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Eighteen Hundred And Froze To Death (The Infamous 'Year Without Summer')
Island Net.com ^ | 4-7-2004 | Keith C. Heidon,PhD,ACM

Posted on 03/12/2005 8:10:49 PM PST by blam

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1815 Tambora Volcano
1 posted on 03/12/2005 8:10:50 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

I just completed watching a special on the Tambora (Pompeii In The East), on the Discovery Channel. Thought others would be interested.


2 posted on 03/12/2005 8:12:28 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

Where was the Sierra club then. Blaming a Bush forefather iI suppose.


3 posted on 03/12/2005 8:18:01 PM PST by satchmodog9 (Murder and weather are our only news)
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To: blam
The Little Ice Age in Europe, 1560 - 1850
4 posted on 03/12/2005 8:23:19 PM PST by clyde asbury (What a fool believes, he sees. The wise man has the power to reason away.)
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To: blam
The most likely cause was volcanic influences. Proponents note that a number of major volcanic eruptions preceded 1816: Soufriére and St. Vincent in 1812: Mayon and Luzon in the Phillippines during 1814; Tambora in Indonesia during 1815. The volcanic theory of climatic influence relates increased volcanic activity with decreased temperatures due to the increased reflection of solar radiation from volcanic dust blown and trapped high in the atmosphere. The Tambora eruption has been estimated to be the most violent in historical times. The explosion is believed to have lifted 150 to 180 cubic kilometres of material into the atmosphere. For a comparison, the infamous 1883 eruption of Krakatau ejected only 20 cubic kilometres of material into the air, and yet it affected sunsets for several years after.

The first thing I thought of was volcanoes, too. But, as I kept reading, there were no mentions of 'blood red' or colorful sunstes as I had read about with Krakatau.

sunspots, maybe?

Thanks for the link to Tambora. I'll have to check that out.

5 posted on 03/12/2005 8:25:02 PM PST by eccentric (a.k.a. baldwidow)
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To: blam; farmfriend

BTTT


6 posted on 03/12/2005 8:25:32 PM PST by Fiddlstix (This Tagline for sale. (Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: eccentric
"The first thing I thought of was volcanoes, too. But, as I kept reading, there were no mentions of 'blood red' or colorful sunstes as I had read about with Krakatau. "

The special I just watched covered this aspect by showing the red sunsets painted by various artists of that time.

7 posted on 03/12/2005 8:27:19 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
It's on again here at midnight. I'll get my trusty vcr ready....

thanks

8 posted on 03/12/2005 8:27:49 PM PST by eccentric (a.k.a. baldwidow)
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To: blam

We just had another six inches of snow today, on top of a considerable pile of snow already there. The snow off the roof outside my study is reaching up toward the tops of the windows. My snowblower just broke down.

Ouch. I wonder what Punxatauny Phil had to say in 1816?


9 posted on 03/12/2005 8:32:56 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Cicero
"We just had another six inches of snow today, on top of a considerable pile of snow already there. The snow off the roof outside my study is reaching up toward the tops of the windows. My snowblower just broke down."

Man, where are you. I spent the day in shorts and T-shirt...it's cooled off this evening some though.

10 posted on 03/12/2005 8:39:08 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

Global Warming Bump


11 posted on 03/12/2005 8:41:36 PM PST by chaosagent (It's all right to be crazy. Just don't let it drive you nuts.)
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To: blam

Vermont.


12 posted on 03/12/2005 8:45:14 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: blam

Considering that baseball players are known as the 'boys of summer', I thought New England has been without summer since 1918, up until last year that is........


13 posted on 03/12/2005 8:50:44 PM PST by NorCalRepub
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To: blam

Thank you so much for posting this. I've refrenced this incident before but having a link will be nice.


14 posted on 03/12/2005 8:50:48 PM PST by bad company (There can be no freedom without right and wrong.)
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To: blam

" Man, where are you. I spent the day in shorts and T-shirt...it's cooled off this evening some though."

It was 70 degrees here in Longmont, Colorado today but it cooled down this evening and it's snowing like a dog now. It's supposed to snow for three days. We need the moisture.


15 posted on 03/12/2005 8:52:17 PM PST by dljordan
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To: dljordan
"It was 70 degrees here in Longmont, Colorado today but it cooled down this evening and it's snowing like a dog now. It's supposed to snow for three days. We need the moisture."

In Mobile: High:76 Low:54 Present: 61 Fair. (Bed time...g'nite)

16 posted on 03/12/2005 8:56:13 PM PST by blam
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To: eccentric

There's really no doubt that Tambora caused the Year Without Summer. If anything, it's a bit odd that this commentary seems so uncertain in attributing it.


17 posted on 03/12/2005 9:03:12 PM PST by AntiGuv ()
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To: blam

bump for later reading........


18 posted on 03/12/2005 9:53:11 PM PST by scan59 (Why am I always so pessimistic?)
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To: blam

bttt


19 posted on 03/12/2005 9:55:12 PM PST by octobersky
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To: Cicero
Yeah, we were supposed to have 4-6" of snow. It started late last night, and by 10am, we had about 2 additional inches over what we'd gotten the previous week. Then it started snowing steadily, and in less than 2 hours we had an additional 4"! Our son plowed the driveway and I took him out to a LAN party. When Sir SuziQ went out to get him at 8pm, it was STILL snowing, and there was an additional 8"!! That makes over a foot in total for this storm!! Our son will have to plow again tomorrow!

I'm so sick of this white crap!

20 posted on 03/12/2005 10:10:44 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: blam

BUMP
Very interesting. Good post.


21 posted on 03/12/2005 10:20:16 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: blam

Thanks for the post, it is quite an interesting bit of history. [Too bad the history channel did not have something on it, but they were too busy with UFOs again tonight. ]


22 posted on 03/12/2005 10:58:27 PM PST by JLS
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To: Cicero
We live on upper yukon, it was 48 above today; but will probably be zero nx week. Had about a month and a half of minus 50-60 this winter.

Know some people that live downriver and live about exclusively on what they grow & catch. That means they eat beets, carotts, and lettuce in about everything along with moose and salmon. Maybe every other year their spuds make it. No complaining from them though. Summer snowfall common here and you plan for it. We always get 1000 lb potatoes, and use plastic for frost.

Cold summers are like Y2K fears.

23 posted on 03/13/2005 12:08:29 AM PST by Eska
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To: blam

bttt


24 posted on 03/13/2005 12:10:41 AM PST by nopardons
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To: blam
"The most likely cause was volcanic influences. Proponents note that a number of major volcanic eruptions preceded 1816: Soufriére and St. Vincent in 1812: Mayon and Luzon in the Phillippines during 1814; Tambora in Indonesia during 1815. The volcanic theory of climatic influence relates increased volcanic activity with decreased temperatures due to the increased reflection of solar radiation from volcanic dust blown and trapped high in the atmosphere. The Tambora eruption has been estimated to be the most violent in historical times. The explosion is believed to have lifted 150 to 180 cubic kilometres of material into the atmosphere. For a comparison, the infamous 1883 eruption of Krakatau ejected only 20 cubic kilometres of material into the air, and yet it affected sunsets for several years after."

The Tambora eruption was in a league of its own - in historic times.

25 posted on 03/13/2005 12:12:51 AM PST by capitan_refugio
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To: codyjacksmom
ping for later read.
26 posted on 03/13/2005 1:10:36 AM PST by codyjacksmom (Be nice! I'm blonde and will work for an explanation.)
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To: blam
This was obviously caused by burning fossil fuels causing the greenhouse effect.
Thankfully we have the Kyoto treaty to change all that /sarc
27 posted on 03/13/2005 1:45:50 AM PST by Manic_Episode (OUT OF ORDER)
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To: blam
I just completed watching a special on the Tambora (Pompeii In The East), on the Discovery Channel.

I saw part of that show, (fell asleep, the hazzard of eating dinner and then lying in bed).

The caldera (?) is hugh, five miles across?

28 posted on 03/13/2005 1:59:33 AM PST by csvset
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To: csvset
"The caldera (?) is hugh, five miles across?"

Yup. Compare that to the Yellowstone caldera (super-volcano) which is 50 miles across

29 posted on 03/13/2005 6:54:16 AM PST by blam
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To: blam
......and here I was thinking that only human activity could affect climate change. [/sarcasm]

Thanks.

30 posted on 03/13/2005 7:01:30 AM PST by DoctorMichael (The Fourth Estate is a Fifth Column!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
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To: blam

"I just completed watching a special on the Tambora"

Saw that too. Excellent.


31 posted on 03/13/2005 7:14:15 AM PST by Smartaleck
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To: Eska

I guess it's all relative. We lost almost all our apples last year and the year before because of late frosts, and my kids planted the vegetable garden several times. Maybe this year we'll do better. We have some really old apple trees. They're small and gnarly looking but much tastier than the new ones.


32 posted on 03/13/2005 1:28:36 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Cicero
We usually plant everything 1st June, long summer sunshine warms everything up last week of may. 50-50 that you'll have a frost until 3rd week of june, but then usually good until 3rd week of august. LOw places and along river sometimes gets hit more often. I'm even thinking about sweet potatoes under plastic this year and I have friends that actually grow their own 4-5 foot tobacco plants and say its better than no ciggs at all.

I know people that grow spliced apple trees and they survive the minus 60 winter temps but the moose are hard on them.

33 posted on 03/13/2005 3:29:56 PM PST by Eska
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To: Eska

I just prune the old trees, I haven't planted any, but as I understand it all apple trees in common use are grafted. You take a hardy rootstock and graft the kind of apple tree you want onto it. That's why new shoots coming up from the roots need to be cut back, because they won't produce any useful fruit.

We get down to around 30 below here from time to time, so we need hardy stock, but that's still quite a ways above 50 below.


34 posted on 03/13/2005 7:01:34 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: blam

Bookmark.

Most people don't realize but for the last 100 or so years we have been in a warming trend. We should be at the end of it now though.


35 posted on 03/16/2005 6:05:21 AM PST by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: blam

Global cooling.


36 posted on 03/16/2005 6:06:33 AM PST by <1/1,000,000th%
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To: blam

Indiana became a state in 1816, I've often wondered if there were a connection or the year without summer was an omen.........


37 posted on 03/16/2005 6:10:02 AM PST by lmailbvmbipfwedu
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To: redgolum

What was the summer weather forecast like in Northern New England between 100,000 and 12,000 years ago.

Weather Channel spokesman: - 50 F today, high 60 mile per hour winds, glacier expected to remain 1/2 mile thick in the long-term 1,000 year forecast. Same tomorrow.


38 posted on 03/16/2005 6:12:52 AM PST by JustDoItAlways
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To: blam; FairOpinion; Ernest_at_the_Beach; SunkenCiv; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; ...
Catastrophism ping, and to all a good night.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on, off, or alter the "Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list --
Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
The GGG Digest
-- Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

39 posted on 04/03/2005 9:39:24 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Friday, March 25, 2005.)
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To: SunkenCiv; blam
Thanks for the ping to more of blam's good stuff!

This news just in:

AFTER TWO LARGE ANNUAL GAINS, RATE OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 INCREASE RETURNS TO AVERAGE, NOAA REPORTS

40 posted on 04/03/2005 10:36:33 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (This tagline no longer operative....floated away in the flood of 2005 ,)
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To: blam

Here in Michigan, 2 years ago, we had a snowstorm on May 6 - got about 5 inches. And I've seen plenty days in June that felt cold enough for snow.


41 posted on 04/03/2005 10:42:23 PM PDT by Larry Lucido (We miss ya, Indie! Law Enforcement Against Prohibition - http://www.leap.cc)
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To: blam

The fact that the Earth has remained temperate, (between the freezing point and the evaporation point of water) for the last like 3.5 billion years is remarkable.

We are at just the right distance, just the right size to not have a crushing atmosphere, been pretty lucky.

It could change in a decade.


42 posted on 04/04/2005 2:43:12 AM PDT by djf
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To: Cicero

I grew up in upstate New York, where domestic and wild apple trees are everywhere.

The wild varieties tend to be a bit softer than the hybrids but they are extremely sweet and seem to ripen overnight. They don't store well, except when they got 16 inches of snow over them.

Pretty much the same with the pears, but they are usually harder and last longer.

I miss the black raspberries.


43 posted on 04/04/2005 2:52:13 AM PDT by djf
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To: Larry Lucido

May 5 snowstorm on the day we closed on the house here in central Wisconsin eight or so years ago. Only a couple of inches though & it melted that day.


44 posted on 04/04/2005 4:05:11 AM PDT by elli1
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To: blam

This is when my ancestors, who had lived in New England since the 1600's, packed it in and headed for sunny Illinois.


45 posted on 04/04/2005 4:44:20 AM PDT by wildehunt (follow those hounds..)
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To: Eska
We always get 1000 lb potatoes,

Yow! Those are big potatoes!

46 posted on 04/04/2005 7:30:47 AM PDT by null and void (innocent, incapacitated, inconvenient, and insured - a lethal combination for Terri...)
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To: Larry Lucido

Yeah, 2003 and 2004 had long, wet, cold springs, which made me think of the sudden end to good weather at the beginning of the Little Ice Age (not that I was there, just read about it). Due to changes in agricultural methods since 1900, the US generated its largest ever grain crop last year, despite the crappy spring around here (Michigan).


47 posted on 04/04/2005 9:12:58 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (last updated my FreeRepublic profile on Friday, March 25, 2005.)
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To: djf

A couple of our neighbors have old-fashioned cider presses, so when the time is right we usually have a big party, everybody brings baskets of apples and jugs, and we handle the problem that way.

My wife also makes applesauce and freezes it. The little old-fashioned apples always make much better applesauce than the commercial brands.


48 posted on 04/04/2005 5:47:12 PM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: null and void

Wife fryed up yukon golds today, that had been down root cellar; they are actually sweeter than when dug last summer.


49 posted on 04/04/2005 9:31:12 PM PDT by Eska
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Just updating the GGG information, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

50 posted on 02/27/2006 10:20:40 PM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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