 01/21/2005 9:40:54 AM PST by TontoKowalski
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To: Jemian

My dog's litter of ten had their eyes open and they were already barking and fighting each other at birth.


98 posted on 01/21/2005 9:42:32 AM PST by RightWhale (Please correct if cosmic balance requires.)
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To: snarkytart

In a lot of societies they put troublemakers to sleep regardless of species.


99 posted on 01/21/2005 9:44:14 AM PST by Old Professer (When the fear of dying no longer obtains no act is unimaginable.)
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To: Old Professer

Go away idiot.

As if I can not have an opinion other than yours.


100 posted on 01/21/2005 9:46:11 AM PST by snarkytart
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