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Tigers, snowmobiles, Sudafed: There oughta (not) be a law
Peoria Journal Star ^ | 23 January 2005 | Bill Winter

Posted on 01/24/2005 8:30:54 AM PST by longshadow

Tigers, snowmobiles, Sudafed: There oughta (not) be a law

Sunday, January 23, 2005

By Bill Winter

Here's the best legal advice you'll get in 2005: Don't let your pet tiger drive a snowmobile across a not-quite-frozen lake and then buy three packages of Sudafed at a drugstore. If you do, you'll get into hot water.

Which is defined as water that's at least 120 degrees. In Louisiana, anyway.

If that doesn't make any sense, you haven't been following news reports about all the state laws that went into effect on Jan. 1. That's right. Laws regulating pet tigers, snowmobiles, cold medicine, and hot water took effect on New Year's Day - along with hundreds of other laws in 19 states.

It's a tough call, but the most eye-rollingly foolish one may be Louisiana's "hot" water decree. According to politicians, Louisiana faced an ominous threat: the hot water in some laundromats wasn't hot enough. (I'll pause while you gasp in horror.) Some folks complained that their clothes weren't getting clean.

The solution? It's obvious, isn't it? Let the free market work. If customers aren't happy with the hot water at a laundromat, they'll find a better facility. Eventually, good laundromats with satisfactorily hot water will get more business and bad ones will go bankrupt. Right?

You must not be from Louisiana. The correct answer is: pass a new law. So they did. Now, every Louisiana laundromat is required to produce 120-degree water for its washing machines. If they don't, the owner must post a sign saying, "Hot water not available." Presumably, thermometer-wielding police will enforce the law, instead of wasting their time solving murders.

New Hampshire faced a different crisis. Bored by the approximately 11 months of winter they endure each year, some state residents were driving their snowmobiles at high speed across iced-over lakes and then "skimming" across patches of open water. For those who didn't drown, this was allegedly fun.

State politicians weren't amused. So they passed a law making skimming illegal. "The new law against skimming will save lives," a Fish and Game Department employee solemnly told the Concord Monitor. Sure it will. Because lunatics who ride snowmobiles over open water in frigid weather are exactly the kind of thoughtful citizens most likely to obey such laws.

Then there's the tiger problem. In 2003, a knucklehead living in a tiny Harlem apartment was hospitalized after his pet - a 400-pound Bengal tiger - gnawed his arm and leg. New York politicians, eager to solve a problem that occurs, on average, once in a lifetime, passed a law making it a crime to keep wild animals as pets. To put, ahem, teeth into the law, they levied a $500 fine for the first offense.

Consider the thinking: The possibility of having limbs chewed into human tartare by a tiger's razor-sharp teeth is not enough to prevent people from keeping savage jungle cats as pets. But a $500 fine - ah, that will do the trick.

Finally, there's cold medicine. In Illinois, it's now a crime to buy more than two packages of over-the-counter cold medication at a time. Such medicines (like Sudafed) contain pseudoephedrine, which, when combined with other chemicals and criminal intent, can produce methamphetamine. Since previous laws designed to stamp out "meth" hadn't succeeded, politicians figured that one more regulation would do the trick. And since those other laws, which targeted drug manufacturers and dealers, had failed, legislators cleverly turned their sights on people with colds, who now risk criminal charges if they try to stock up on medicine.

All this raises an obvious question. Why do politicians pass such foolish laws? That's easy. It's what politicians do. And American politicians do it more than almost anyone else.

Consider: on New Year's Day, 88 new laws went into effect in China, according to the Financial Express newspaper. That's China, which has 1.3 billion people. The totalitarian Communist nation. Where its rulers have traditionally controlled every aspect of citizen's lives. Yet, only 88 new laws were required to keep China functioning smoothly for another year.

By contrast, politicians in North Carolina last year passed 216 new laws. In Pennsylvania, lawmakers cranked out "nearly 240 bills," according to the Associated Press. In Louisiana, the Legislature enacted a whopping 930 new laws at its regular session - and then, realizing that the job wasn't quite done, passed 14 more at a special session. California politicians, not to be outdone, managed to pass "about 950 bills," according to the Sacramento Bee, before, presumably, collapsing from exhaustion. That's 2,350 new laws in just four states (leaving 46 other states where politicians were assuredly just as busy.)

What can be done? As a good American, my first thought was that we should pass a new law - making it illegal for politicians to pass so many new laws. Then I reconsidered. Because if the laws regulating pet tigers, snowmobiles, cold medicine, and hot water are any indication, new laws are not the solution. New laws are the problem.

Oops. Can I say that? Or is there a law against it? I better check.

Bill Winter is communications director for the Advocates for Self-Government, a Georgia-based, nonprofit, nonpartisan libertarian organization.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Government; Political Humor/Cartoons
KEYWORDS: bigbrother; dumblaws; govwatch; hopeidontgetacold; nannystate; stupidpoliticians
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"Festival of Lunatic Laws"
1 posted on 01/24/2005 8:30:54 AM PST by longshadow
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To: PatrickHenry; VadeRetro; general_re; Doctor Stochastic; RadioAstronomer; tpaine; ...

stupid politician tricks ping


2 posted on 01/24/2005 8:33:11 AM PST by longshadow
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To: longshadow
Denny Crane said no law, no court should stand in the way of my having a brain. He's right; but American legislatures think we're too stupid to make it through life without their benevolent oversight.

Denny Crane: "I look to two things: First to God and then to Fox News."

3 posted on 01/24/2005 8:34:21 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: longshadow

North Dakota has the cold medicine law too. It's ridiculous.


4 posted on 01/24/2005 8:36:05 AM PST by patricktschetter
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To: longshadow
In Illinois, it's now a crime to buy more than two packages of over-the-counter cold medication at a time. Such medicines (like Sudafed) contain pseudoephedrine, which, when combined with other chemicals and criminal intent, can produce methamphetamine.

I live in an Indiana county right across the Illinois boarder that also happens to have one of the highest rate of meth lab busts in the nation.

To prevent people from making meth, the County Commissioners enacted a law where if you buy Sudafed, your name and address are sent to the prosecutors office, where it remains on a list. Supposedly, this will prevent future meth labs.

5 posted on 01/24/2005 8:37:10 AM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: goldstategop
Denny Crane said no law, no court should stand in the way of my having a brain.

I, too, saw that last night; it was delightful.

6 posted on 01/24/2005 8:39:12 AM PST by longshadow
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To: Military family member

"Supposedly, this will prevent future meth labs."


Actually, Pfizer's release of a Sudafed that uses a different compound than pseudoephedrine will do the trick!


7 posted on 01/24/2005 8:42:46 AM PST by Blzbba (Don't hate the player - hate the game!)
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To: Military family member
To prevent people from making meth, the County Commissioners enacted a law where if you buy Sudafed, your name and address are sent to the prosecutors office, where it remains on a list. Supposedly, this will prevent future meth labs.

What's next? Shall we require names and addresses of every man who purchases a copy of "Playboy" and forward it to the prosecutors office to keep on file, because they have the "potential" to be rapists?

I really shoudn't say that out loud; the Authoritarian busy-bodies might actually think it is a good idea....

8 posted on 01/24/2005 8:43:30 AM PST by longshadow
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To: Blzbba

Actually, that's manufactured in the same county. We have a huge Pfizer facility here.


9 posted on 01/24/2005 8:44:11 AM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: longshadow

Apparently Oregon has the meds law too. I went into one of our local stores for Sudafed sinus meds and had to go to the pharmacist to get what I use to be able to pick up off the shelf. I didn't have to fill out any paperwork or give an address, but they did refuse to let me do any other shopping until I paid for it there.


10 posted on 01/24/2005 8:47:46 AM PST by xander
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To: longshadow
The other local law allows police to arrest anyone they suspect for manufacturing meth if they possess any one item used in that process.

I sold a brand new propane grill because I didn't want to give anyone a reason to bust me for something stupid. I'll stick to charcoal.

11 posted on 01/24/2005 8:49:01 AM PST by Military family member (Go Colts!)
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To: longshadow
Don't let a large family get a cold. You could go to jail buying meds.
12 posted on 01/24/2005 8:50:58 AM PST by DYngbld (I've read the back of the Book and guess what? .... We WIN!)
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To: longshadow
the hot water in some laundromats wasn't hot enough.

I thought modern detergents did not require hot water. We seldom, seldom ever was in hot water. I guess it doesn't matter. The state gets another item to make the practice of serving the public more difficult. We know who is really supposed to service the public.

13 posted on 01/24/2005 8:52:26 AM PST by oyez (¡Qué viva la revolución de Reagan!)
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To: Blzbba

So then they'll switch to phenylacetic acid, or make their own P2P. Then what? Pretty soon it'll be illegal to buy any solvents, all over the counter cold medicines, drain cleaners, etc. Then what?

If you've got a benzene ring as a starting point, you can make meth - given very little organic chemistry education. Ban that? That'll be quite the event: The DEA will outlaw knowledge. At least the Democrats won't have to worry - they don't have any of that.


14 posted on 01/24/2005 8:53:08 AM PST by datura (Destroy The UN, the MSM, and China. The rest will fall into line once we get rid of these.)
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To: xander
I didn't have to fill out any paperwork or give an address, but they did refuse to let me do any other shopping until I paid for it there.

Not to worry; the busy-bodies will implement the reporting requirements after they get their nose under the tent flap with less onerous legislation.

Left unfettered, politicians who dream up these sorts of laws will eventually require us to get a mother-may-I from Big Brother before we can buy sugar, because it can be used to bake cakes and cookies that cause dental decay and obesity.

It's so nice to know they're looking out for the welfare of us poor, helpless little creatures.....

15 posted on 01/24/2005 8:54:40 AM PST by longshadow
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To: datura
The DEA will outlaw knowledge.

Ahhhh! "Thought Crimes!"

That has a familiar ring to it..... hmmmm; where have I heard that term before.......

16 posted on 01/24/2005 8:57:04 AM PST by longshadow
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To: longshadow

Isn't it amazing what they can transform the Interstate Commerce Clause into? That thing mutates better than most virus strains.


17 posted on 01/24/2005 8:58:30 AM PST by datura (Destroy The UN, the MSM, and China. The rest will fall into line once we get rid of these.)
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To: oyez
I thought modern detergents did not require hot water.

Correct, but you don't think a little detail like that is going to stop a poltician who is bent of legislating away our liberty, do you?

18 posted on 01/24/2005 8:58:47 AM PST by longshadow
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To: datura

Given a benzene ring, one can stone the world?


19 posted on 01/24/2005 8:58:54 AM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: longshadow
Yes.

And applying that to women, their genitals should be licensed and registered since they have the potential to be prostitutes.

20 posted on 01/24/2005 9:00:01 AM PST by kahoutek
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To: goldstategop

I am out of the loop here - who is Denny Crane?


21 posted on 01/24/2005 9:00:26 AM PST by day10 (Rules cannot substitute for character.)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Or at least give it cancer. Oh wait, we have politicians we actually pay to act as cancers. Never mind.


22 posted on 01/24/2005 9:00:42 AM PST by datura (Destroy The UN, the MSM, and China. The rest will fall into line once we get rid of these.)
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To: kahoutek
And applying that to women, their genitals should be licensed and registered since they have the potential to be prostitutes.

Wow; you're thinking just like a politician! Are you SURE you're not a member of the Louisiana Legislature?

;-)

23 posted on 01/24/2005 9:02:36 AM PST by longshadow
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Comment #24 Removed by Moderator

To: goldstategop
He's right; but American legislatures think we're too stupid to make it through life without their benevolent oversight.

Sad, isn't it?

25 posted on 01/24/2005 9:02:45 AM PST by Gabz (Anti-smoker gnatzies...small minds buzzing in your business..............SWAT'EM)
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To: Military family member
I'll stick to charcoal.

Good thing you don't live in Southern California, where charcoal grills are verboten...

26 posted on 01/24/2005 9:04:25 AM PST by gridlock (ELIMINATE PERVERSE INCENTIVES)
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To: datura

Don't be crabby.


27 posted on 01/24/2005 9:05:21 AM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: bullseye876
Perhaps there should be a cap on the total number of federal and state laws so that these folks would have to go through the old ones and throw out the ones that are obsolete.

I like your idea.

But the act of proposing it clearly disqualifies you from being a member of an "enlightened" legislature yearning to coddle the soiled masses from cradle to grave....

28 posted on 01/24/2005 9:06:31 AM PST by longshadow
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To: Doctor Stochastic
Don't be crabby.

I'm sorry, but unless you are duly licensed by the state to practice Astrology, it is forbidden for you yo make astrological allusion on the internet. Someone could get hurt, you know!

< /Lunatic legislator mode>

29 posted on 01/24/2005 9:11:03 AM PST by longshadow
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To: patricktschetter
North Dakota has the cold medicine law too. It's ridiculous.

So does georgia. This one not the ex-Soviet one.

30 posted on 01/24/2005 9:11:10 AM PST by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy, and Bush is no conservative)
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To: longshadow
What can be done? As a good American, my first thought was that we should pass a new law - making it illegal for politicians to pass so many new laws......

I'd vote for that.

Then again, how about a new law making politicians illegal. lol
I'd vote for that too.

31 posted on 01/24/2005 9:13:09 AM PST by Fiddlstix (This Tagline for sale. (Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: longshadow

The solution is to put a per-word tax on legislation, to be paid by the legislators. A bill passes the House? That will be $439.07, from every member.


32 posted on 01/24/2005 9:16:26 AM PST by Fudd (Never confuse a liberal with facts.)
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To: day10
who is Denny Crane?

I hear he was a sniper in the Marines...

Or was it a pilot?

PULL!

33 posted on 01/24/2005 9:19:57 AM PST by Fudd (Never confuse a liberal with facts.)
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To: longshadow
In Illinois, it's now a crime to buy more than two packages of over-the-counter cold medication at a time.

Arkansas and Oklahoma have similar idiocy. Cold meds are required to be kept behind the counter or in the storage room. Signs are posted to 'ask clerk' for them. By the time I get to the checkout, I've forgotten to ask. Ironically, I don't think the drug stores or pharmacy sections of stores are required to keep them under lock and key.
34 posted on 01/24/2005 9:32:19 AM PST by TomGuy (America: Best friend or worst enemy. Choose wisely.)
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To: longshadow
THE INDIANA PI LAW.
35 posted on 01/24/2005 9:40:19 AM PST by PatrickHenry (<-- Click on my name. The List-O-Links for evolution threads is at my freeper homepage.)
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To: longshadow
Lawmakers or government workers justifying their existence.
36 posted on 01/24/2005 9:49:39 AM PST by vetvetdoug (In memory of T/Sgt. Secundino "Dean" Baldonado, Jarales, NM-KIA Bien Hoa AFB, RVN 1965)
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To: longshadow
Bach would have been in trouble.
37 posted on 01/24/2005 9:53:07 AM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: DYngbld

I have a hard time with the cold medicine law in CA. My 3 boys' ages necessitate the purchase of 3 different strengths of cold medicine, so when they all get colds I am prohibited from buying multiples of the 3 kinds of the medicine I want. (I do like to buy in bulk--their colds can last for 10 days easy!)

What I do is pick several different strengths of several different brands and take them all to the counter, hoping that I can patch together some combination that will pass muster. So the cashier takes away what I'm prohibited from buying.

The whole thing is pretty sad for a non-communist country.


38 posted on 01/24/2005 9:56:29 AM PST by olivia3boys
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To: TomGuy
Perhaps if Tulia had these laws, this sort of thing wouldn' happen.

What's with these Panhandle names? (Tula Ellice Finklea for example.)

39 posted on 01/24/2005 9:58:50 AM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: longshadow

Can I also complain about toilet laws?

When I'm pregnant my BMs get, um, really big and bulky--something about the digestive system slowing down.

Yesterday it took me THREE flushes, not two, to do my business without stopping up the toilet.


40 posted on 01/24/2005 9:59:22 AM PST by olivia3boys
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To: olivia3boys
The wife and I have had to go through different lines at the store so we can get the required meds. Ours are 4,5,6,and 9 so we too need the different sizes. Such a pain.
41 posted on 01/24/2005 10:00:20 AM PST by DYngbld (I've read the back of the Book and guess what? .... We WIN!)
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To: longshadow

This is what I've been saying for a long time and it is the reason that Congressional sessions and State Legislatures should be limited to about 6 months every other year. We don't need these fools in session year-round passing pointless, stupid, foolish and unenforceable laws.


42 posted on 01/24/2005 10:13:03 AM PST by DustyMoment (Repeal CFR NOW!!)
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To: DYngbld
The wife and I have had to go through different lines at the store so we can get the required meds. Ours are 4,5,6,and 9 so we too need the different sizes. Such a pain.

Please be careful; some overzealous cop or prosecutor might construe that as conspiracy to violate the provisions of the Cold Med law.

See what a slippery slope this stuff is?

43 posted on 01/24/2005 10:15:56 AM PST by longshadow
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To: PatrickHenry
THE INDIANA PI LAW.

The only thing that seems to have changed is the invasiveness of the lunatic legislation. A century ago they were content to meddle with Mathematical constants; today, they insist of legislating how much water our toilets flush, what animals we can keep as pets, the temperature of the water in a commercial laundromat, and how many over-the-counter cold tablets we can buy at one time.

I swear these politicians will not be satisfied until they can rule the way the guerrilla leader in Woody Allen's "Bananas" did when he became dictator of some fictitious South American sh*thole:

"Henceforth, citizens will be required to change their underwear every day. To make it easier for the government to assure compliance, everyone is required to wear their underwear on the outside of their clothes..."

44 posted on 01/24/2005 10:26:06 AM PST by longshadow
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To: longshadow
The store will sell ten cans of spray paint to a stoned teenager at 11PM, but won't sell a 35 year old father of four three bottles of children's cold medicine. Hmmmm
45 posted on 01/24/2005 10:26:34 AM PST by DYngbld (I've read the back of the Book and guess what? .... We WIN!)
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To: DustyMoment
We don't need these fools in session year-round passing pointless, stupid, foolish and unenforceable laws.

"Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely."

46 posted on 01/24/2005 10:27:52 AM PST by longshadow
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To: longshadow

That stupid cold medicine law in PA is costing me time and money. Both my hubby and I have chronic allergies and sinus problems. We need daytime, non-drowsy sinus meds, nighttime sinus meds, and over-the-counter Claritin. All of these only come in boxes of 24 at the Target where I shop. Now, I have to buy two boxes at Target, then drive across town to buy the remainder at a more expensive drug store.

Last time I was prohibited from buying the legal products we need at Target, I mentioned to the cashier that this wasn't stopping meth dealers -- just costing law-abiding citizens. She tried to give me a line that the ban was not about meth, but about little kids, who might take too much cold medicine. Un-xxx-believable.


47 posted on 01/24/2005 10:28:53 AM PST by ellery (Concentrated power has always been the enemy of liberty. - Ronald Reagan)
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To: longshadow
Tennessee Anti-Evolution Statute (in 1925, and its repeal in 1967, a mere 42 years later).
48 posted on 01/24/2005 10:34:53 AM PST by PatrickHenry (<-- Click on my name. The List-O-Links for evolution threads is at my freeper homepage.)
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To: longshadow
"Henceforth, citizens will be required to change their underwear every day. To make it easier for the government to assure compliance, everyone is required to wear their underwear on the outside of their clothes..."

So that was what that Madonna thing was all about.

49 posted on 01/24/2005 10:41:22 AM PST by oyez (¡Qué viva la revolución de Reagan!)
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To: PatrickHenry
Tennessee Anti-Evolution Statute (in 1925, and its repeal in 1967, a mere 42 years later).

Oh, man! Unbelieveable.

What's next? Government-mandated stickers inside textbooks warning impressionable children to beware of the big Science Boogeyman?

;-)

50 posted on 01/24/2005 10:49:17 AM PST by longshadow
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