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Victor Davis Hanson: The Global Throng, Why the world’s elites gnash their teeth
NRO ^ | February 04, 2005 | Victor Davis Hanson

Posted on 02/04/2005 5:35:02 AM PST by Tolik

Is anyone even listening to leftist elites?

Do we even remember "all that" now? The lunacy that appeared after 9/11 that asked us to look for the "root causes" to explain why America may have "provoked" spoiled mama's boys like bin Laden and Mohammed Atta to murder Americans at work? Do we recall the successive litany of "you cannot win in Afghanistan/you cannot reconstruct such a mess/you cannot jumpstart democracy there"? And do we have memory still of "Sharon the war criminal," and "the apartheid wall," and, of course, "Jeningrad," the supposed Israeli-engineered Stalingrad — or was it really Leningrad? Or try to remember Arafat in his Ramallah bunker talking to international groupies who flew in to hear the old killer's jumbled mishmash about George Bush, the meanie who had ostracized him.

Then we were told that if we dared invade the ancient caliphate, Saddam would kill thousands and exile millions more. And when he was captured in a cesspool, the invective continued during the hard reconstruction that oil, Halliburton, the Jews, the neocons, Richard Perle, and other likely suspects had suckered us into a "quagmire" or was it now "Vietnam redux"? And recall that in response we were supposed to flee, or was it to trisect Iraq? The elections, remember, would not work — or were held too soon or too late. And give the old minotaur Senator Kennedy his due, as he lumbered out on the eve of the Iraqi voting to hector about its failure and call for withdrawal — one last hurrah that might yet rescue the cherished myth that the United States had created another Vietnam and needed his sort of deliverance.

And then there was the parade of heroes who were media upstarts of the hour — the brilliant Hans Blixes, Joe Wilsons, Anonymouses, and Richard Clarkes — who came, wrote their books, did their fawning interviews on 60 Minutes, Nightline, and Larry King, and then faded to become footnotes to our collective pessimism.

Do not dare forget our Hollywood elite. At some point since 9/11, Michael Moore, Sean Penn, Meryl Streep, Jessica Lange, Whoopi Goldberg, and a host of others have lectured the world that their America is either misled, stupid, evil, or insane, bereft of the wisdom of Hollywood's legions of college drop-outs, recovering bad boys, and self-praised autodidacts.

Remember the twisted logic of the global throng as well: Anyone who quit the CIA was a genius in his renegade prognostication; anyone who stayed was a toady who botched the war. Three- and four-star generals who went on television or ran for office were principled dissidents who "told the truth"; officers in the field who kept quiet and saved Afghanistan and Iraq were "muzzled" careerists. Families of the 9/11 victims who publicly trashed George Bush offered the nation "grassroots" cries of the heart; the far greater number who supported the war on terror were perhaps "warped" by their grief.

There were always the untold "minor" embarrassments that we were to ignore as the slight slips of the "good" people — small details like the multibillion-dollar Oil-for-Food scandal that came to light due to the reporting of a single brave maverick, Claudia Rosett, or Rathergate, disclosed by "pajama"-clad bloggers without journalism degrees from Columbia, sojourns at the Kennedy School, or internships with the Washington Post. To put it into Animal Farm speak: elite New York Times, CBS News, and PBS good; populist bloggers, talk-radio, and cable news bad.

In place of Harry Truman and JFK we got John Kerry calling the once-maimed Prime Minister Allawi a "puppet," Senator Murray praising bin Laden's social-welfare work, Senator Boxer calling Secretary of State Rice a veritable liar for agreeing with the various casus belli that Boxer's own Senate colleagues had themselves passed in October 2002. And for emotional and financial support, the Democratic insiders turned to George Soros and Michael Moore, who assured them that their president was either Hitlerian, a dunce, or a deserter.

Then there was our media's hysteria: Donald Rumsfeld should be sacked in the midst of war; Abu Ghraib was the moral equivalent of everything from Saddam's gulag to the Holocaust; the U.S. military purportedly tried to kill reporters; and always the unwillingness or inability to condemn the beheaders, fascists, and suicide murderers, who sought to destroy any shred of liberalism. Meanwhile, the isolation of a corrupt Arafat, the withdrawal of 10,000 Americans from a Wahhabi theocracy, the transformation of the world's far-right monstrosities into reformed democracies, and the pull-back of some troops from Germany and the DMZ went unnoticed.

What explains this automatic censure of the United States, Israel, and to a lesser extent the Anglo-democracies of the United Kingdom and Australia? Westernization, coupled with globalization, has created an affluent and leisured elite that now gravitates to universities, the media, bureaucracies, and world organizations, all places where wealth is not created, but analyzed, critiqued, and lavishly spent.

Thus we now expect that the New York Times, Harper's, Le Monde, U.N. functionaries who call us "stingy," French diplomats, American writers and actors will all (1) live a pretty privileged life; (2) in recompense "feel" pretty worried and guilty about it; (3) somehow connect their unease over their comfort with a pathology of the world's hyperpower, the United States; and (4) thus be willing to risk their elite status, power, or wealth by very brave acts such as writing anguished essays, giving pained interviews, issuing apologetic communiqués, braving the rails to Davos, and barking off-the-cuff furious remarks about their angst over themes (1) through (3) above. What a sad contrast they make with far better Iraqis dancing in the street to celebrate their voting.

There is something else to this shrillness of the global throng besides the obvious fact of hypocrisy — that very few of the world's Westernized cynical echelon ever move to the ghetto to tutor those they champion in the abstract, reside in central Africa to feed the poor, give up tenure to ensure employment for the exploited lecturer, or pass on the Washington or New York A-list party to eat in the lunch hall with the unwashed. Davos after all, is not quite central Bolivia or the Sudan.

First, there is a tremendous sense of impotence. Somehow sharp looks alone, clever repartee, long lists of books read and articles cited, or global travel do not automatically result in commensurate power. So what exactly is wrong with these stupid people of Nebraska who would elect a dense, Christian-like George Bush when a Gore Vidal, George Soros, Ben Affleck, Bruce Springsteen, or Ted Kennedy warned them not to?

If the American Left is furious over the loss of most of the nation's governorships and legislatures, the U.S. House, the Senate, the presidency, and soon the Supreme Court, the Europeans themselves are furious over America's power — as if Red America is to Blue America as America is to Europe itself. Thus how can a mongrel culture of Taco Bell, Bud Light, and Desperate Housewives project such military and political influence abroad when the soft, subtle triangulation of far more cultured diplomats and sophisticated intellectuals from France, Germany, and Scandinavia is ignored by thugs from Iran, North Korea, and most of the Middle East?

Why would the world listen to a stumbling George Bush when it could be mesmerized by a poet, biographer, aristocrat, and metrosexual of the caliber of a Monsieur Dominique de Villepin? Why praise brave Iraqis lining up to vote, while at the same hour the defeated John Kerry somberly intones on Tim Russert's show that he really did go into Cambodia to supply arms to the mass-murdering Khmer Rouge — a statement that either cannot be true or is almost an admission of being a party to crimes against humanity if it is.

Second, political powerlessness follows from ideological exhaustion. Communism and Marxism are dead. Stalin and Mao killed over 80 million and did not make omelets despite the broken eggs. Castro and North Korea are not classless utopias but thugocracies run by megalomaniac dictators who the world prays will die any minute. The global Left knows that the Cold War is over and was lost by the Left, and that Eastern Europeans and Central Americans probably cherish the memory of a Ronald Reagan far more than that of a Francois Mitterrand or Willy Brandt.

But it is still more disheartening than that. In the 1960s and 1970s we were told that free-market America was becoming an anachronism. Remember Japan, Inc., whose amalgam of "Asian Values" and Western capitalism presaged the decline of the United States? Europeanists still assured us that a 35-hour work week, cradle-to-grave entitlement, and secularism were to be the only workable Western paradigms — before high unemployment, low growth, stagnant worker productivity, unassimilated minorities, declining birthrates, and disarmament suggested that just maybe something is going very wrong in a continent that is not so eager for either God or children.

Perhaps the result of this frustration is that European intellectuals damn the United States for action in Iraq, but lament that they could do nothing in the Balkans. Democrats at home talk of the need for idealism abroad, but fear the dirty road of war that sometimes is part of that bargain — thus the retreat into "democracy is good, BUT..." So here we have the global throng that focuses on one purported American crime to the next, as it simmers in the luxury of its privilege, education, and sophistication — and exhibits little power, new ideas, intellectual seriousness, or relevance.

In this context, the Iraqi elections were surely poorly attended, or illegitimate, or ruined by violence, or irrelevant, or staged by America — or almost anything other than a result of a brave, very risky, and costly effort by the United States military to destroy a fascist regime and offer something better in its place.

Yet as Yeehah! Howard Dean takes over the Democratic party, as Kojo Annan's dad limps to the end of his tenure, and as a Saddam-trading Jacques Chirac talks grandly of global airfare taxes to help the poor, they should all ask themselves whether a weary public is listening any longer to the hyped and canned stories of their own courage and brilliance.

Victor Davis Hanson is a military historian and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. His website is victorhanson.com


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: left; vdh; victordavishanson
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1 posted on 02/04/2005 5:35:02 AM PST by Tolik
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To: seamole; Lando Lincoln; quidnunc; .cnI redruM; yonif; SJackson; dennisw; monkeyshine; Alouette; ...


    Victor Davis Hanson Ping ! 

       Let me know if you want in or out

2 posted on 02/04/2005 5:35:44 AM PST by Tolik
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To: Tolik

BTTT


3 posted on 02/04/2005 5:38:58 AM PST by kellynla (U.S.M.C. 1st Battalion,5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Div. Viet Nam 69&70 Semper Fi)
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To: Tolik

I look forward to his column every week.


4 posted on 02/04/2005 5:43:30 AM PST by mainepatsfan
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To: Tolik

This is as close to a perfect venting as I can imagine.


5 posted on 02/04/2005 5:46:30 AM PST by Dilbert56
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To: Tolik

ping


6 posted on 02/04/2005 5:48:14 AM PST by Oratam
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To: Tolik

Wow, pretty powerful stuff. And so true!


7 posted on 02/04/2005 5:48:59 AM PST by Sender (Team Infidel USA)
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To: Tolik

VDH is the man.


8 posted on 02/04/2005 5:50:51 AM PST by Cruz
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To: Tolik
all places where wealth is not created, but analyzed, critiqued, and lavishly spent

That pretty much sums it up. We had our own problems pre-911 where certain agency people spent their careers at those lavish places and ended up getting sucked down the drain there while Atta was busy plotting next door. I don't think that's much of a problem anymore though.

9 posted on 02/04/2005 5:51:00 AM PST by palmer ("Oh you heartless gloaters")
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To: Tolik
Why praise brave Iraqis lining up to vote, while at the same hour the defeated John Kerry somberly intones on Tim Russert's show that he really did go into Cambodia to supply arms to the mass-murdering Khmer Rouge — a statement that either cannot be true or is almost an admission of being a party to crimes against humanity if it is.
There it is. Where's the follow up from the MSM .... hmmmmm?
10 posted on 02/04/2005 5:53:55 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67- '68)
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To: Tolik

If I may quote the from the Guinness commercial...BRILLIANT!!


11 posted on 02/04/2005 5:54:42 AM PST by ladtx ( "Remember your regiment and follow your officers." Captain Charles May, 2d Dragoons, 9 May 1846)
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To: Tolik
The global Left knows that the Cold War is over and was lost by the Left, and that Eastern Europeans and Central Americans probably cherish the memory of a Ronald Reagan far more than that of a Francois Mitterrand or Willy Brandt.

Victor Davis Hanson is just the best. Strips the facade right off the crumbling, stumbling leftist cabal.

Jacques Chirac and Schroeder have made fewer silly, pompous pronouncements about the utter stupidity of George Bush lately. When they do, I soothe my anger by imagining the legacy each will have even twenty years down the road, let alone fifty. I believe Dick Cheney will have a larger legacy in fifty years than Jacques Chirac.

12 posted on 02/04/2005 5:55:55 AM PST by JustaCowgirl (You have seen that life is fragile, and evil is real, and courage triumphs -- George W Bush)
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To: Tolik

And yet one more point about the self-crowned 'elites': they are out of touch with reality, living as they do in their ivory tower world. They deam and fantacize and create theories based on their dreams and fantasies while real people live in the real world and deal everyday with real problems, consequences of actions, etc.


13 posted on 02/04/2005 5:56:08 AM PST by Lindykim
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To: Tolik

Bump for later read.


14 posted on 02/04/2005 5:57:38 AM PST by Rummyfan
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To: Tolik

Super article. I love this man's writing. He can cut the crap and get down to brass tacks better than most.


15 posted on 02/04/2005 5:59:39 AM PST by el_texicano (Liberals are the real Mind-Numbed Robots - No Brains, No Guts, No Character...Just hate)
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To: Tolik
add me in. This is brilliant!
16 posted on 02/04/2005 5:59:53 AM PST by bill1952 ("All that we do is done with an eye towards something else.")
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To: Tolik

So there!


17 posted on 02/04/2005 6:00:45 AM PST by SMARTY ("Stay together, pay the soldiers and forget everything else." Lucius Septimus Severus to his sons)
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To: bill1952

Yep. Added to the VDH ping list.


18 posted on 02/04/2005 6:02:31 AM PST by Tolik
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To: Tolik
So what exactly is wrong with these stupid people of Nebraska who would elect a dense, Christian-like George Bush when a Gore Vidal, George Soros, Ben Affleck, Bruce Springsteen, or Ted Kennedy warned them not to?

Maybe because thanks to the internet and Jim Robinson, even the most humble tradesman now has access to great writing from VDH and enough other keen analysts to look beyond the partisan carping and make up their own damn minds.

19 posted on 02/04/2005 6:03:22 AM PST by metesky ("Brethren, leave us go amongst them." Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond- The Searchers)
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To: Tolik

Another keeper from one of the most brilliant minds among us today.


20 posted on 02/04/2005 6:03:40 AM PST by Bahbah
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To: Tolik

BTTT


21 posted on 02/04/2005 6:13:05 AM PST by freeangel ( (free speech is only good until someone else doesn't like what you say))
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To: Tolik

VDH has as usual an analysis based on 1) personal experience with reality i.e. running a farm, rather than pure theory
and 2) placing problems into the context of history rather than trendier than thou analyses.

He always cheers me up...wish I could write like that!


22 posted on 02/04/2005 6:35:09 AM PST by LadyDoc (liberals only love politically correct poor people)
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To: Tolik
As usual, a well-written piece. It is a bit of a rant, but an exultant one, and after the hard words that the left has thrown for so long, it felt good to read.

If the American Left is furious over the loss of most of the nation's governorships and legislatures, the U.S. House, the Senate, the presidency, and soon the Supreme Court, the Europeans themselves are furious over America's power — as if Red America is to Blue America as America is to Europe itself. Thus how can a mongrel culture of Taco Bell, Bud Light, and Desperate Housewives project such military and political influence abroad when the soft, subtle triangulation of far more cultured diplomats and sophisticated intellectuals from France, Germany, and Scandinavia is ignored by thugs from Iran, North Korea, and most of the Middle East?

I am sure that Dr. Hanson is aware that we are no more a "Taco Bell" culture than the Japanese are a ramen-shop culture. They are places of convenience that fit our cultural ways, but they are not our culture -- it is something that we and Japan have been very successful at, finding commercial means that aren't so much cultural indicators but the handiwork from Taylor through Deming to efficiently provide one of the necessities of life in an efficient and culturally workable context. They eschew elegance for speedy and efficient food consumption. But we don't reserve a table at either for meals with more cultural significance -- no one expects a wedding reception to be held at an adjacent McDonald's.

Bud Light on the other hand is a sign of cultural decay. ;-)

23 posted on 02/04/2005 6:44:53 AM PST by snowsislander
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To: Tolik

Aw, shoot. I thought the headline said "global thong."


24 posted on 02/04/2005 6:46:08 AM PST by r9etb
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To: Tolik
...very few of the world's Westernized cynical echelon ever ...pass on the Washington or New York A-list party....

I'll bet VDH is never invited to those parties....;^)

25 posted on 02/04/2005 6:53:00 AM PST by randog (What the....?!)
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To: Tolik

This should be printed out and sent to everynews outlet in the United States!


26 posted on 02/04/2005 6:56:33 AM PST by claudiustg (Go Sharon! Go Bush!)
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To: Tolik

I am truly thankful we have brilliant minds like VDH watching over our republic. It makes it so much easier to sleep at night.


27 posted on 02/04/2005 6:58:42 AM PST by PLOM...NOT!
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To: Tolik

Please add me to the VDH ping list. The guy ought to be put on National Security adviser senior staff (versus a freelancer he is now). His clarity is refreshing.


28 posted on 02/04/2005 7:01:40 AM PST by GSlob
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To: GSlob

As you could have guessed, I totally agree. He is listened to, thats for sure. But it would be reassuring to see him in an official adviser role.

Added to the VDH ping list.


29 posted on 02/04/2005 7:06:02 AM PST by Tolik
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To: metesky

'Humble tradesmen' internet brotherhood bump!

Morning, George! ;^)


30 posted on 02/04/2005 7:24:30 AM PST by headsonpikes (Spirit of '76 bttt!)
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To: Tolik

The Global Thong!


31 posted on 02/04/2005 7:27:09 AM PST by Valin (Sometimes you're the bug, and sometimes you're the windshield)
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To: Tolik

It's a question I've asked before, "When was the last time the political left was correct on any of the big questions?
I have a hard time thinking of one. The civil rights movement in the 60's?


32 posted on 02/04/2005 7:33:14 AM PST by Valin (Sometimes you're the bug, and sometimes you're the windshield)
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To: metesky

Tipping the Blogosphere
http://www.evangelicaloutpost.com/archives/001099.html
A Review of Hugh Hewitt’s Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation

Why is it that some ideas or behaviors or products start epidemics and others don’t? That’s the question that Malcom Gladwell attempts to answer in The Tipping Point, a fascinating examination of the phenomena of social epidemics. While examining the question Gladwell introduces three types of people -- Mavens, Connectors, and Salesmen –- who play a critical role in dictating trends.

Mavens are information brokers who have the knowledge and social skills to start epidemics; connectors are people who know lots of other people; and salesmen are people with the skills to persuade us when we are unconvinced by what we are hearing. While many of us play some of these roles, there are few truly influential mavens, connectors, or salesmen. An even few number of remarkable people are a combination of all three. Hugh Hewitt is one of those people.

As a best-selling author, national radio host, and popular blogger, Hewitt is a classic connector. And his willingness to help and encourage others, sparking in them a passion for blogging marks him as a true maven. Now, with the release of his extraordinary new book, Blog: Understanding the Information Reformation, he exhibits his persuasive skills as a salesman. Hewitt is a one-man epidemic, spreading the burgeoning trend of blogging.

While many of us might see 5 million blogs as a revolution already well on its way to maturity, Hewiit sees a vast, relatively untapped market. His book is squarely aimed at the large segment of the population who might use email and surf the Internet but still doesn’t quite understand the importance of the “blog thing.” Hewitt explains why blogs are significant, how they are changing the world around us, and – most importantly – how not to get left behind in this phase of the “information reformation.”

With a style reminiscent of management guru Tom Peters, Blog hits the ground running. “I know you are busy,” Hewitt writes in the opening words of the preface and spends the next 220 pages cutting to the chase. He doesn’t waste time trying to explain what isn’t necessary. Like a classic maven he convinces the reader to just trust him, he knows what he’s talking about and is willing to freely share his valuable knowledge.

Blog is divided into three sections, each explaining an essential aspect of blogging. Part one lays out the case for “What Happened” by describing the “blog storms” that helped bring down such powerful figures as Trent Lott and Dan Rather. Even mainstream media types will have a hard time scoffing at the power of the blogosphere after the retelling of these seminal “opinion storms.” And those of us who watched the events unfold in real time will be impressed by Hewitt’s post-mortem examination. He clearly did his homework.

In explaining the twenty-first century “information reformation” Hewitt compares it to the sixteenth century’s Protestant Reformation. While many others have compared blogging to the invention of the printing press, Hewitt delves into the history of the event and shows how a young monk named Luther used the new technology to transform Western culture. In doing so he revives an often overused metaphor and gives it new life, making a convincing case that 2005 really is “1449 and 1517, at the same moment.”

While the first section of the book will be of special interest to bloggers, Parts II and III lay out the case for why leaders of business, church, government, and media should be paying attention to the new media. Even those of us who spend a considerable amount of time thinking about blogging will be impressed by the creative uses for the medium that Hewitt suggests. His recommendations, if adopted, would benefit both bloggers and the organizations that could use our unique skills to their advantage.

Throughout the book, Hewitt exhibits his typically generous “linking” and praise for blogs and bloggers. Instead of using the book solely as a vehicle for promoting his own “brand”, he shows that blogging truly is an interconnected community. As he readily admits, no blog – no matter how much traffic it receives -- is as important as the blogosphere. The fact that Hewitt “gets” this and is able to use it to his advantage is one of the primary reasons he has become one of the foremost leaders of the new media.

When you order your copy of Blog from Amazon or buy it at your local bookstore you’ll want to get at least two copies –- one to keep and one to give away. No matter whether you are a connector, a maven, or just a wannabe, after reading Hewitt’s book you’ll become a salesman for blogging.


33 posted on 02/04/2005 7:36:31 AM PST by Valin (Sometimes you're the bug, and sometimes you're the windshield)
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To: Tolik

Thank you for posting this of VDH's probably best editorial todate!


34 posted on 02/04/2005 7:54:41 AM PST by AxelPaulsenJr (Pray Daily For Our Troops and President Bush)
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To: Tolik

Applause!


35 posted on 02/04/2005 8:23:03 AM PST by MEG33 (GOD BLESS OUR ARMED FORCES)
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To: Tolik


Murders Row: Hanson, Styne, Lileks.


36 posted on 02/04/2005 8:31:34 AM PST by aculeus
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To: headsonpikes
Tug your forelock when speaking to me!

Long time, howzit?

37 posted on 02/04/2005 8:36:17 AM PST by metesky ("Brethren, leave us go amongst them." Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond- The Searchers)
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To: metesky

Winter is getting tedious, as usual. Other than that, life is good, and my kids are leading good lives. How're you doin'? ;^)


38 posted on 02/04/2005 8:54:33 AM PST by headsonpikes (Spirit of '76 bttt!)
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To: Valin

Mavens are information brokers who have the knowledge and social skills to start epidemics;


connectors are people who know lots of other people;


and salesmen are people with the skills to persuade us when we are unconvinced by what we are hearing.


39 posted on 02/04/2005 8:56:38 AM PST by metesky ("Brethren, leave us go amongst them." Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond- The Searchers)
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To: headsonpikes
Every day above ground is the best day of my life.

Faux spring thaaah up heah. 'Bout fowty out theah.

;O)

40 posted on 02/04/2005 9:01:25 AM PST by metesky ("Brethren, leave us go amongst them." Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond- The Searchers)
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To: snowsislander
I think you are underestimating the "taco bell" reference.

Taco Bell has the ability to take the same five ingredients (bread dough, meat, cheese, lettuce, and tomatoes) and create a "new" menu item every two months that is less than 10 minuets of a ~minimum wage~ worker's wage and available in under five minuets anywhere across the nation. Is it Mexican Cuisine? Of course not, it doesn't really even pretend it is.

American Culture is more than "Taco Bell" but would Taco Bell be created anywhere else?
41 posted on 02/04/2005 9:03:01 AM PST by Purple GOPer (If you can't convince them, confuse them)
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To: Lindykim

"And yet one more point about the self-crowned 'elites': they are out of touch with reality, living as they do in their ivory tower world."

I see this daily out here in California where a lot of lefties talk the talk, but do not walk thee walk. One of the greatist hypocracies I see on a daily basis is the neighbor who has a Kerry sticker and a greenpeace sticker on the back of her SUV.

The amazing thing is that in her mind, such a thing is perfectly acceptable for HER, but not for all of us other poor, unwashed slobs.

I always smile when I see it because it sums up so well the elite attitude VDH is exposing in his article.


42 posted on 02/04/2005 9:09:19 AM PST by Owl558 (Please excuse my poor spelling)
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To: metesky

WOW. Who wouldn't want to write like him?


43 posted on 02/04/2005 9:40:57 AM PST by DesignerChick
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To: Tolik
If we acheive victory in Iraq, it will be sweet indeed to rub the Left's nose in it. We are not there yet. Nor were we in December 2003, when Professor Hanson thought we may have reached Tipping Point . The months since December 2003 haven't exactly been pacific.
44 posted on 02/04/2005 9:49:33 AM PST by Plutarch
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To: Tolik

Rush Limbaugh is reading this piece right now.


45 posted on 02/04/2005 9:51:47 AM PST by Bahbah
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To: Tolik; Mo1; Howlin; Peach; BeforeISleep; kimmie7; 4integrity; BigSkyFreeper; RandallFlagg; ...

Oh my..........I was laughing my a$$ off in my truck while RUSH was reading this.....


46 posted on 02/04/2005 9:57:42 AM PST by OXENinFLA
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To: Tolik

America f yeah!!


47 posted on 02/04/2005 9:58:47 AM PST by dennisw (Pryce-Jones: Arab culture is steeped in conspiracy theories, half truths, and nursery rhyme politics)
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To: OXENinFLA

Rush gave a great reading of this article. Sounded better that it does in print


48 posted on 02/04/2005 9:59:48 AM PST by dennisw (Pryce-Jones: Arab culture is steeped in conspiracy theories, half truths, and nursery rhyme politics)
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To: OXENinFLA

A GREAT read!


49 posted on 02/04/2005 10:00:59 AM PST by Peach
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To: OXENinFLA

"When are the Iraqis going to fight for their own country? When are they going to start shedding their own blood ... as American servicemen with this amount of training are ready to shed theirs," said Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Massachusetts.


50 posted on 02/04/2005 10:02:07 AM PST by Howlin (It's a great day to be an American -- and a Bush Republican!!!!)
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