Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Sundaland (GGG)
Personal Pages ^ | 3-31-2005

Posted on 03/31/2005 8:48:54 PM PST by blam

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-75 last
To: blam
I cannot (for the life of me) understand Why this thread got only 21 replies.

Just maybe it's because the foundation of the thread is a nut job who learned a language no one else knows, and read thousands of tablets which "mysteriously" disappeared.

Without leaving a trace.
Cameras had been invented, but it was against his religion to use one. I suppose.

51 posted on 03/27/2007 3:49:50 PM PDT by Publius6961 (MSM: Israelis are killed by rockets; Lebanese are killed by Israelis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Publius6961
For anyone who still wonders how any of this stuff can be taken seriously, just google the word "naacal"...

Moonbat city..

52 posted on 03/27/2007 4:34:37 PM PDT by Publius6961 (MSM: Israelis are killed by rockets; Lebanese are killed by Israelis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 51 | View Replies]

To: blam
Or, a much worse thought, Antarctica was also melting. Despite that, the circumpolar vortex at the Antarctic Circle would have kept things cold enough year round to maintain a massive ice dam at the outer perimeter of the continent.

Melting of ice within the ice dam would have created a massive lake up to 2 miles deep.

When the dam finally broke in a catastrophic crash, you'd had a tsunami leaving Antarctica headed North with the power to climb thousands of feet in altitude as it hit continental masses.

Guy would have had to be hunting birds of paradise up in the Java/Sumatran mountains to survive that, and he'd still have to be on the North slopes!

Just about the only population that'd been left relatively intact would be living in Northern Asia or Central Africa.

53 posted on 06/05/2007 6:53:06 PM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Publius6961
Good grief ~ I'm still working on the meaning/origin of two "hand me down words" from oldtimers in the family for a language now spoken poorly by less than 400 people.

One of them seems to mean "reindeer crossing" or "mule's crossing", and the other seems to mean "reindeer pants" ~ like a coverall you might wear out working with animals in a corral.

These words give me a clue about where some of the ancestors came from several centuries ago (from roughly 1638 to 1812). It's definitely the Sapmai, but is it in Finland or Norway?

So many questions, so few answers, and when the family members left the place, there was no nationstate that'd yet organized any of it.

Still, little as I can figure out about the individuals involved, their ancestors seem to have used a highly developed pictoglyph system as much as 9,000 years ago, and that's very important.

The Chinese now have a collection of 20,000 similar pictoglyphs to study and they think it's very nearly an ideographic system very similar to the one currently in use in China.

These places where this stuff was found were cold as the devil back then and had more than today's 168 "snow days" per year.

I can tell you why they had a lot of time on their hands, but not what their language sounded like, or what they called themselves or others, or if they even knew that others existed.

Research in all things procedes in fits and starts and progress is always questionable.

The Sundaland thesis fits into my own question ~ why is it cinnamon is so incredibly healthy for 5% of the human population to use ~ it helps us use insulin, lowers cholesterol, drives down tri-glycerides, and smells so good. Cinnamon's homeland is Cylon and Sundaland. We must have lived there a long time for an appetite like that to become written in the genes.

54 posted on 06/05/2007 7:09:14 PM PDT by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 52 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
"When the dam finally broke in a catastrophic crash, you'd had a tsunami leaving Antarctica headed North with the power to climb thousands of feet in altitude as it hit continental masses."

Some think the Laurentide ice sheet floated, then broke in half and went crashing into Hudson Bay . Gigantic tsunamis!! Could explain why even the Tibeteans have flood stories of the 'mountain-topping' variety.

55 posted on 06/05/2007 7:48:50 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 53 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
"Cinnamon's homeland is Cylon and Sundaland. We must have lived there a long time for an appetite like that to become written in the genes."

Hmmm. My youngest brother has an allergic reaction to cinnamon.

Humans would have flourished in Sundaland during the Ice Age.

56 posted on 06/05/2007 8:00:12 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
Another Sundaland article:

Where Was Atlantis? Sundaland Fits The Bill, Surely!

57 posted on 06/05/2007 8:03:35 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 54 | View Replies]

To: S0122017
No, it's not science. It's an interesting theory, though. The money quote in the article:

"Many scientific communities are sadly all too like religions. In spite of all the evidence against their theory, their doctrine and dogma must be observed and preserved!"

Boy, ain't that the truth. Sort of like what Schoch and co get from the Egyptologists, or anyone who disagrees that immediate radical action is necessary to combat anthropogenic Global Warming.

There are some fascinating black holes in our collectively murky prehistory and quite a bit of still unreconciled (to my satisfaction) evidence. I'm willing to listen and research and value the sensible theories while disregarding those which are less so. Multiple pyramid-building post-Neolithic cultures independently developing on various continents never sat well with me as a theory.

58 posted on 08/03/2007 12:55:19 PM PDT by Dr.Deth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Dr.Deth
For me the 'money quote' (and where I started laughing) was this one:

The tablets revealed that man first appeared in Mu millions of years ago, at a time when dinosaurs walked the Earth, and that a sophisticated race of 64 million people had somehow evolved.

That would put the origin of Man about 60 million years in the past -- shades of Alley Oop. I have no doubt that Sundaland existed and I doubt we're even close to answering questions about the origin of mankind and civilization. But a belief based on secret disappearing tablets read and interpreted by one man -- well, I'll pass in favor of real evidence.

59 posted on 08/03/2007 1:25:46 PM PDT by Bernard Marx
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 58 | View Replies]

To: Bernard Marx

bookmark


60 posted on 08/17/2007 6:02:21 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Fight the illegal Mexican colonizers & imperialist conquistadors! Long live the resistance!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: blam

Interesting read.


61 posted on 08/17/2007 8:11:33 PM PDT by ConservativeMind
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

bump


62 posted on 08/28/2007 5:14:57 PM PDT by dangerdoc (dangerdoc (not actually dangerous any more))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam

Thank you. I followed the link from another of your postings. Very interesting reading. I also believe that civilization is much older than currently acknowledged. The Sundaland read is compelling. And thanks to all for the additional links. I’ll have more to read (when I’m not at work...gotta run)


63 posted on 08/29/2007 3:58:52 AM PDT by SueRae
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
The Cuicuilco Pyramid in Mexico is another enigma. It was geologically dated to before 8,500 BC based upon the fact that it existed before the first volcanic eruption of Mount Xitli.
regarding that...
Gods, Graves, and Scholars: The Story of Archaeology
by C. W. Ceram
Now, several of these pyramids located at different sites from Tula to Monte Alban have been discussed, yet one of the most important has yet to be mentioned. This is the Pyramid of Cuicuilco, which stands on a mound 22.4 feet high, situated at the southern limits of Mexico City. The Pyramid of Cuicuilco rises up out of a weird landscape of darkly stony aspect. At one time the volcanoes Ajusco and Xitli (perhaps only the latter) erupted. The god within the pyramid was apparently remiss in diverting the glowing flood of lava that flowed about the pyramid, for half the structure was drowned in bubbling muck. The archaeologists investigating this phenomenon called on colleagues from another faculty, the geologists, for help. How old is the lava, they inquired. The geologists, not realizing that their answer was knocking a world picture awry, answered: "Eight thousand years." ...Yet late research is more inclined to consider it false.

64 posted on 11/01/2007 11:53:11 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Monday, October 22, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
Did Tolkien have a take on this (Numenor)?

Cheers!

65 posted on 06/22/2009 8:38:01 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: grey_whiskers
"In the books, Númenor was a huge island located in the Sundering Seas to the west of Middle-earth, the main setting of Tolkien's writings, and was accounted to be the greatest realm of Men. However, the inhabitants' cessation of the service to Eru Ilúvatar and rebellion against the Valar led to the downfall of the island and death of the majority of its population."
66 posted on 06/22/2009 9:17:11 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 65 | View Replies]

To: grey_whiskers; blam
From the Akallabeth in the Silmarillion:

But these things come not into the tale of the Drowning of Numenor, of which now all is told. And even the name of that land perished, and Men spoke thereafter not of Elenna, nor of Andor the Gift that was taken away, nor of Numenore on the confines of the world, but the exiles on the shores of the sea, if they turned towards the West in the desire of their hearts, spoke of Mar-nu-Falmar that was whelmed in the waves, Akallabeth the Downfallen, Atalante in the Eldarin tongue.'

He absolutely had that take.

67 posted on 09/29/2009 7:37:02 PM PDT by Free Vulcan (Resident Obama: Not a President, not a Citizen, living here but from somewhere else...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 65 | View Replies]

To: Free Vulcan
I wondered if he did that as a reference to "Atlantis" by using his philological expertise to come up with a likely-sounding root word which might well have "weathered" over the years to become Atlantis. Thanks.

Cheers!

68 posted on 09/30/2009 11:45:33 AM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 67 | View Replies]

To: blam

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Just updating the GGG info, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

·Dogpile · Archaeologica · LiveScience · Archaeology · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo · Google ·
· The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


69 posted on 01/05/2010 3:29:09 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

 
Catastrophism
 
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
 

70 posted on 01/18/2010 4:20:14 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 69 | View Replies]

To: Bernard Marx
But a belief based on secret disappearing tablets read and interpreted by one man

No offensae intended toward anyone on this forum, but that reminds me of the origins of the LDS.

71 posted on 07/10/2010 8:46:16 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic (Southeast Wisconsin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 59 | View Replies]

To: blam
The Pleistocene - also called Anthropozoic Era or Quaternary Era or even, the Ice Age. During the Pleistocene and, more exactly, during the glacial episodes that occur at intervals of about 20 thousand years, sea levels were about 330-500 feet below their present value.

If he's going to speak of the periodicity of glaciations of the current ice age, then he needs to measure them from the beginning of one glaciation to the end of the succeeding interglacial period, then he could have more accurately written about "glacial periods that occur over intervals of roughly 110,000 years during the current, Quarternary, ice age."
72 posted on 03/26/2011 4:31:09 AM PDT by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
There is also a universality of certain ancient symbols and customs which were to be found in various ancient lands such as Egypt, Burma, India, Japan, China, the South Sea Islands, Central and South America, as well as among the aboriginal tribes of North America. They were so identical that it seemed certain that they all came from only one source.

Or the artists throughout that time were depicting a common phenomenon (the link is to a PDF of the paper).

I also don't know how he overlooked the legend of the Seven Cities of Gold or the description of the origin of the Genesis flood as "all the great fountains of the deep were broken up" (after all, most people just think of 40 days and nights of rain--though the time spent in the ark was described as being over a year in length until the waters receded enough for them to come to ground), implying great tectonic activity with resulting vulcanism and huge storms as well as tsunamis as a result.
73 posted on 03/26/2011 4:41:08 AM PDT by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: blam
You need access through a university server to get this but it looked interesting:

Special Paper 2: Maps of Pleistocene Sea Levels in Southeast Asia: Shorelines, River Systems and Time Durations
Harold K. Voris
Journal of Biogeography, 1153-1167, Vol. 27, No. 5, Sep., 2000


A table shows the percentages of time and number of years that sea level was below current level in intervals of 10 meters up to 120 meters for each of three periods of time: the past 17,000 years, the past 150,000 years, and the past 250,000 years, as well as the number of events that resulted in the lowering of the sea level to that particular depth. For the past 17,000 years, there was 1 event and the amount of time that sea level was lowered 120 meters below current level was 1000 years or 2% of the time, 100 meters, 4000 years or 24% of the time.

Here is an interesting part from the discussion section:
At 120m BPL (fig. 1a, C 17,000 yr BP), the bulk of the Sunda and Sahul shelves were largely exposed and formed massive lowland connections between present day islands in this regions and adjacent continents. Sumatra, Java and Borneo are connected by the exposed Sunda Shelf. If one considers new continuous shelf exposed south and east of the Isthmus of Kra, an additional 1.53 million sq km of land was annexed to Southeast Asia. This area is three-fouths the present day combined area of Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, the Malay Peninsula and Singapore (2.07 million sq km) (Webster's, 19980). At 120 m BL, the total newly connected area of the Sunda Shelf (in Sumatra, Java and Borneo) exceeded 3.2 million sq km, thus increasing the contiguous area of Indo-China by about 1.5 times. In addition, the islands of Hainan and Taiwan were connected to mainland China, and Sri Lanka was connect with India. Natuna Island and the other smaller island of today's South China Sea (e.g. Anambas Islands and Tambelan Archipelago) were a part of the exposed Sunda Shelf and likely offered some significant topographic relief. Although Borneo and Palawan were not connected by a land bridge at 17,000 yr BP, the Balabac Straits were reduced to a width of only about 12 km. Sulawesi remained separated from Borneo by a narrow but very deep ocean trench. To the east the exposed Sahul Shelf broadly connected Australia and New Guinea and surround the Aru Islands.

At 100m and 75m BPL (Fig. 1b, c, c. 15m000 and 13,000 yr BP), the configuration of the exposed Sunda and Sahul shelves remained very similar to the 120 m BPL arraangement and no major land connections were lost. At 75 m BLP (Fig. 1c), it is likely that one or more freshwater lakes or swamps existed at various times in depression where the Gulf of Siam is now located (Emery & Nino, 1963) and bottom cores taken off the east coast of the Malay Peninsula contained peat deposits indicating a Pleistocene peat swamp (Biswas, 1973). Furthermore, evidence of old coast lines support the presence of a brackish waster lake in the Gulf of Capentaria at about 60 m BPL (Torgensen et al,. 1985).

At 50 m BPL (Fig. 1d, c. 11,000 yr BP), extensive land bridges still connected the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Java and Borneo.
Freepmail me about this paper.
74 posted on 03/26/2011 1:27:37 PM PDT by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: aruanan

Thanks. I’ll review it later.


75 posted on 03/26/2011 2:24:39 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 74 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-75 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson