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Billy Graham: Pope Was 'Evangelist'
NewsMax ^ | 4/2/05 | Carl Limbacher

Posted on 04/02/2005 6:53:28 PM PST by wagglebee

The Reverend Billy Graham issued the following statement Saturday:

"Pope John Paul II was unquestionably the most influential voice for morality and peace in the world during the last 100 years. His extraordinary gifts, his strong Catholic faith, and his experience of human tyranny and suffering in his native Poland all shaped him, and yet he was respected by men and women from every conceivable background across the world. He was truly one of those rare individuals whose legacy will endure long after he has gone.

"It was my privilege to meet with him at the Vatican on various occasions, and I will always remember his personal warmth to me and his deep interest in our ministry. In his own way, he saw himself as an evangelist, traveling far more than any other Pope to rally the faithful and call non-believers to commitment. He was convinced that the complex problems of our world are ultimately moral and spiritual in nature, and only Christ can set us free from the shackles of sin and greed and violence. His courage and perseverance in the face of advancing age and illness were an inspiration to millions - including me.

"I have been invited to attend the funeral service for Pope John Paul II, but I will not be able to go for health reasons. I have asked a member of my family and one of my long-time associates to represent me at that service. "May his death remind each of us that some day we too must die and enter into God's presence -- and may we each commit ourselves afresh to Jesus Christ, who died and rose again for our salvation."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: billygraham; catholicism; christianity; evangelism; papacy; popejohnpaulii
"May his death remind each of us that some day we too must die and enter into God's presence -- and may we each commit ourselves afresh to Jesus Christ, who died and rose again for our salvation."

This is a beautiful tribute.

1 posted on 04/02/2005 6:53:30 PM PST by wagglebee
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To: wagglebee

Pope John Paul II and Billy Graham. Two great men. Peter and Paul.


2 posted on 04/02/2005 6:55:22 PM PST by wimpycat (Hyperbole is the opium of the activist wacko.)
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To: wagglebee

Well said. John Paul II was truly a great man for his time.


3 posted on 04/02/2005 6:58:29 PM PST by Tench_Coxe
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To: wagglebee
Yes two truly great men. May God and the Pope watch over Billy Graham as his health is deteriorating as well.
4 posted on 04/02/2005 7:00:11 PM PST by FloridianBushFan (God Bless our Troops and President Bush)
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To: wagglebee
Billy Graham, a class, and an honest one.

So9

5 posted on 04/02/2005 7:03:51 PM PST by Servant of the 9 (Trust Me)
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To: wagglebee

Billy Graham is a man with such class.


6 posted on 04/02/2005 7:04:41 PM PST by cyborg (Feel the FReeper Love)
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To: cyborg

Amen..Wonderful tribute..


7 posted on 04/02/2005 7:12:03 PM PST by MEG33 (GOD BLESS OUR ARMED FORCES)
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To: wagglebee

Amen, Brother Graham.


8 posted on 04/02/2005 7:12:59 PM PST by nhoward14
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To: FloridianBushFan
Billy Graham's words spurred me to "take the plunge", quite literally. I always believed, but never did anything about it, and one night while watching Billy Graham on TV and hearing him talk about not waiting to make yourself "presentable", but come as you are right now (his signature him is "Just As I Am"), I made the decision and was baptized not long thereafter.

John Paul II helped me to "be not afraid".

And if anyone can say JPII was an evangelist, "Billy Graham's the man who would know:

Evangelist Billy Graham took Christ at His word when He said in Mark 16:15, “Go ye into all the world and preach the Gospel to every creature.”

Mr. Graham has preached the Gospel to more people in live audiences than anyone else in history—over 210 million people in more than 185 countries and territories—through various meetings, including Mission World and Global Mission. Hundreds of millions more have been reached through television, video, film, and webcasts.

Don't forget, he had more than a 30 year head-start on the pope.

9 posted on 04/02/2005 7:15:54 PM PST by wimpycat (Hyperbole is the opium of the activist wacko.)
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To: wimpycat

"his signature him"=his signature hymn

Sheesh!


10 posted on 04/02/2005 7:16:48 PM PST by wimpycat (Hyperbole is the opium of the activist wacko.)
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To: cyborg

AND he's a fellow Tar Heel. :-)


11 posted on 04/02/2005 7:18:06 PM PST by wimpycat (Hyperbole is the opium of the activist wacko.)
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To: wagglebee

I am so happy to see the former divisions among Christians melt away. We pray for the unity of the church, and we pray that God's Name will be One.


12 posted on 04/02/2005 7:19:11 PM PST by Redmen4ever
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To: wagglebee
B'Shem Y'shua
13 posted on 04/02/2005 7:22:47 PM PST by Uri’el-2012 (Y'shua <==> YHvH is my Salvation (Psalm 118-14))
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To: Redmen4ever

Billy Graham has been a very vocal supporter of the Pope and he has even said that he has no disagreements with Roman Catholic teachings. Unfortunately, he has been sharply criticized by many Protestants for this.


14 posted on 04/02/2005 7:22:47 PM PST by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: wagglebee

You know - it really says a lot when someone (like Billy Graham or even myself) who has tremendous theological differences with the Catholic Church can still have such huge respect for someone like John Paul II.

I don't know many people who would argue with the fact that this Pope has done more for the cause of peace and for morality in the world in the last century.

As a Baptist, I tend to think in terms of "Saved" and "unsaved" or "lost", and the term Saved often doesn't get applied to Catholics in my mind (and please don't blast me for that - I'm not stirring for a fight), but if ever there has been a Catholic who I would consider to be a "Saved" man - John Paul II would definitely fit that bill. George Bush's comments were also right on track.


15 posted on 04/02/2005 7:26:34 PM PST by TheBattman (Islam (and liberals)- the cult of Satan)
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To: TheBattman

Pope John Paul II worked harder than any of his predecessors to mend rifts between Roman Catholics and Protestants. I think very few Catholics would dispute that there was a great deal of corruption in the Catholic Church that lead to the Reformation. The Pope sought to clarify that all Christians achieve salvation through faith in the Lord. Christianity is under a massive assault from the left and the Pope was very vocal in his teachings that morality is a "black and white" matter.


16 posted on 04/02/2005 7:36:24 PM PST by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: TheBattman



Catholics accept Christ as their savior why would you consider them as unsaved? trying to understand not pick a fight.


17 posted on 04/02/2005 7:44:39 PM PST by SouthernFreebird
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To: wagglebee; GatorGirl; maryz; afraidfortherepublic; Antoninus; Aquinasfan; livius; ...

Ping.


18 posted on 04/02/2005 7:48:15 PM PST by narses (St James the Moor-slayer, Pray for us! +)
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To: SouthernFreebird

It would be the difference between an inward acceptance of Jesus Christ as personal Lord and Savior, and an outward acceptance of ritual acts as supposedly sufficient to effectuate salvation. A lot of Catholics profess cluelessness when they are asked if they have accepted Jesus Christ as personal Lord and Savior, they say "hey I was baptized when a baby, that made me a Christian, what do you mean"?


19 posted on 04/02/2005 7:51:25 PM PST by The Red Zone (Go to Florida, the sun-shame state, to be schiavoed, to greer someone, and to felos a patient.)
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To: The Red Zone

You're asking for a lot here...

This is NOT the time to unleash theological arguments. Not now, please.


20 posted on 04/02/2005 8:00:38 PM PST by El Conservador ("No blood for oil!"... Then don't drive, you moron!!!)
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To: El Conservador; The Red Zone
This is NOT the time to unleash theological arguments. Not now, please.

Well said!

21 posted on 04/02/2005 8:15:55 PM PST by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: All

This Catholic thanks Billy Graham for his kind words and prays for him in his time of suffering.


22 posted on 04/02/2005 8:24:33 PM PST by Romish_Papist (God grant you rest Holy Father.)
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To: wagglebee
he has even said that he has no disagreements with Roman Catholic teachings

This is the first time I've heard this. If true, it is out of sync with biblical teachings.

23 posted on 04/02/2005 8:41:40 PM PST by k2blader (If suicide is immoral, then helping it happen, regardless of motivation, is also immoral.)
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To: k2blader

I believe he spoke about it in his recent autobiography.


24 posted on 04/02/2005 8:43:23 PM PST by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: SouthernFreebird
There are many people who sit in church pews of every denomination every Sunday and yet are "unsaved". It takes more than "being good" - none of us can be free from sin. It takes more than belief - even Satan believes Jesus is real. It takes more than singing along to nice words.

It is about personally, individually saying to Jesus, "I accept the sacrifice you made for me. I accept you as the leader of my life." Living a transformed life is what Jesus wants. And just like you do not become a football player just because you sit in the stands, you must get up and get into the game yourself.

This Baptist truely believes that this Pope felt the same way. That is why he went directly to all the people.

I do not mean to stand up an arguement (in fact I am heading to bed). I think John Paul II would like to add to all the commentary this week that he is not the source of the greatness we celebrate in his life. He was a servant that allowed God to achieve great things through him. This is what I saw in this beloved servant of Christ.

25 posted on 04/02/2005 8:49:22 PM PST by myprecious
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To: myprecious
stand up an arguement

That is "start up an argument". Time for bed.

26 posted on 04/02/2005 8:53:31 PM PST by myprecious
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To: wagglebee
This staunch Catholic is once again impressed by Graham's nobility and Christian charity.

Can't disagree with a word of what he said.

Fifty years ago, such words from an evangelical leader would have been nigh unthinkable. We've made some progress, in no small thanks to the Holy Father. And Billy Graham.

27 posted on 04/02/2005 8:59:49 PM PST by The Iguana
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To: wimpycat
Don't forget, he had more than a 30 year head-start on the pope.

Indeed.

But John Paul II did his best to make up for lost time. :-)

28 posted on 04/02/2005 9:01:39 PM PST by The Iguana
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To: wagglebee

Let me offer this: On the 500 anniversary of Luther tacking his 99 Thesis on the doors of Wurtinberg Cathedal (please forgive my factual errors, I am writing from memory), the Roman Catholic Church and the Lutheran Church of Germany entered into an agreement saying:

1. We are saved by faith alone.

2. Our good works are a sign of our joy for being saved.

3. We are in agreement on what is most important.

I would add to this, being of the Messianic Jewish persuasion, that to inquire too sharply as to the nature of God is to ask the impossible. But, this we can say, God, who in his majesty cannot be fully known to the human mind, manifested himself in the person of his son, Jesus, Yeshua. By this, which is the Good News, we are able to better know him and be assured of his love for us.



29 posted on 04/02/2005 9:02:13 PM PST by Redmen4ever
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To: wagglebee

He has bridged gaps on both sides...towards both Protestants and Jews...


30 posted on 04/02/2005 9:02:29 PM PST by Heartofsong83
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To: TheBattman
As a Baptist, I tend to think in terms of "Saved" and "unsaved" or "lost", and the term Saved often doesn't get applied to Catholics in my mind (and please don't blast me for that - I'm not stirring for a fight), but if ever there has been a Catholic who I would consider to be a "Saved" man - John Paul II would definitely fit that bill.

Well, I don't agree with your first statement (but let's leave that for another day!), wholeheartedly welcome your latter statement. THank you.
31 posted on 04/02/2005 9:02:55 PM PST by Cronos (Never forget 9/11)
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To: TheBattman
As a Baptist, I tend to think in terms of "Saved" and "unsaved" or "lost", and the term Saved often doesn't get applied to Catholics in my mind (and please don't blast me for that - I'm not stirring for a fight), but if ever there has been a Catholic who I would consider to be a "Saved" man - John Paul II would definitely fit that bill.

Given the poor state of catechesis in many American Catholic churches, I am not sure I can totally blame you.

Many a time I have met a Southern Baptist who says "I used to be a Catholic, and then I was saved." I lament their loss from the Church, but it is also clear that in many cases the church they went to was not evangelizing them.

We have a ways to go in cleaning up the mess of the last four decades. Unfortunately our dissenters, unlike yours, tend to stick around. :-)

Probably an oversight by the way, but you no doubt would add Mother Theresa to your list.

32 posted on 04/02/2005 9:05:54 PM PST by The Iguana
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To: The Iguana

Just how old is Billy Graham? Karol led a religious life since he was a teenager when he was called to God. He wasn't leading a life of Christ only for the last 26 years!


33 posted on 04/02/2005 9:10:49 PM PST by Kirkwood
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To: wagglebee
"Billy Graham has been a very vocal supporter of the Pope and he has even said that he has no disagreements with Roman Catholic teachings. Unfortunately, he has been sharply criticized by many Protestants for this."

As JPII changed attitudes toward Jews, One of the things Billy has done is to spark a re-evaluation among Conservative Protestants of the Catholic Church. The Baptist church I grew up in during the 50's was very anti-Catholic ("whore of Rome" was a term I heard from the pulpit more than once). Today that same church is still very conservatively evangelical, but this kind of talk is no longer heard, and wouldn't be tolerated.

It's helped a lot that JPII frequently speaks openly of Jesus Christ in terms of personal faith (though most of us suffer near-total disconect with the continuing heavy Marian "Mother-of-God" emphasis).

34 posted on 04/02/2005 9:15:04 PM PST by cookcounty (So just WHO bought insurance from Michael Schiavo's short-lived insurance company?)
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To: Kirkwood
He's 86. Two years older than John Paul II.

Graham actually entered ministry before the Holy Father as I understand it - Wojtyla was not ordained until 1946 (in fairness, he would have been ordained sooner save that he was dodging Nazis). Graham began preaching in the 30's.

We can say both men devoted pretty much their whole adult lives to Christ. The chief difference is that much of Wojtyla's early ministry was confined to theological education and ministry in the Krakow archdiocese. Graham was not limited by any geographical boundaries.

That's just a reflection of the ecclesial differences between the Catholic and Baptist traditions.

35 posted on 04/02/2005 9:19:23 PM PST by The Iguana
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To: Kirkwood
"Just how old is Billy Graham? Karol led a religious life since he was a teenager when he was called to God. He wasn't leading a life of Christ only for the last 26 years!"

I think Kirkwood was referring to Graham as globe-trotting evangelist, which began around 1948. John Paul's travels didn't begin until almost 30 years later.

36 posted on 04/02/2005 9:20:54 PM PST by cookcounty (So just WHO bought insurance from Michael Schiavo's short-lived insurance company?)
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To: wagglebee

Billy Graham , nice to hear him on Larry King and talk about his friendship to our beautiful John Paul 11.Billy Graham ,loved by Catholics.


37 posted on 04/02/2005 9:28:26 PM PST by fatima (John Paul II We love you.Rest in peace dear Father.We will miss you.)
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Billy is a holy man and a great evangelist. A pioneer. God bless him in his struggle; may he and the Holy Father rest together in Heaven...


38 posted on 04/02/2005 9:50:36 PM PST by D-fendr (couldn't resist..)
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To: Kirkwood

Dr. graham is 80 something, I believe.


39 posted on 04/02/2005 11:38:26 PM PST by sheik yerbouty
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To: wagglebee
Thanks for the info. Someday I may have to read his book.

I think I'd have to see exact quotes by Graham to get the full context of anything he may have said about Catholic teachings. I did a bit of googling but the most specific thing I found was this:

Graham:
The primary way of communicating is to live the life, let people see that you're living what you proclaim.... [comments on his friendship and conversations with Fulton Sheen] I lost a very dear friend, and since that time, the whole relationship between me and my work, and you and your work, and the Roman Catholic Church has changed. They open their arms to welcome us and we have the support of the Catholic Church almost everywhere we go. And I think that we must come to the place where we keep our eyes on Jesus Christ, not on what denomination or what church or what group we belong to.

Source

I'm not in disagreement with anything he said there.
40 posted on 04/03/2005 12:21:46 AM PST by k2blader (If suicide is immoral, then helping it happen, regardless of motivation, is also immoral.)
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To: The Iguana

Billy Graham was inclusive in his campaigns as early as the mid-50's, and as you suggest, he received a lot of criticism for it.



41 posted on 04/03/2005 9:46:48 AM PDT by norge
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To: The Red Zone

Thank you The Red Zone - I had just done a private reply and then found your reply. You said exactly what I was thinking.


42 posted on 04/03/2005 11:52:08 AM PDT by TheBattman (Islam (and liberals)- the cult of Satan)
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To: The Iguana

Yes Mother Therese would probably be on that list as well.

AS far as cleaning up the mess from the last four decades - make that the last 10 centuries and you would be more accurate - although the messes are very different and many of the very old problems have been addressed and some actually rectified.

As far as evangelism - I don't think I have ever heard the word used in the same sentence as Catholic! What we have to keep in mind is that above and beyond ANY belief or difference Christian sects have, the utmost important foundation or cornerstone HAS TO BE a personal faith in Jesus Christ as a VERY personal Savior. Not just someone with the title of "Son of God" who we study about in Sunday School and hear his name mentioned sometimes in the Sermon. Without this complete and total faith in Christ - NON of the other stuff matters at all - it's all as chafe on the trashing floor.

And I am not a Southern Baptist (not that there is anything particularly wrong with SBC members - especially since the convention is trying to swing the group back to the right....). I am planning to enter Seminary this Summer (Good Lord willing!).


43 posted on 04/03/2005 12:00:43 PM PDT by TheBattman (Islam (and liberals)- the cult of Satan)
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To: TheBattman
Yes Mother Therese would probably be on that list as well.

Hard to think of many who lived out the Beatitudes as well as she did.

Works like that reflect a profound and deep faith.

AS far as cleaning up the mess from the last four decades - make that the last 10 centuries and you would be more accurate - although the messes are very different and many of the very old problems have been addressed and some actually rectified.

The current mess is of course one that afflicts all Christian churches - rationalistic source theory and critical theory of Scripture; moral relativism; infection by worldly values; decline in belief in the supernatural; belief that reason is incompatible with faith.

As far as evangelism - I don't think I have ever heard the word used in the same sentence as Catholic!

Sadly, there is too much truth in what you say.

I say "sadly" not least because once upon a time, the Church lived out vigorously the evangelizing mission: from the Irish monks who evangelized Dark Age Europe, to Franciscan and Jesuit missionaries, such as Francis Xavier, who brought the message of the Gospel to millions in Latin America, Africa, and Asia, often at the cost of their lives. These missionaries are still at work (Mother Theresa's order springs to mind) but in much of the West they're out of sight, out of mind, and evangelizing that desperately needs to be going on right at home is too rarely being done.

What we have to keep in mind is that above and beyond ANY belief or difference Christian sects have, the utmost important foundation or cornerstone HAS TO BE a personal faith in Jesus Christ as a VERY personal Savior. Not just someone with the title of "Son of God" who we study about in Sunday School and hear his name mentioned sometimes in the Sermon. Without this complete and total faith in Christ - NON of the other stuff matters at all - it's all as chafe on the trashing floor.

"For I am not ashamed of the gospel; it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who has faith, to the Jew first and also to the Greek. For in it the righteousness of God is revealed through faith for faith; as it is written, 'He who through faith is righteous shall live.'" (Romans 1:16-18). Faith is the foundation of the Church. No question.

And I am not a Southern Baptist (not that there is anything particularly wrong with SBC members - especially since the convention is trying to swing the group back to the right....). I am planning to enter Seminary this Summer (Good Lord willing!).

I think I just assumed you were some stripe of evangelical.

44 posted on 04/03/2005 12:24:44 PM PDT by The Iguana
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To: SouthernFreebird

Probably due to the salvation by works theological teachings and an inclusiveness that excludes those outside of Catholicism from the possibility of salvation.


45 posted on 04/03/2005 12:36:03 PM PDT by evangmlw (")
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To: The Iguana
Why do people ignore the admonition of Jesus Christ forbidance to "call anyone on this earth father." I just never have understood how it could be justified?
46 posted on 04/03/2005 12:40:45 PM PDT by evangmlw (")
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To: The Iguana
Why do people ignore the admonition of Jesus Christ forbidance to "call anyone on this earth father." I just never have understood how it could be justified?
47 posted on 04/03/2005 12:41:40 PM PDT by evangmlw (")
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To: evangmlw
Well, because that passage is easy to misunderstand. The next verse, Matthew 23:10, says not to call anyone "teacher" ("master" in some translations). Yet no one gets worked up about that one.

In Matthew, Jesus is condemning the hypocrisy of the Pharisees. He is saying that they desire the titles of respect for their own purposes, not for the glory of God; which is certainly wrong. He is not categorically condemning the use of titles of respect, but rather the misuse of them for one’s self interests.

And of course there are many examples in the Epistles of men being called "father." In Romans Paul calls Abraham our father no less than eight times.

48 posted on 04/03/2005 2:02:39 PM PDT by The Iguana
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