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To: DoctorZIn

I believe some did, every anchor or channel has fans. But if you want to know the youths' idea on him, I can tell you that he is not a very likeable figure in Iran among students or youngsters. He was loved among exiled Iranians in LA or the US. And some old generation guys (over age of 55 liked him a lot).

I believe, the Iranian youths need education on the values of freedom and democracy. The LA based TV stations should be like classes for the people inside of Iran. I have never seen those channels trying to teach some thing good to the Iranian people. All they use is coarse language against any one who is against them.


48 posted on 02/03/2005 4:13:33 PM PST by Khashayar (We are the champions, No time to lose us!)
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To: All

European Union Foreign and Security Policy representative Javier Solana, right, talks with Iran's Vice-President and head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation Gholamreza Aghazadeh in Solana's office at the European Council headquarters in Brussels, Tuesday Feb. 1, 2005. Iran has suspended enrichment activities _ which can produce both nuclear fuel and the core of atomic weapons _ during the talks, but has repeatedly insisted the freeze will be of short duration. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)

Iran has the military might to deter attacks against it, Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani said, after President George W. Bush said he would not rule out military force against Iran over its nuclear program. 'We are able to say that we have strength such that no country can attack us because they do not have precise information about our military capabilities due to our ability to implement flexible strategies,' the semi-official Mehr news agency quoted Shamkhani as saying on January 18, 2005. Iran's Shahab-3 missile is seen in this September 21 file photo. Photo by Morteza Nikoubazl/Reuters

Workmen wearing protective clothing walk away from the Russian-built Bushehr nuclear power reactor under construction in southwestern Iran during an organized media visit to the plant on March 11, 2003. President Bush said on Monday he would not rule out military action against Iran if that country was not more forthcoming about its suspected nuclear weapons program. Photo by Morteza Nikoubazl/Reuters

The United States has rebuffed pleas to join a European diplomatic drive to persuade Iran to give up any ambitions to add nuclear bombs to its arsenal, U.S. officials and foreign diplomats say. For months, Britain, France and Germany have hoped to improve their bargaining power with the Islamic republic by involving Washington in a proposed accord over an end to its uranium enrichment activities. This September 16, 2002 satellite image shows facilities in Natanz, Iran believed to be part of a previously unknown segment of Iran's nuclear program. Photo by Isis, Digitalglobe/Reuters


49 posted on 02/03/2005 4:44:13 PM PST by Khashayar (We are the champions, No time to lose us!)
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