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In Memoriam: Pope John Paul II
EWTN.com ^ | 04-03-05 | EWTN

Posted on 04/04/2005 9:35:52 AM PDT by Salvation

Pope John Paul II : 1920-2005- Enter site here.

In Memoriam: Pope John Paul II

 

"Well done, good and faithful servant..."



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: catholiclist; johnpaulii; memories; popejohnpaulii
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Please ~

Tributes and memories only.

1 posted on 04/04/2005 9:35:58 AM PDT by Salvation
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Comment #2 Removed by Moderator

To: All
 



3 posted on 04/04/2005 9:38:52 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All; nickcarraway; SMEDLEYBUTLER; Siobhan; Lady In Blue; attagirl; goldenstategirl; Starmaker; ...
Tribute and Memory Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Tribute and Memory Ping List.

4 posted on 04/04/2005 9:41:11 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Steven W.; Religion Moderator; Admin Moderator; Sidebar Moderator

"Holy Father"

Vicar of Christ on earth.

I guess you didn't see the admonition about tributes and memorieis only.


5 posted on 04/04/2005 9:43:31 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Image hosted by Photobucket.com

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Being moved in preparation for public viewing

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6 posted on 04/04/2005 9:49:27 AM PDT by TomGuy (America: Best friend or worst enemy. Choose wisely.)
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To: All
What really happens -- Eduation link:


 

The Vacancy of the Holy See
(Papal Interregnum)

The period between the death or resignation of a Pope and the election of his successor, when the See of Peter is vacant, is called the Interregnum. This Latin term means between the reign (of one Pope and another). It is a period governed by papal law, which admits of no changes to Church governance, or to the spiritual or material patrimony of  St. Peter, save the election of his successor.


 

 


7 posted on 04/04/2005 9:49:29 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

It was good that he was with us.


8 posted on 04/04/2005 9:49:40 AM PDT by ex-snook (Exporting jobs and the money to buy America is lose-lose..)
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To: TomGuy

Thank you for those photos.


9 posted on 04/04/2005 9:50:11 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: ex-snook
Bush to Lead U.S. Delegation to Pope's Funeral

10 posted on 04/04/2005 9:53:08 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
When Paul VI died, I was sent home early from Catholic school and I was sent home early one month later when John Paul I died and my mother got angry at me the second time because she thought I was joking when I told her why.

Then the Pope came to America and my mother went to see him. She was very impressed and moved.

Then the Pope was almost assassinated and my mother cried and I didn't know why anyone would do that.

As a teenager I remember feeling full of pride because our Holy Father (Father, that's right, Father) was staring down atheistic Communism.

I went to see him when he came to America in 1995 and I have never been in such an enormous crowd of people who were simultaneously so happy and so courteous to one another. His presence and words were quite moving.

When I was married in 1999 I went to Rome for my honeymoon and attended a papal audience. He was very weak even then and could not stand to speak, but he offered kind words in six languages and stayed past the official hour to bless a group of children from South Korea and give them rosaries.

John Paul II, pray for us.

11 posted on 04/04/2005 9:53:53 AM PDT by wideawake (God bless our brave soldiers and their Commander in Chief)
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To: Salvation

Bump! A nice thread.


12 posted on 04/04/2005 9:54:37 AM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: TomGuy

Thanks, TomGuy. That was a beautiful ceremony.


13 posted on 04/04/2005 9:55:59 AM PDT by Bahbah (Something wicked this way comes)
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To: Salvation

Good move on Bush's part.


14 posted on 04/04/2005 9:56:41 AM PDT by ex-snook (Exporting jobs and the money to buy America is lose-lose..)
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To: TomGuy
Wonderful photos. Thanks.

It was a beautiful ceremony for a great man.

15 posted on 04/04/2005 9:57:19 AM PDT by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: wideawake

What a beautiful (and funny) personal testimony.


16 posted on 04/04/2005 9:57:28 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

JPII's example of suffering with dignity and grace serves as a bright light in a very dark world. Please pray for the repose of his soul.


17 posted on 04/04/2005 9:58:36 AM PDT by Luddite Patent Counsel ("Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." - Groucho Marx)
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To: FourtySeven

Thanks.

With day two of the nine days of funerals -- there should be lots of tributes and memories. We can link them here. (Or post them.)


18 posted on 04/04/2005 9:58:56 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: TomGuy

Thank you for those pictures from one of the cubicle bound.


19 posted on 04/04/2005 10:04:27 AM PDT by ELS
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To: ELS
Page One of Rememberances


 

Mulitmedia

Justin Cardinal Rigali
Fr. Charles Connor
Fr. Jacque Daly 
Fr. Robert Fox
 Alice von Hildebrand
Fr. Andrew Apostili
 Fr. George Rutler
Fr. Spitzer
Fr. Pablo Straub
 Msgr. Eugene Clark
Fr . Rosica
Sr. Joan Noreen
Sr. Bridge McKenna
Bob & Penny Lord
Fr. John Trigilio
Fr. Robert Levis
Fr. Ho Lung
Fr. Thomas Dubay
Dr. O'Donnell
 
 "The Holy Father has given us a powerful and poignant example of how to live in the midst of personal suffering and diminishment. The pope is giving witness to the dignity and sanctity of human life, which he has championed his entire papacy."  - Bishop John F. Kinney

 "Young and old alike have drawn inspiration from Pope John Paul. As a parish priest and young bishop, he understood the importance of the young as a source of vibrancy and renewal in the Church. He carried that understanding into his papacy by establishing and attending World Youth Day celebrations, which provoked a tremendous outpouring of enthusiasm among the young. The elderly and infirm have been inspired by his indefatigable perseverance as his own physical limitations mounted.
Pope John Paul's love for the Church did not diminish his respect for other religious traditions. With his outreach to the leaders of the world's religions, he underscored the role of religion in serving world peace." -
 Bishop William S. Skylstad

"This was an extraordinary man. He was brilliant. If he had never become pope, Karol Wojtyla would have gone down, I think, as one of the major Catholic philosophers of the 20th century. ... I think that he was a strong leader, he was a brilliant guide, but more than anything else, I think, he was a man who loved people. And people understood that and people reacted to that." - Cardinal Theodore McCarrick

"The Catholic Church has lost its shepherd, the world has lost a champion of human freedom, and a good and faithful servant of God has been called home." - President George W Bush
 

"At the time when communism was breaking down, finally, and needed strong people who were prepared to push those boulders aside, and to make it possible for tyranny to end in Europe, the pope was ... one of the most important actors in that great (drama). If you look at what happened in 1989 and 1990 and 1991 you cannot but help recognize the tremendous contribution of Pope John Paul II to those dramatic events and, therefore, to freedom, and he didn't stop there. He has continued to be a voice for those who are oppressed, for those who are seeking freedom." - US Secretary of State,  Condoleezza Rice

"The forgiveness of this man -- this is huge. For him to go into the prison and meet with a man that tried to kill him and to forgive him, this is an example, of course, that Christ gave from the cross when he said, 'Forgive them, Father, for they know not what they do.' For him to go into the prison and to forgive this man and speak to him, and pray with him, was a great example to all of us. We need to forgive and move on in life, and John Paul II certainly did that -- and that is a great example to everyone." - Rev. Franklin Graham

"The death of Pope John Paul II brings to an end one of the epic stories of our time, even as it reminds us of life eternal. Both an upholder of tradition, and a breaker of tradition, Pope John Paul II did as much as anyone to liberate the victims of Communism. He was loved by all, even those who did not belong to his church. He will be mourned by the entire human family." - former President Ford.

  "The Pope has created a wealth of precedents. Without the Pope the history of Poland would have been quite different; Solidarnosc, worker struggles, the fall of communist dictatorship served as the gateway for the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989. The Pope gave Polish popular dissent a moral dignity which were crucial to the course of later events.
 
- Italian Communications Minister Maurizio Gasparri

"He took a very personal interest in the people bishops were representing... "  - Archbishop Francis Carroll

"The outpouring of love across the world is a testimony to the greatness of the pope. The pope is an inspiration to millions of Americans and people all over the world for his great moral leadership."  - Scott McClellan, White House Spokesman

"God has called home a great and saintly man. Our sorrow at John Paul II's leaving us should be tempered by the realization that he is finally at peace with the Father. I am sure he is praying for us even now, as we are praying for him." - Rep. Henry Hyde, Ill.

"His was always a voice of hope, and I think that that would be very appropriate and very fitting for anyone who was commenting about him, to tell the people, 'Be not afraid '....."  - Father Bud Roland
 

"We know what the pope has achieved. Fifty percent of the collapse of communism is his doing. After his first visit as pope to Poland, he ended Mass with a prayer for the Holy Spirit to "renew the face of the Earth," words that became a rallying cry. After that we were able to organize 10 million people for strikes, protests and negotiations. Earlier we tried and couldn't do it. These are facts. Of course, communism would have fallen, but much later and in a bloody way. He was a gift from the heavens to us."  -  Lech Walesa, founder of  Solidarity Movement

"Today we lost a hero of our age. Karol Wojtyla lived and died a warrior-saint, and we remember with joy and gratitude his service to mankind. At the news of his death, we mourn, we pray, and we bow our heads in thanks that such men ever live. He was more than a good and holy man: he was a lion." - House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, Texas.

"Pope John Paul II was a healer and a beacon of light around the world advocating for the poor, the oppressed and the unborn. He was and continues to be an inspiration to not only the 1 billion members of the Catholic Church but also to all other people of faith around the world. From the Middle East to the former Soviet Union and beyond, he will be remembered for his respect for life and liberty and his message of peace. No one in recent times has worked harder for the greater good of his fellow man than Pope John Paul II. Because of his work, the world is a better place." - House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill.


20 posted on 04/04/2005 10:10:07 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Luddite Patent Counsel
I believe he will be known as a champion for The Culture of Life.
21 posted on 04/04/2005 10:11:44 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Page Two of Remberances


 
"In the office that Cardinal Wright was responsible for, one of the ‘board of directors,’ so to speak, was Cardinal Wojtyla from Krakow; that’s how we got to know the future John Paul the Second. When I was assigned to Pittsburgh and would go to Rome with some regularity for meetings, one of the hallmarks of meeting with him always was -- when he would see me, he would always say, ‘Pittsburgh!’ It had become synonymous with my name.” -- Bishop Donald Wuerl, Diocese of Pittsburgh

"He's been a moral voice, and in that sense I think the papacy and what it represents has an even more significant role in the world than it ever had before." — Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O'Connor

"The world has lost a religious leader who was revered across people of all faiths and none. He was an inspiration, a man of extraordinary faith, dignity and courage." -British Prime Minister Tony Blair 

"Muslims worldwide respected Pope John Paul II as an advocate for justice and human rights. His message of international peace and interfaith reconciliation is one that will reverberate for decades to come. We offer our sincere condolences to members of the Roman Catholic Church and to all those who seek a more peaceful world." - Council on American-Islamic Relations

"We have lost a very important religious figure who dedicated his life to peace and justice for all. We will not forget his visit to our land and his position towards Jerusalem." - Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas

"Pope John Paul II was a global leader for a global age. Few Jews will forget his visit to the synagogue in Rome or his deeply moving pilgrimage to the Western Wall in Jerusalem. That one act of atonement for the suffering caused to Jews by the Church was one of the great healing moments of our time."  - Chief Rabbi Dr Jonathan Sacks

"Pope John Paul II ... touched the hearts of young and old, bringing tears to the eyes of those inspired by his very presence. He provided unparalleled leadership to his church and gave hope to those who had none." - Former U.S. first lady Nancy Reagan

" The Queen remembers the untiring efforts of Pope John Paul II in promoting peace and good will throughout the world. Her majesty also remembers well the work of Pope John Paul II for Christian unity including closer ties between the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches and, in particular his Holiness’s visit to Britain in 1982 – the first ever Papal visit.” - Buckingham Palace

"Pope John Paul was a leader of manifest holiness and a faithful and prayerful friend of the Anglican Church. There will be time in the days ahead for the proper tributes to be paid; for now we remember his life and ministry with thankfulness and hold the church that he led in our thoughts and prayers." -  Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Rev. Rowan Williams
 

 "In short, he was the most significant leader of our times. I'd say he was the man of the century, and at some time in the future, may he get another title, Pope John Paul the Great."  - Bishop Edward U. Kmiec

"He has been in our towns. He has driven in our streets. He has been with us and our people." — Bishop Joseph A. Galante

"He was a man of peace and he has been a great supporter of the United Nations. I recall very fondly my meetings with him, particularly sitting with him in his private quarters discussing the question of war and peace when we were thinking about what to do in Kosovo. He...(was) extremely concerned about the world we lived in, and like me, he also felt that in war, all are losers." - UN Secretary  Kofi Annan

"Pope John Paul II was unquestionably the most influential voice for morality and peace in the world during the last 100 years . His extraordinary gifts, his strong Catholic faith, and his experience of human tyranny and suffering in his native Poland all shaped him, and yet he was respected by men and women from every conceivable background across the world." - Rev. Billy Graham

“He radiated hope in an age with so little of it. He was a true disciple of Jesus Christ; and in his love and service, he invited us to be the same, and ennobled us by his example. Karol Wojtyla will be sorely missed for a very long time. In every sense, he was truly 'John Paul the Great'." - Archbishop Charles Chaput

"He had a presence that was larger than himself and I simply conclude that his will and the Lord's will were so close that the Lord could make his presence felt beyond the presence of the man.” - Bishop Eugene Gerber


"This remarkable man has been a consistent and credible champion of justice whose moral authority has been acknowledged by people of every nation and creed. As a man of peace he has called all people to respect the dignity of every human person as the only foundation for a new culture of life and civilization of love.
For the young he has been a charismatic religious leader who challenged them never to accept mediocrity and not to be afraid to be disciples of Jesus."
- Bishop Paul S. Coakley

" ... On Saturday April 2, we arrived at St. Peter's Square at about 11:30 pm. The entire Via della Concliiazione which leads into the square was a mass of humanity. People were covering the square, some kneeling, other sitting wrapped in blankets, others walking or staring at the windows of the papal apartments, which looked the same as last night... but the Pope is no longer there, only his body.
A prayer service began shortly after midnight. The Scripture readings were taken from the Feast of Divine Mercy, which is celebrated on the Sunday after Easter and was made a feast day by John Paul II, taking his inspiration from Saint Faustina Kowalska, a nun who lived in Krakow and died in 1937. The double coincidence that the Pope has died on a First Saturday and on the vigil of the Feast of Divine Mercy which he instituted is truly remarkable. I take it as a sign that the Lord has chosen the exact moment when he wanted to take John Paul II to himself.
At one point in the prayer service, one of the bishops who was speaking asked everyone to lift a round of applause up to the heavens. The entire piazza began clapping, and sustained this applause vigorously for almost ten minutes. It was quite remarkable. Towards the end of the applause, some young people began the favorite chant, "Giovanni Paolo!" and soon the entire square was calling out the name of our beloved father. The crowd then joined together in singing the Our Father in Italian. The prayer service concluded with the singing of the "Salve Regina" in Latin, an ancient hymn to Mary asking that "after this our exile" she will "show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb Jesus." A prayer that I know on this night has been answered for John Paul II. A light shone on the icon of Mary and the Christ child which John Paul himself put in the square after the assassination attempt in 1981.
About a block from St Peter's Square, all-night adoration of the Blessed Sacrament is being held at the Church of the Holy Spirit, which was dedicated by John Paul as the Sanctuary of Divine Mercy in Rome ten years ago on this feast day, Divine Mercy Sunday 1995. I attended part of a Mass there which was jammed with people. At the moment of the customary prayer for the pope during the Eucharistic prayer of the Mass, there was only a prayer for the bishops of the church and no mention of the pope...because there is no pope. Also at the time of the prayers for the dead, the priest prayed "for our brother John Paul...in baptism he died with Christ, may he also share his resurrection." That moment made things hit home for me...." - Father Peter Mitchell, a priest in Rome
 

 


22 posted on 04/04/2005 10:15:21 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

He was one of the instruments used by the Lord to bring down Soviet bolshevism. Only one of that triuvimvirate is now left, Lady Margaret Thatcher. I believe JP II's support for the Solidarity movement in Poland, coupled with his visit in 1979, started the ball rolling for the end of bolshevism in Europe and Russia. Poppa, may you see the Face of Christ and be at peace in His Kingdom. From Virginia, God bless you real good.


23 posted on 04/04/2005 11:06:17 AM PDT by Convert from ECUSA (tired of all the shucking and jiving)
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To: wideawake

When the announcement came that a Polish man had been elected Pope, I remember my Grandfather was filled with pride.
Over the years Pope John Paul II helped us to renew our faith and strive to be better Catholics.
This Pope loved Mary our Blessed Mother. This love strengthened my devotion to reciting the Rosary.
His worldwide youth conferences really touched my heart. This was a Pope who wanted to make a difference to future generations.
God Bless John Paul II (we will always love you).


24 posted on 04/04/2005 11:18:23 AM PDT by antceecee
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To: Salvation

Great post, Salvation. Thanks for the ping.


25 posted on 04/04/2005 12:57:23 PM PDT by baseballmom (Opening Day - Play Ball !!)
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To: Salvation
Thanks.

Wieczny odpoczynek racz mu dac Panie.

From Kinuk's blog:



Did your parish drape black crepe over the entrance and any portraits? Where I went yesterday in Goldsboro, NC, they did.
26 posted on 04/04/2005 1:12:15 PM PDT by Mike Fieschko
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To: Salvation

Ionnes Paulus PP.II
Karol Wajtyla
16.X.1978 - 2.IV.2005

27 posted on 04/04/2005 1:49:29 PM PDT by Smartass (Si vis pacem, para bellum - Por el dedo de Dios se escribió)
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To: Salvation

Bump for later read.


28 posted on 04/04/2005 1:58:52 PM PDT by Romish_Papist (God grant you rest Holy Father.)
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To: Salvation; All; NYer; LadyPilgrim
Thank you all!!!!!!!!!!!!{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{









































Ojczyzno ma tyles razy wekrwi skapana, jakaz wielka jest twoja rana Thank you{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{

29 posted on 04/04/2005 2:00:35 PM PDT by anonymoussierra ("Et iube me venire ad te, ut cum Sanctis tuis laudem te in saecula saeculorum. Amen.")
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To: TomGuy; All

THANK YOU ALL!!!!!!!!!!!!!{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{BE STRONG!!!!


30 posted on 04/04/2005 2:01:51 PM PDT by anonymoussierra ("Et iube me venire ad te, ut cum Sanctis tuis laudem te in saecula saeculorum. Amen.")
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To: Mike Fieschko

Wieczny odpoczynek racz mu dac Panie, na wiekow wiekow Amen!!!!!Bog Zaplac Thank you{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{


31 posted on 04/04/2005 2:05:04 PM PDT by anonymoussierra ("Et iube me venire ad te, ut cum Sanctis tuis laudem te in saecula saeculorum. Amen.")
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To: Salvation

God bless our HOly Father


32 posted on 04/04/2005 3:53:57 PM PDT by Romish_Papist (Canonize Pope John Paul the Great as patron Saint of the unborn.)
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To: anonymoussierra

Oh Sierra, I feel your hurting, as you cry for the Pope!
He was a wonderful man!

You be strong Dear One!
I will pray for you!!!

Much love for the days ahead!!!

God bless you and your Country Poland, at the time of her loss!!!!!!

He leaves this world a better place for having been here!

))))))))*HUGS*(((((((((


33 posted on 04/04/2005 4:13:47 PM PDT by LadyPilgrim (Sealed my Pardon with HIS BLOOD!!! Hallelujah!!! What a Savior)
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To: baseballmom

thanks for the bump.


34 posted on 04/04/2005 5:02:46 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: antceecee

**Over the years Pope John Paul II helped us to renew our faith and strive to be better Catholics.
This Pope loved Mary our Blessed Mother. This love strengthened my devotion to reciting the Rosary.
His worldwide youth conferences really touched my heart. This was a Pope who wanted to make a difference to future generations.**

Thanks for your family story and personal testimony.


35 posted on 04/04/2005 5:04:25 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Thank you Salvation for your consideration, especially all the pings to Catholic news. : )


36 posted on 04/04/2005 5:46:11 PM PDT by antceecee
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To: Salvation

Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine: et lux perpetua luceat eis. Te decet hymnus, Deus, in Sion, et tibi reddetur votum in Jerusalem: Exaudi orationem meam, ad te omnis caro veniet. Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat eis. Amen.

Domine Jesu Christe, Rex gloriae, libera animas omnium fidelium defunctorum de poenis inferni et de profundo lacu: libera eas de ore leonis, ne absorbeat eas tartarus, ne cadant in obscurum: sed signifer sanctus Michael repraesentet eas in lucem sanctum: quam olim Abrahae promisisti et semini ejus. Amen.

Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi: dona eis requiem.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi: dona eis requiem.
Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi: dona eis requiem sempiternam. Amen.

Joannes Paulus PP. II †
18.V.1920 - 2.IV.2005


He was my Pope. I knew no other.

Now we pray for him. Soon I will ask him to pray for us.

Eternal rest grant unto him O Lord and let the perpetual Light shine upon him. May his Soul and the souls of all the faithful departed, through the Mercy of God, rest in peace. "AMEN."


37 posted on 04/04/2005 7:11:25 PM PDT by Norman Bates (In memoriam: Pope John Paul II †, Theresa Marie Schindler †)
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To: All

38 posted on 04/05/2005 10:21:06 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice signs the Book of Rememberance at the Vatican Embassy in Washington, D.C., April 5, 2005. Rice will be attending the funeral for Pope John Paul II in Rome, Italy later during the week. REUTERS/Mannie Garcia

39 posted on 04/05/2005 3:15:16 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
"The Catholic Church has lost its shepherd, the world has lost a champion of human freedom, and a good and faithful servant of God has been called home." - President George W Bush

 


40 posted on 04/07/2005 7:40:39 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

"His leadership of the Catholic Church for more than a quarter of a century impacted the whole world; and the world now mourns the loss of this man of God whose spirit and devotion, even in the face of frail health, exemplified Jesus Christ’s own love for the Church." - Francis Cardinal George


41 posted on 04/07/2005 7:42:55 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

I was rereading a couple of books that were written back in 1978 when John Paul I and John Paul II were selected. It mentioned that an estimated 250,000 people viewed Paul VI as he lay in state. Something like 20 times as many will have viewed John Paul II by the time they shut down the viewing lines.


42 posted on 04/07/2005 7:49:56 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Non-Sequitur

I was thinking about the same thing. There was just something special about Pope John Paul II.


43 posted on 04/07/2005 8:13:18 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
A Few of FR's Finest....Every Day...04-07-05...Some of the Words of Pope John Paul II [JohnHuang2 Tribute to John Paul II]
44 posted on 04/07/2005 8:15:49 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Tribute -- SpiritDaily

FAREWELL, JOHN PAUL, YOU WERE THE BEST, A GREAT PAPA WHO WE KNOW WILL ONE DAY BE A GREAT SAINT AS WELL

By Michael H. Brown

He was always there, in the anteroom of our thoughts and prayers and in our homes and in Catholic churches, somewhere behind the quicksilver of stained glass in every parish as if to stand in guard of the Blessed Sacrament.

That's what it seemed like, at any rate, what it felt like with Joannes Paulus II, who stood as a Pope of popes, our rock, bulwark against society and the comfort in times of true Catholic tragedy -- a spiritual and yet also a world leader who will hover somewhere, some day, above names like Roosevelt and Kennedy and Churchill when history has its say and we see more clearly the way this man lived his vocation (to the hilt) and affected all of history.

He was always there, John Paul, rock of Peter, as if to guide and guard through unsettlement: for more than a quarter of a century, the one to whom we could look when the rest of the Church did not look so very good when we looked at it.

Were it not for John Paul the Great, the Catholic Church may well have collapsed under the weight of scandal; many would have lost faith.

How many vocations were solely because of John Paul, how many entered the priesthood due to his radiance? How many kept a favorable view of priests solely because he was there? And could anyone except John Paul have torn down the Berlin Wall, all but converted Gorbachev to Catholicism, and ended the tyranny of Communism (at least for the moment) -- which was the most dangerous threat to mankind in recorded history, greater even than the threat of Hitler?

Really, that's enough said. One has only to look at Pope John Paul II to see the radiance of the Holy Spirit. A vocation to the hilt! We don't need to review all the encyclicals and proclamations and declarations; there will be other times, intellectual times, for that. For now, we rejoice simply in his spirit, for this was a man who was the equal not only of any pope on record (save for Peter) but of the most devout saints, a man who will join Mother Teresa and Padre Pio and Sister Faustina -- and Lucia of Fatima -- and join them on an equal footing.

Watch the miracles that spring from his intercession!

And yet, this was also an "ordinary" man, a man who was legitimately humble, who didn't consider himself as anything special and did not exhibit the ego of the power he held. I have a good friend named William Gallagher who was once acting mayor of Niagara Falls, N.Y., and back in the 1970s, when the Pope, as Cardinal Karol Wojtyla, of Kracow, was making a tour of the U.S., Bill was given the duty of escorting this cardinal around for an entire day. I remember Bill telling me about that incredible memory of spending so much time with the future Pope, alone, even sipping wine with him -- and feeling like he was with a holy man, to be sure, but also a regular guy at the end of the day.

Years later, when he saw the list of papal candidates, Gallagher (now an outstanding television reporter in Detroit) was the only one who put his money on the Polish cardinal simply because he had met and loved and appreciated Cardinal Wojtyla -- this man who would rise not just to the Throne of Peter but to the heights of history, a martyr without succumbing.

Oh, John Paul: you did it! You succeeded like no one else! You ended it with happiness and dignity and your final word in life was "Amen"!

It doesn't get better than that and it is hard to cry for someone who dies the way John Paul II, who is in Heaven -- completely succeeding in his earthly mission, telling us to rejoice in his death (because he did).

But it is easy to cry for ourselves. It is easy to fall into the nostalgia.

He was with us. He was always with us. He showed us how we are supposed to live (and die) and now he -- papa, in the truest sense of the word papa -- is gone, at least to earthly eyes.


45 posted on 04/07/2005 10:04:57 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Ollie North

Oliver North: "Be Not Afraid"

 

April 7, 2005

Washington, D.C. -- "Be not afraid!" No better eulogy can be written for Pope John Paul II than this exhortation from his inaugural Mass on October 22, 1978. His simple statement resonated from the halls of the Kremlin to the streets of Eastern Europe, from the jungles of Central America to the oppressed tending rice paddies in Communist China. These words even touched hearts here in secular America.

Those three words -- "Be not afraid" -- from Matthew, quoting Christ's command to a group of fearful men in peril on a dark and dangerous sea -- defined who he was and what he did. At every opportunity, this man who would become the most loved, viewed, and likely one of the most feared men on earth, urged fearlessness in the face of all that life offers -- right up to death itself.

Loved? Certainly. Viewed? No doubt. More than 100 million people in 129 countries can claim to have seen him -- not on a screen -- but in person. But feared? Yes, John Paul was indeed feared by despots and dictators, the cruel and those who would deny the sanctity of human life that he espoused in every sermon and in all of his writings. His faith, strength of character, and devotion to the dignity of every person informed everything he did. Those virtues are terrifying to tyrants and can change hearts in ways that military force and economic might never can.

Best of all, his life will continue to inspire. Few know the given name of any of this pope's predecessors. But almost everyone who has ever heard of John Paul II know that he was once a parish priest, Karol Wojtyla. And because of all that has been said and written of him, hundreds of millions of people know that his courage and steadfastness were forged in the crucible of adversity -- first under the boot of Nazi oppression -- and ultimately beneath the Soviet proxies who ruled Poland after World War II.

In the early 1950s, the communist regime constructed Nowa Huta, a "model city" on the outskirts of Krakow. When Archbishop Karol Wojtyla discovered that this new "worker's paradise" wouldn't have a church, he set out to change their minds. He lobbied the apparatchiks. They ignored him. He went to the Communist Party authorities. They threatened him. So he went to the people -- and began badgering the bureaucracy for a permit to construct a place of worship. Increasingly vexed, officials vowed to restrict the annual Corpus Christi procession through Krakow to a single walk around the cathedral. The threat prompted a wonderful example of the future pope's courage and wit: "I am inclined to think that such actions do not favor the process of normalization between the Church and the State." In 1967 when the permit to build a church in Nowa Huta was finally granted, it was Archbishop Wojtyla who swung a pickaxe to break ground.

Though his message was spiritual -- not political -- the demise of the Evil Empire can be traced to his tenure as Archbishop of Krakow. Karol Wojtyla had braved threats of arrest to preach, "We are citizens of our country, the citizens of our city, but we are also a people of God which has its own Christian sensibility. ... We will continue to demand our rights. They are obvious, just as our presence here is obvious. We will demand!"



In 1979, as Pope John Paul II, he took that message back to his native Poland and inspired millions of his countrymen who ignored government intimidation to hear and see him. His message, "Be not afraid," resonated in Gdansk, with the rise of "Solidarnosc" -- Lech Walesa's famous "Solidarity" labor union. On New Year's Day 1982, less than a month after the communists in Poland declared martial law and arrested thousands of Solidarity activists, John Paul denounced the "false peace of totalitarian regimes." There was no moral equivocation. The message was clear and the result was certain: truth was superior to falsehood; the light of hope would dispel the darkness of despair; and the freedom inborn in every human being could not be crushed by all the theories, laws, and chains devised by man.

John Paul II didn't just admonish others to "Be not afraid," he lived that way himself. Though he'd nearly been killed by an assassin's bullet in 1981, he insisted on traveling again as soon as he was able. Some were critical of his decision to do so, but he was never rash or unresponsive to good advice. In 1983 while the pope was enroute to visit El Salvador, our government intercepted a communication between two FMLN terrorist cells, discussing where the Marxist guerrillas would ambush his motorcade. I was dispatched to the Papal Nuncio with the raw intercept to urge that he advise the pope to use an alternative route. He did so and the ambush was averted. As I was leaving, the Cardinal sought to reassure my concerns about sending a message to the papal aircraft by telling me, "Don't be concerned, we sent it in code. No one has ever broken the Vatican code."

By the time he left us, Pope John Paul II had faced the hectoring of Sandinista mobs in Managua, told Castro to free his people, and delivered the same message to Mikhail Gorbachev. Through it all, his life was a witness to his faith. We are poorer for his departure, but eminently better for his life. In a world that increasingly devalues human life and exalts "choice" at the altar of the self, the selfless service of Karol Wojtyla, Pope John Paul II, inspired billions and shook the foundations of the world. "Be not afraid," indeed.


46 posted on 04/07/2005 10:15:22 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Radio Address by the President to the Nation, 04-09-05 [About Pope John Paul II]



White House Radio Front Page White House Radio Front Page White House Radio Front Page

For Immediate Release
April 9, 2005

President's Radio Address

     listenAudio

THE PRESIDENT: Good morning. This week I have been in Rome to attend the funeral mass of Pope John Paul II. The ceremonies were a powerful and moving reminder of the profound impact this Pope had on our world. And on behalf of America, Laura and I were honored to pay tribute to this good and holy man.

During nearly three decades on the Chair of St. Peter, this Pope brought the gospel's message of hope and love and freedom to the far corners of the Earth. And over this past week, millions of people across the world returned the Pope's gift with a tremendous outpouring of affection that transcended differences of nationality, language and religion.

White House Radio Archives
 Radio Address
 Radio Interviews
The call to freedom that defined his papacy was forged in the experiences of Pope John Paul's own life. He came to manhood during the Nazi occupation of his beloved Poland, when he eluded the Gestapo to attend an underground seminary. Later, when he was named Poland's youngest bishop, he came face to face with the other great totalitarianism of the 20th century: Communism. And soon he taught the communist rulers in Warsaw and Moscow that moral truth had legions of its own and a force greater than their armies and secret police.

That moral conviction gave the man from Krakow a confidence that inspired millions. In 1978, when he looked out at the crowd in front of St. Peter's as their new Pope, the square rang with his words "Be Not Afraid."

Everywhere he went, the Pope preached that the call of freedom is for every member of the human family because the Author of Life wrote it into our common human nature.

Many in the West underestimated the Pope's influence. But those behind the Iron Curtain knew better, and ultimately even the Berlin Wall could not withstand the gale force of this Polish Pope.

The Pope held a special affection for America. During his many visits to our country, he spoke of our providential Constitution, the self-evident truths about human dignity enshrined in our Declaration, and the blessings of liberty that followed from them. It is these timeless truths about man, enshrined in our founding, the Pope said, that have led freedom-loving people around the world to look to America with hope and respect. And he challenged America always to live up to its lofty calling. The Pope taught us that the foundation for human freedom is a universal respect for human dignity. On all his travels, John Paul preached that even the least among us bears the image of our Creator, so we must work for a society where the most vulnerable among us have the greatest claim on our protection.

And by his own courageous example in the face of illness and suffering, he showed us the path to a culture of life where the dignity of every human person is respected, and human life at all its stages is revered and treasured.

As the Pope grew physically weaker, his spiritual bond with young people grew stronger. They flocked to him in his final moments, gathering outside his window to pray and sing hymns and light candles. With them, we honor this son of Poland who became the Bishop of Rome, and a hero for the ages.

Thank you for listening.


47 posted on 04/09/2005 10:01:04 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
INTERVIEW OF THE PRESIDENT (regarding the funeral of Pope John Paul II)
48 posted on 04/09/2005 11:56:32 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

49 posted on 04/09/2005 11:14:33 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Bush extols pontiff's 'clarity' (Pope stood strong against the tides of moral relativism)
50 posted on 04/10/2005 6:21:19 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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