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Cassava kills 30 kids in Bohol
www.philstar.com ^ | 3 10 05 | Jose Sollano

Posted on 03/10/2005 12:50:44 AM PST by freepatriot32

Thirty elementary school children died of food poisoning yesterday after eating a native delicacy made from cassava flour at the San Jose Elementary School in Mabini town, Bohol.

San Jose Vice Mayor Ester Tabigi said authorities had not yet determined exactly how many children had fallen ill, but at least 50 were still in critical condition last night in various hospitals in the nearby towns of Ubay and Talibon. Some children were brought as far as the provincial capital of Tagbilaran City, some 100 kilometers from Mabini.

Reports said the children, mostly second and third-grade pupils, started complaining of stomach pains and dizziness right after eating the cassava cake, known locally as maruya, during the morning recess at around 10:30.

"At 12 noon, teachers started to send victims to hospitals for treatment. Unfortunately, many of them failed to make it," said Philip Puderanan, public information officer of the Bohol Municipal Hall.

Senior Superintendent Sancho Bernales, chief of the Bohol police, said the children were taken to different hospitals in the province for medical treatment.

Military trucks reportedly helped bring the children to hospitals, the nearest of which was 20 to 30 kilometers away in Ubay town.

Of the 19 children taken to the Lita Cotamora Clinic in Ubay, 14 died and five were transferred to the nearby government-owned Don Emilio del Valle Hospital, where 20 other victims were confined. There were also two deaths reported at the Celestino Gallares Memorial Hospital in Tagbilaran.

Doctors who attended to the victims said food poisoning was the cause of death.

Sketchy reports said at least two women were responsible for selling the cassava cakes to the San Jose school children. One was identified as Aning Luyong, 60, who reportedly regularly sold snacks at the school. Luyong was said to have eaten the rest of the cassava cakes after the children fell ill and is now also in critical condition.

Another vendor, a 68-year-old woman, is reportedly now under the custody of Mabini town Mayor Stephen Rances.

"Kung puwedeng humingi kami ng tulong at mapa-imbestigahan ang pagkamatay ng mga bata. Kailangan namin ang mga experts para matulungan kami (We are appealing for help in investigating the cause of death of the children. We need experts)," Rances said yesterday.

Bohol Vice Gov. Julius Cesar Herrera said provincial health authorities in Tagbilaran will conduct further investigation to determine the victims’ exact cause of death.

The Department of Health has also sent medical experts to Mabini yesterday to investigate the incident. Tapped to conduct the probe were disease experts from the DOH’s Regional Service Unit in Bohol.

"The hospitals have enough manpower and supply to handle this. We are coordinating with our people in the field," Dr. Yolando Oliveros, head executive assistant of Health Secretary Manuel Dayrit, said.

Meanwhile, Bohol native George Evardo, a radio reporter, said cassava, known locally as balanghoy, should be cooked properly, especially during the hot season, as the wrong process can lead to bacterial poisoning. – With reports from Cecille Suerte Felipe, Shiela Crisostomo, AFP


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 30; abusayyaf; asia; bohol; cassava; children; conspiracy; cpswatch; dailyprayer; deathcultivation; educationnews; elementaryschool; fareast; food; foodpoisoning; glucoside; in; kids; kills; noteworthy; philippines; populationcontrol; prayerlist; recipes; students; turass
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the children that are still in critical condition and thier familys need our prayers.This is a huge tragedy.
1 posted on 03/10/2005 12:50:45 AM PST by freepatriot32
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To: freepatriot32

Ricin mixed into the flour? Cyanide? Hard to believe that simple cassava flour did this alone.

http://www.wam.umd.edu/~mathewsc/Cassava.html


2 posted on 03/10/2005 12:56:45 AM PST by 7.62 x 51mm (• Veni • Vidi • Vino • Visa • "I came, I saw, I drank wine, I shopped")
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To: freepatriot32

These poor kids...


3 posted on 03/10/2005 12:57:34 AM PST by coydog (My bathroom djinn can beat up your bathroom djinn!)
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To: 7.62 x 51mm
im not sure if it was accidental or a deliberate poisoning although on e women is in custody there is a large violent muslim group in the Philippines called the abbu sayef that works closely with al quaeda this might be their doing also
4 posted on 03/10/2005 1:01:04 AM PST by freepatriot32 (Jacques Chirac and Kofi Annan, a pantomime horse in which both men are playing the rear end. M.Steyn)
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To: 7.62 x 51mm

in my last post it should be spelled Abu Sayyaf


5 posted on 03/10/2005 1:02:28 AM PST by freepatriot32 (Jacques Chirac and Kofi Annan, a pantomime horse in which both men are playing the rear end. M.Steyn)
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To: freepatriot32

I have to believe this is much more than simple food poisoning. Bacteria doesn't make you sick right after you eat it unless it's a poison like botulism.


6 posted on 03/10/2005 1:02:42 AM PST by DB (©)
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To: 7.62 x 51mm
Abu Sayyaf Group
7 posted on 03/10/2005 1:06:04 AM PST by freepatriot32 (Jacques Chirac and Kofi Annan, a pantomime horse in which both men are playing the rear end. M.Steyn)
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To: mhking; Born Conservative

story for your ping lists perhaps


8 posted on 03/10/2005 1:14:44 AM PST by freepatriot32 (Jacques Chirac and Kofi Annan, a pantomime horse in which both men are playing the rear end. M.Steyn)
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To: DB

Like almonds and peach or apricot pits, manioc root (casava) contains natural cyanide compounds that improper preparation doesn't remove. Shred; squeeze; soak; squeeze; (repeat? Not sure.) dry; powder, grind, or rice; then prepare.

The women may have obtained improperly prepared or contaminated flour.

And to think we had tapioca for desert tonight.


9 posted on 03/10/2005 1:15:05 AM PST by ApplegateRanch (The world needs more horses, and fewer Jackasses!)
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To: freepatriot32
How incredibly sad. Those poor little kids. May God heal those who are sick and may He comfort the families who have lost their children.
10 posted on 03/10/2005 1:22:11 AM PST by NRA2BFree (Hosea 4:6 My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge ..)
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To: freepatriot32

No question in my mind that we should conform our food quality and inspection standards to those of South America, this to be politically correct.


11 posted on 03/10/2005 1:45:22 AM PST by Mad_Tom_Rackham (This just in from CBS: "There is no bias at CBS")
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To: freepatriot32

Prayers on the way.


12 posted on 03/10/2005 2:09:23 AM PST by BlessedBeGod (George W. Bush -- The Terror of the Terrorists)
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To: freepatriot32

Prayers for the victims and those who mourn.


13 posted on 03/10/2005 2:27:07 AM PST by MEG33 (GOD BLESS OUR ARMED FORCES)
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To: freepatriot32

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ArticleNews/TPStory/LAC/20050310/PHIL10/TPInternational/Asia
snip
The roots of the cassava plant, a major crop in tropical countries, are rich in protein, minerals and vitamins. However, cassava is poisonous unless it is peeled and thoroughly cooked. If it is eaten raw or prepared incorrectly, one of its chemical constituents will be attacked by digestive enzymes and give off the deadly poison cyanide. As little as two cassava roots can contain a fatal dose.

"Some said they took only two bites because it tasted bitter and the effects were felt five to 10 minutes later," said Harold Gallego of Garcia Memorial Provincial Hospital in the nearby town of Talibon, where 47 patients were taken.

snip


14 posted on 03/10/2005 2:31:40 AM PST by MEG33 (GOD BLESS OUR ARMED FORCES)
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To: MEG33

I always wondered how people first discovered the safe way to eat cassava. I mean, why did folks keep trying if the first to eat it got sick and died? How many died before someone smart enough figured out you had to peel, cook, mash/squeeze, recook, and remash/squeeze? Why did they keep trying? Why not move on to coconuts or something?


15 posted on 03/10/2005 3:33:03 AM PST by Alas Babylon!
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To: 7.62 x 51mm

The author of this article is not familiar with casaba, known as yuca in this country. He says, …”should be cooked properly…” Heck, there is only one way to cook it. It is to boil it whether in soup or plain water (like one boils a potato). If it is cooked in plain water, it is then generally sliced and fried; or it is mashed (after boiling of course), filled with a meat filling (like a taco), and then into the frying pan to deep fry. These children did not get sick from the casaba unless poison was added to it. They got sick from the filling.


16 posted on 03/10/2005 3:48:41 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: All

I'm really having a problem with this article.

The yuka has a hard skin. What was fun, was taking this hard skin, after peeling way the outer portion of the skin, we, as children, used to take those discarded peelings and cut them into funny teeth and wear them in our mouths. None of us dropped dead from that. We are still around.


17 posted on 03/10/2005 3:59:54 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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Oh, I forgot. The yuca was in its raw state when we would make these "false" teeth and wear them.


18 posted on 03/10/2005 4:02:26 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)

The water leaches the poison out and has to be drained off, not boiled down. I imagine someone accidentally let it boil too long and the toxins were reabsorbed.


19 posted on 03/10/2005 4:12:20 AM PST by TaxRelief (Support the Troops Rally, Fayetteville, NC -- March 19, 2005)
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
The author of this article is not familiar with casaba, known as yuca in this country. He says, …”should be cooked properly…” Heck, there is only one way to cook it. It is to boil it whether in soup or plain water (like one boils a potato). If it is cooked in plain water, it is then generally sliced and fried; or it is mashed (after boiling of course), filled with a meat filling (like a taco), and then into the frying pan to deep fry. These children did not get sick from the casaba unless poison was added to it. They got sick from the filling.

Heh. Am I the only freeper who has eaten cassava cakes? I've even made a few. My suspicion is the cassava root can vary in the amount of cyanide it contains. I've eaten the root many times in Cuban and Latin restaurants. It's prepared as you describe. Cassava is very common in Brazil and Africa

Cassava cakes are a bit different, are made from the processed then dried out cassava toot. It's turned into something akin to wheat flour that can be stored from season to season. It can be transported and sold as a commodity. When it's processed the cyanide compounds are leached out, then the stuff is dried out into a coarse flour. Water is added to make a cake that can be fried on your griddle like a corn cake. You can buy this flour in markets in Africa. The flour I got here (USA) was from Nigeria. The fresh root in the (USA) supermarkets comes from the Caribbean, though I ate some a friend grew in Florida

20 posted on 03/10/2005 4:14:40 AM PST by dennisw (Seeing as how this is a .44 magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world .........)
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To: Alas Babylon!

That`s what I always wondered about Poke Sallet,it`s poisonous unless cooked correctly.How did people first learn to eat it without dieing from it?

I still like a `mess` fixed at least once every spring.


21 posted on 03/10/2005 4:16:41 AM PST by tnfarmer
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)

Not all varieties of Yuca contain the bitter poison. The poison, Glucoside, can be detected by the bitterness--the stronger the bitterness; the higher concentration of glucoside.


22 posted on 03/10/2005 4:21:13 AM PST by TaxRelief (Support the Troops Rally, Fayetteville, NC -- March 19, 2005)
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To: dennisw

Thank you for your reply.

It must be, and I must believe, as you say, "My suspicion is the cassava root can vary in the amount of cyanide it contains." Thank goodness there has never been an event where one drops dead from eating casaba here in Panama.


23 posted on 03/10/2005 4:40:32 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: TaxRelief

"Not all varieties of Yuca contain the bitter poison. The poison, Glucoside, can be detected by the bitterness--the stronger the bitterness; the higher concentration of glucoside."

That is good to know. The yuca we have here is not bitter in any way, or we never would have been shaping false teeth form it and sticking it in our mouths. I suppose the folks here are lucky.


24 posted on 03/10/2005 4:46:35 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)

Probably the more wild yucca varieties has more cyanide while the cultivated yucca has some cyanide but most has been bred out of it.

I read citrus was originally bitter, that oranges etc. had to be bred to be as sweet as they are today


25 posted on 03/10/2005 4:55:12 AM PST by dennisw (Seeing as how this is a .44 magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world .........)
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To: dennisw

To be honest with you,dennisw, I really don’t know if Panama makes or imports yuca flour. I’ve never seen it on the supermarket shelves. I will take a look next time. The yuca frituras (fried yuca dishes) made here are from the freshly boiled yuca. The yuca is then mashed like thick mashed potatoes, stuffed, and fried. But I need to look into this yuca flour thing because of my curiosity.


26 posted on 03/10/2005 4:56:38 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: DB

I read somewhere that this particular edible, when prepared improperly, produces cyanide as it's broken down. Two of the plants in question can apparently kill an adult. *shrug* Just relating what I read. I'll have to go back and see if I can find it.


27 posted on 03/10/2005 4:57:16 AM PST by Frapster (Mighty Warrior)
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To: dennisw

Yes, there are several vegetables and fruits we consume today that were not eatable in the past because of their bitterness or being too sour.


28 posted on 03/10/2005 5:00:04 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)

I've been eating cassava all my life. Eaten it raw, eaten it as cereal... however if you don't cook the meat for pasteles well you can get sick.


29 posted on 03/10/2005 5:01:41 AM PST by cyborg (http://mentalmumblings.blogspot.com/)
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To: Frapster

But enough to take you out hours after ingesting it? Tha't pretty potent.


30 posted on 03/10/2005 5:03:08 AM PST by DB (©)
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
The yuka has a hard skin. What was fun, was taking this hard skin, after peeling way the outer portion of the skin, we, as children, used to take those discarded peelings and cut them into funny teeth and wear them in our mouths. None of us dropped dead from that. We are still around.

That's because it ISN'T the same thing. Yucca growing in the USA is not the tropical cassava plant used to make manioc. The problem is that in Latin America cassava is also known as yucca. But the yucca in the USA is a spike-leaved plant related to the pineapple, where the cassava plant know as yucca in Tropical America is a leafy bush. Here's a picture of a cassava plant:

Cassava is a perennial woody shrub, grown as an annual.

And a picture of USA yucca plant:

I'm in Alabama, and I have a big mound of yucca growing in the front yard. Nice flowers, but I'm not going to eat any of it!

31 posted on 03/10/2005 5:05:02 AM PST by Alas Babylon!
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To: Alas Babylon!

Yes, the first foto is the plant that grows here. Thank you.


32 posted on 03/10/2005 5:07:57 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: cyborg; Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer); Alas Babylon!

This is the yucca from supermarkets and that I've seen growing in me friend's back yard. I've also eaten his backyard yucca. Yucca isn't very mineral rich and has less protein than grains. But it does provide bulk and carbohydrates and can be the main food of a tropical diet in poor countries if other foods are eaten

I like boiled yucca root. It's a bland side dish but very nice along with other foods.

 

19 Steps to Making Yucca Bread

19 Steps to Making Yucca Bread

Casabe is a thin, cracker-like bread made out of yucca. It is an important staple of the Garífuna diet and a custom inherited from the Arawak Indians, one of the Garífuna ancestors. The process to make casabe is as follows.

1. Harvest the yucca. Extract 18-20 pounds of this root.
2. Peel the yucca.
3. Wash and clean the yucca with seawater to give the roots a distinct salt flavor.
4. Grate the yucca with an egi, a wooden grating board embedded with small quartz stones.
5. Pack the shredded yucca into the ruguma, a 2-3 meter-long straining device woven out of palm leaves.
6. Hang the ruguma from the rafters.
7. Shake and stretch the ruguma to drain the poisonous liquid (cyanogenic glycoside) from the grated yucca.
8. Remove the yucca dough from the ruguma and leave covered with a towel to dry overnight.
9. The next morning, sift the yucca with the jívise (a large, braided sieve) to produce a refined flour.
10. Place firewood beneath the grill and light the stove.
11. Sprinkle chingaste (the material that did not pass through the jívise) onto the grill to determine the temperature.
12. When the stove is ready, scoop the yucca flour onto the grill.
13. Spread the flour over the grill, forming a round circle. Fill any holes with excess flour.
14. As the bread heats and begins to toast, sweep the loose flour away with a special yucca brush.
15. Sift a small amount of yucca flour onto the casabe.
16. Flatten the yucca bread with a wooden tool called the garagu.
17. Carefully flip the casave onto its other side. Sweep away any excess flour.
18. Flatten the bread with the garagu again. Brush and scrape off the extra flour. Use a knife to round the edges.
Click here to order fresh casabe made by Garífuna peoples!
 
19. Remove the casabe from the grill and allow to cool. Make incisions so the bread can be broken into smaller portions. Eat and enjoy!
 

33 posted on 03/10/2005 5:40:38 AM PST by dennisw (Seeing as how this is a .44 magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world .........)
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To: dennisw

Yeah that's it.


34 posted on 03/10/2005 5:42:19 AM PST by cyborg (http://mentalmumblings.blogspot.com/)
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To: 7.62 x 51mm

Fox News had a report on this last night. It seems that when casava is prepared, it's possible to do a bad job of cleaning it and leave cyanide residue, cyanide being a naturally occurring part of some of the casava plant.


35 posted on 03/10/2005 6:10:40 AM PST by libstripper
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To: ApplegateRanch

Wouldn't it take a heck of a lot of casava floor to have this level of toxicity?


36 posted on 03/10/2005 6:28:00 AM PST by BJClinton (Error: 404 Tagline not Found in Database)
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To: BJClinton; ApplegateRanch

Nevermind, apparently this kind of poisoning is quite common with cassava. Very sad.


37 posted on 03/10/2005 6:30:39 AM PST by BJClinton (Error: 404 Tagline not Found in Database)
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To: Mad_Tom_Rackham
No question in my mind that we should conform our food quality and inspection standards to those of South America, this to be politically correct.

Even on threads with devastating news, some of you people just cannot give it a rest.

38 posted on 03/10/2005 7:13:25 AM PST by Coop (In memory of a true hero - Pat Tillman)
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To: Alas Babylon!

I ask the same about the Japanese and the puffer fish.


39 posted on 03/10/2005 7:16:30 AM PST by printhead
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To: freepatriot32

Tragedy.

However, a remark to the nuts who advocate a raw food diet (i.e the Hallelujah Diet) --- COOKING IS NOT EVIL!!!!


40 posted on 03/10/2005 7:21:41 AM PST by fishtank
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To: dennisw

Sorry for the late comment, but I had to go get my car inspected, and I just got home.

The Yuca bread recipe sounds interesting. Question: Does your friend’s yuca have a bitter taste to it? I ask because I’m curious. I’m trying to compare your friend’s yuca with ours.

Also, now that I am thinking about it, and I verified it just now, when making the dough for the yuca frituras (here in Panama), a tiny, tiny bit of regular wheat flour is added to the dough to make it hold together better.


41 posted on 03/10/2005 8:21:31 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: dennisw

One way yuca is eaten here is after it is boiled, slather butter on it with a little bit of salt and a tiny bit of garlic. One can also chop up a little bit of parsley and sprinkle it over the yuca for color. I much prefer the yuca frituras, though.


42 posted on 03/10/2005 8:29:56 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: dennisw

According to google, there are two varieties of cassava, the bitter kind, that is poisonous and is used to make tapioca, and the sweet kind, which is not poisonous, and is also known as yuca.


43 posted on 03/10/2005 9:09:16 AM PST by CobaltBlue
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To: Alas Babylon!

Yucca isn't yuca. Yuca, cassava, manioc, all are names for the same two plants, the bitter/poisonous one which they use to make tapioca, and the sweet/non-poisonous one which tastes a lot like a potato.

The yucca in your yard is a completely different plant.


44 posted on 03/10/2005 9:12:07 AM PST by CobaltBlue
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To: CobaltBlue

"Yucca isn't yuca. Yuca, cassava, manioc, all are names for the same two plants, the bitter/poisonous one which they use to make tapioca, and the sweet/non-poisonous one which tastes a lot like a potato.

"The yucca in your yard is a completely different plant."

Please expand on this...thank you. I'm interested.


45 posted on 03/10/2005 9:29:37 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: CobaltBlue

Oh, I see....I didn't catch the difference in spelling in your post until this second. "Yucca" is a different animal.


46 posted on 03/10/2005 9:32:00 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: CobaltBlue

Wait a minute...Is "yucca" and "yuca" being used interchangeably here? In Latin countries, the correct selling is yuca...one "c."


47 posted on 03/10/2005 9:39:53 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: Alas Babylon!
I always wondered how people first discovered the safe way to eat cassava.

I always wondered how people first discovered the safe way to eat lobster.

48 posted on 03/10/2005 9:42:51 AM PST by Alouette (Learned Mother of Zion)
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To: libstripper

Fox news got a little bit confused: The plant contains cyanogenic glucoside, which releases cyanide when "disturbed". It takes 150° or 3 days (I believe) to complete the reaction that releases the cyanide.


49 posted on 03/10/2005 12:58:42 PM PST by TaxRelief (Support the Troops Rally, Fayetteville, NC -- March 19, 2005)
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To: Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
There is an ornamental perennial tropical shrub that grows in the US that people call yucca that is really related to agave plants, also known as Spanish dagger.

Nobody eats this. The yuca your mama serves with roast pork is a completely different plant.


50 posted on 03/10/2005 1:06:47 PM PST by CobaltBlue
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