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Text of the Homily at Pope's Funeral
Yahoo News ^ | April 8, 2005

Posted on 04/08/2005 9:36:53 AM PDT by NYer

Text of the homily read, in Italian, by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, dean of the College of Cardinals, during the funeral Mass of Pope John Paul II. Translation provided by the Vatican:

These are the sentiments that inspire us, Brothers and Sisters in Christ, present here in St. Peter's Square, in neighboring streets and in various other locations within the city of Rome, where an immense crowd, silently praying, has gathered over the last few days. I greet all of you from my heart. In the name of the College of Cardinals, I also wish to express my respects to Heads of State, Heads of Government and the delegations from various countries. I greet the Authorities and official representatives of other Churches and Christian Communities, and likewise those of different religions. Next I greet the Archbishops, Bishops, priests, religious men and women and the faithful who have come here from every Continent; especially the young, whom John Paul II liked to call the future and the hope of the Church. My greeting is extended, moreover, to all those throughout the world who are united with us through radio and television in this solemn celebration of our beloved Holy Father's funeral.

Follow me — as a young student Karol Wojtyla was thrilled by literature, the theater, and poetry. Working in a chemical plant, surrounded and threatened by the Nazi terror, he heard the voice of the Lord: Follow me! In this extraordinary setting he began to read books of philosophy and theology, and then entered the clandestine seminary established by Cardinal Sapieha. After the war he was able to complete his studies in the faculty of theology of the Jagiellonian University of Krakow. How often, in his letters to priests and in his autobiographical books has he spoken to us about his priesthood, to which he was ordained on Nov. 1, 1946. In these texts he interprets his priesthood with particular reference to three sayings of the Lord. First: "You did not choose me, but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last" (John 15:16). The second saying is: "The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep" (John 10:11). And then: "As the father has loved me, so I have loved you; abide in my love" (John 15:9). In these three sayings we see the heart and soul of our Holy Father. He really went everywhere, untiringly, in order to bear fruit, fruit that lasts. "Rise, Let us be on our Way!" is the title of his next-to-last book. "Rise, let us be on our way!" — with these words he roused us from a lethargic faith, from the sleep of the disciples of both yesterday and today. "Rise, let us be on our way!" he continues to say to us even today. The Holy Father was a priest to the last, for he offered his life to God for his flock and for the entire human family, in a daily self-oblation for the service of the Church, especially amid the sufferings of his final months. And this way he became one with Christ, the Good Shepherd who loves his sheep. Finally, "abide in my love:" the Pope who tried to meet everyone, who had an ability to forgive and to open his heart to all, tells us once again today, with these words of the Lord, that by abiding in the love of Christ we learn, at the school of Christ, the art of true love.

Follow me! In July 1958 the young priest Karol Wojtyla began a new stage in his journey with the Lord in the footsteps of the Lord. Karol had gone to the Masuri Lakes for his usual vacation, along with a group of young people who loved canoeing. But he brought with him a letter inviting him to call on the Primate of Poland, Cardinal Wyszynski. He could guess the purpose of the meeting: he was to be appointed as the auxiliary Bishop of Krakow. Leaving the academic world, leaving this challenging engagement with young people, leaving the great intellectual endeavor of striving to understand and to interpret the mystery of that creature which is man and of communicating to today's world the Christian interpretation of our being — all this must have seemed to him like losing his very self, losing what had become the very human identity of this young priest. Follow me — Karol Wojtyla accepted the appointment for he heard in the Church's call the voice of Christ. And then he realized how true are the Lord's words: "Those who try to make their life secure will lose it, but those who lose their life will keep it" (Luke 17:53). Our pope — and we all know this — never wanted to make his own life secure, to keep it for himself, he wanted to give of himself unreservedly, to the very last moment, for Christ and thus also for us. And thus he came to experience how everything which he had given over into the Lord's hands came back to him in a new way. His love of words, of poetry, of literature became an essential part of his pastoral mission and gave his new vitality, new urgency, new attractiveness to the preaching of the Gospel, even when it is a sign of contradiction.

Follow me! In October 1978, Cardinal Wojtyla once again heard the voice of the Lord. Once more there took place that dialogue with Peter reported in the Gospel of this Mass: "Simon, son of John, do you love me? Feed my sheep!' To the Lord's question, `Karol, do you love me?' the archbishop of Krakow answered from the depths of his heart: "Lord, you know everything: you know that I love you." The love of Christ was the dominant force in the life of our beloved Holy Father. Anyone who ever saw him pray, who ever heard him preach, knows that. Thanks to his being profoundly rooted in Christ, he was able to bear a burden which transcends merely human abilities: that of being the shepherd of Christ's flock, his universal Church. This is not the time to speak of the specific content of this rich pontificate. I would like only to read two passages of today's liturgy which reflect the central elements of his message. In the first reading, St. Peter says — and with St. Peter, the pope himself — "I truly understand that God shows no partiality, but in every nation anyone who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him. You know the message he sent to the people of Israel, preaching peace by Jesus Christ — he is Lord of all" (Acts of the Apostles 10:34-36). And in the second reading, St. Paul — and with St. Paul, our late Pope — exhorts us, crying out: "My brothers and sisters, whom I love and long for, my joy and my crown, stand firm in the Lord in this way, my beloved" (Philippians 4:1).

Follow me! Together with the command to feed his flock, Christ proclaimed to Peter that he would die a martyr's death. With those words, which conclude and sum up the dialogue on the love and on the mandate of the universal shepherd, the Lord recalls another dialogue, which took place during the Last Supper. There Jesus had said: "Where I am going, you cannot come." Peter said to him, "Lord, where are you going?" Jesus replied: "Where I cam going, you cannot follow me now: but you will follow me afterward." (John 13:33-36). Jesus from the Supper went toward the Cross, went toward his Resurrection — he entered into the paschal mystery; and Peter could not follow him. Now — after the Resurrection — comes the time, comes this "afterward." By shepherding the flock of Christ, Peter enters into the paschal mystery, he goes toward the cross and the Resurrection. The Lord says this in these words: "`....when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go; (John 21:18) In the first years of his pontificate, still young and full of energy, the Holy Father went to very ends of the Earth, guided by Christ. But afterward, he increasingly entered into the communion of Christ's sufferings; increasingly he understood the truth of the words: "Someone else will fasten a belt around you." And in the very communion with the suffering Lord, tirelessly and with renewed intensity, he proclaimed the Gospel, the mystery of that love which goes to the end (John 13:1).

He interpreted for us the paschal mystery as a mystery of divine mercy. In his last book, he wrote: The limit imposed upon evil "is ultimately Divine Mercy" ("Memory and Identity," p. 60-61). And reflecting on the assassination attempt, he said: "In sacrificing himself for us all, Christ gave a new meaning to suffering, opening up a new dimension, a new order: the order of love. ... It is this suffering which burns and consumes evil with the flame of love and draws forth even from sin a great flowering of good." Impelled by this vision, the pope suffered and loved in communion with Christ, and that is why the message of his suffering and his silence proved so eloquent and so fruitful.

Divine Mercy: the Holy Father found the purest reflection of God's mercy in the Mother of God. He who at an early age had lost his own mother, loved his divine mother all the more. He heard the words of the crucified Lord as addressed personally to him: "Behold your Mother." And so he did as the beloved disciple did: he took her into his own home;" (John 19:27)

_ Totus tuus. And from the mother he learned to conform himself to Christ.

None of us can ever forget how in that last Easter Sunday of his life, the Holy Father, marked by suffering, came once more to the window of the Apostolic Palace and one last time gave his blessing urbi et orbi. We can be sure that our beloved pope is standing today at the window of the Father's house, that he sees us and blesses us. Yes, bless us, Holy Father. We entrust your dear soul to the Mother of God, your Mother, who guided you each day and who will guide you now to the eternal glory of her Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: catholic; funeral; homily; johnpaulii; pope; popejohnpaulii; ratzinger; transcript; vatican
Who would ever have imagined that so many leaders would come together to thank this humble servant of God.


Iranian President Mohammad Khatami (R) the funeral of Pope John Paul II in St Peter's Square at the Vatican City. The pope's funeral mass drew a veritable United Nations of world leaders, from Afghan President Hamid Karzai to President Vicente Fox of Mexico.(AFP/File/Vincenzo Pinto)

1 posted on 04/08/2005 9:36:54 AM PDT by NYer
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To: american colleen; Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; ...
"Follow me." The Risen Lord says these words to Peter. They are his last words to this disciple, chosen to shepherd his flock.


Cardinals sit during the funeral of Pope John Paul II in the Vatican's St. Peter's Square April 8, 2005. The poor and the powerful of the earth rubbed shoulders to say their last goodbye to the Pope on Friday as the Vatican staged one of the most momentous funerals in history for the Polish Pontiff. REUTERS/Stefano Rellandini

Catholic Ping - Please freepmail me if you want on/off this list


2 posted on 04/08/2005 9:41:21 AM PDT by NYer ("America needs much prayer, lest it lose its soul." John Paul II)
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To: sandyeggo; St. Johann Tetzel; Pyro7480; Cronos; Kolokotronis; Siobhan; Father; tlRCta; ...

One of the leaders of the Oriental churches bends down to retrieve a cardinal's skull cap, blown off in the wind, during the funeral mass for Pope John Paul II in St.Peter's Square at the Vatican, Friday, April 8, 2005. (AP Photo/Pier Paolo Cito)


A priest leads a mass commemorating the late Pope John Paul II at the Holy Family Church in Ramallah April 8, 2005. The poor and the powerful of the earth rubbed shoulders to say their last goodbye to Pope John Paul on Friday as the Vatican staged one of the most momentous funerals in history for the Polish Pontiff. REUTERS/Loay Abu Haykel

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3 posted on 04/08/2005 9:45:52 AM PDT by NYer ("America needs much prayer, lest it lose its soul." John Paul II)
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To: NYer
He interpreted for us the paschal mystery as a mystery of divine mercy. In his last book, he wrote: The limit imposed upon evil "is ultimately Divine Mercy" ("Memory and Identity," p. 60-61). And reflecting on the assassination attempt, he said: "In sacrificing himself for us all, Christ gave a new meaning to suffering, opening up a new dimension, a new order: the order of love. ... It is this suffering which burns and consumes evil with the flame of love and draws forth even from sin a great flowering of good." Impelled by this vision, the pope suffered and loved in communion with Christ, and that is why the message of his suffering and his silence proved so eloquent and so fruitful.

4 posted on 04/08/2005 9:48:58 AM PDT by Siobhan ( John Paul the Great, Apostle of the Gospel of Life, pray for us. )
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To: NYer

LOL - will you stop! ;) Seriously, I love all your posts. I keep trying to leave the FR. I have a terrible migraine and need to get away from the screen. But your posts keep beckoning me back! Thanks for this. I missed much of what he said simply because I was crying so much.


5 posted on 04/08/2005 9:51:19 AM PDT by CitizenM ("Rise, let us be on our way" - Pope John Paul, II (noted in Ratzinger's Homily@ PJPII's Requiem))
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To: CitizenM; sandyeggo; Siobhan; Pyro7480

Poles dressed in the traditional clothing of the country's highland region bring a gift to the funeral Mass for Pope John Paul II at the Vatican's St. Peter's Square April 8, 2005. The poor and powerful joined in a final farewell to Pope John Paul on Friday at a momentous Vatican funeral watched by hundreds of millions of people across the world he had travelled. REUTERS/Yves Herman

(Notice Mar Nasrallah Boutros Cardinal Sfeir, Patriarch of the Maronite Church with black hood.)

6 posted on 04/08/2005 9:53:51 AM PDT by NYer ("America needs much prayer, lest it lose its soul." John Paul II)
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To: NYer
These words seem to be omitted from the beginning in this translation per EWTN.

“Follow me. “ The Risen Lord says these words to Peter. They are his last words to this disciple, chosen to shepherd his flock. “Follow me” - this lapidary saying of Christ can be taken as the key to understanding the message which comes to us from the life of our late beloved Pope John Paul II. Today we bury his remains in the earth as a seed of immortality - our hearts are full of sadness, yet at the same time of joyful hope and profound gratitude.


=============

Still words to the wise 'follow me'.

7 posted on 04/08/2005 10:00:16 AM PDT by ex-snook (Exporting jobs and the money to buy America is lose-lose..)
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To: NYer
Yes, bless us, Holy Father. We entrust your dear soul to the Mother of God, your Mother, who guided you each day and who will guide you now to the eternal glory of her Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

Excellent ending.
`

8 posted on 04/08/2005 10:01:36 AM PDT by AFPhys ((.Praying for President Bush, our troops, their families, and all my American neighbors..))
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To: AFPhys

Isn't that just the most beautiful ending to an excellent homily.


9 posted on 04/08/2005 10:13:43 AM PDT by Siobhan ( John Paul the Great, Apostle of the Gospel of Life, pray for us. )
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To: NYer


Syrian President Bashar al-Assad (top center) and Israeli President Moshe Katsav (left center) stand among other dignitaries during the funeral of Pope John Paul II at the Vatican, April 8, 2005. Israel's president said he shook hands with the leaders of Syria and Iran at the funeral Friday when in his death Pope John Paul brought together Middle East foes as no man alive ever had.
10 posted on 04/08/2005 10:20:42 AM PDT by visualops (God, our Father, we ask You to look with mercy and love on Your servant John Paul. Amen.)
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To: NYer

Thanks for posting. I did not get to see the homily and had heard it was very good.


11 posted on 04/08/2005 11:12:07 AM PDT by KEmom (Please send viable Republican candidates to Massachusetts!!)
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To: NYer

Bump for Ratzinger as the next Pope!


12 posted on 04/08/2005 12:00:07 PM PDT by Tantumergo
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To: Tantumergo

Bump for Arinze as the next pope!


13 posted on 04/08/2005 1:45:41 PM PDT by NYer ("America needs much prayer, lest it lose its soul." John Paul II)
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To: NYer

Bump for a new Pope who is a Good & Faithful Servant! :-)


14 posted on 04/08/2005 1:46:59 PM PDT by tiredoflaundry (My quaker parrot can talk, can Your honor student fly?)
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To: NYer

Thanks NYer.I fell asleep at homily:)and woke up as soon as it was done.


15 posted on 04/08/2005 1:55:00 PM PDT by fatima (John Paul II We love you.Rest in peace dear Father.We will miss you.)
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To: NYer

Question: In the Latin Mass, is the homily always in Latin, too?


16 posted on 04/08/2005 1:56:52 PM PDT by kms61
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To: NYer

Bump!


17 posted on 04/08/2005 2:18:30 PM PDT by TotusTuus (Christos Voskrese!)
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To: kms61
Question: In the Latin Mass, is the homily always in Latin, too?

Good question!

In the Latin Mass, the homily is delivered in the vernacular. Cardinal Ratzinger demonstrated his command of the Italian language this morning, albeit with a German accent ;-D.

BTW - the Gospel is normally read in the vernacular as well, but it was chanted in Latin today.

18 posted on 04/08/2005 3:00:49 PM PDT by NYer ("America needs much prayer, lest it lose its soul." John Paul II)
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To: Siobhan
He interpreted for us the paschal mystery as a mystery of divine mercy. In his last book, he wrote: The limit imposed upon evil "is ultimately Divine Mercy" ("Memory and Identity," p. 60-61). And reflecting on the assassination attempt, he said: "In sacrificing himself for us all, Christ gave a new meaning to suffering, opening up a new dimension, a new order: the order of love. ... It is this suffering which burns and consumes evil with the flame of love and draws forth even from sin a great flowering of good."

I just wanted to see this again...I will remember it forever.

19 posted on 04/08/2005 9:16:38 PM PDT by Dolphy
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To: kms61
In the Novus Ordo Mass, the readings can be in Latin but tend to be in the local language.

The Tridentine Mass (Traditional Latin Mass) readings are all in Latin. However, prior to the sermon/homily the priest usually reads a translation of the Epistle and Gospel judging by the Masses I have attended and others have told me.
20 posted on 04/08/2005 10:25:07 PM PDT by PRSOrlando
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bttt


21 posted on 04/12/2005 7:46:03 PM PDT by Coleus (I support ethical, effective and safe stem cell research and use: adult, umbilical cord, bone marrow)
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