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Protesters proclaim 'Japanese invaders must die'
NZ Herald ^ | 16.04.05 | na

Posted on 04/17/2005 6:30:46 AM PDT by Flavius

SHANGHAI/BEIJING - Shouting "Japanese invaders must die", thousands protested against Japan's wartime past in eastern China on Saturday, hurling rocks and bottles and burning Japanese flags at Tokyo's consulate in Shanghai.

However, with thousands of paramilitary police on the streets of Beijing and students warned against protesting, authorities appeared to have headed off a repeat of last weekend's demonstrations in the capital, which will host Japan's foreign minister on Sunday.

Police also barred demonstrations in southern Guangzhou and southwestern Chongqing, where thousands took to the streets last weekend.

Chinese have been protesting against textbooks they see as whitewashing Japan's wartime past, and against Tokyo's bid for a permanent seat on the UN Security Council.

In the third weekend of violent protests against Japan across China, thousands marched on the Japanese consulate in Shanghai, smashing windows with rocks, pelting it with paint bombs and attacking Japanese restaurants along the way.

Marchers set fire to the red-and-white Japanese flag. Some held posters carrying messages such as "Face Up to History", while another warned: "The anti-Japan war is not over yet".

A Japanese car was overturned by protesters, left covered with scratches and "Boycott Japan" scrawled on its side.

Hundreds of paramilitary police in full riot gear stood ready as police appealed for order on loud hailers. Isolated scuffles broke out and about a dozen protesters were dragged away.

During moments of relative calm, protesters and police alike were spotted buying lattes at a nearby coffee shop.

In the scenic eastern city of Hangzhou, about 10,000 protesters chanted anti-Japanese slogans, carried banners and handed out fliers calling for a boycott of Japanese goods, witnesses said. Journalists were told not to report on it and warned they would be sacked if they took part.

Billboards featuring Japanese electronics goods were covered up in Hangzhou as were restaurant signs in Beijing. Another 2,000 people marched in Tianjin city, near the capital.

In Beijing, hundreds of police in riot gear secured the ambassador's home in the northeast diplomatic district and the embassy in the southeast. Both were hit by rocks and bottles by thousands of protesters last weekend but spared this time around.

China appears keen to keep the capital quiet.

Japanese Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura is due to meet his counterpart Li Zhaoxing on Sunday, and aims to ensure disputes on everything from gas exploration in disputed waters to Japan's history do not hurt $US178 billion ($NZ249.75 billion) in annual trade between the economic powers.

Japan has pledged not to let the series of disputes hinder their broader relationship.

Many Chinese fume at what they see as Japan's failure to own up to atrocities committed during its occupation of China from 1931 to 1945. Beijing estimated that up to 35 million Chinese were killed or wounded by invading Japanese troops.

Anger flared after Tokyo's approval this month of a history textbook written by Japanese nationalist scholars that many in Asia say glosses over Japan's wartime past.

After last weekend's protests, the situation worsened on Wednesday after Japan announced it had started procedures to allocate rights for test-drilling in a disputed area of the East China Sea.

China has come under fire for tacitly encouraging the unrest, which started in Guangdong and Sichuan provinces early this month, spread to Beijing last week and, now, to nearby Tianjin and Shanghai and Hangzhou on the east coast.

Beijing denies it deliberately allowed things to spiral and pledged to protect Japanese businesses and nationals in China.

"I have to point out here that such allegations are totally groundless and a serious distortion of truth," State Councillor Tang Jiaxuan, a former foreign minister, said.

Tang blamed the tensions on repeated visits by Japanese leaders, including Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, to the Yasukuni shrine -- where convicted war criminals are honoured along with Japan's war dead.

Authorities appeared to be clamping down harder in Beijing to keep the capital peaceful during Machimura's visit. University students were warned by email not to protest.

The South China Morning Post in Hong Kong quoted unidentified sources as saying top anti-Japanese activists in Beijing were rounded up to prevent protests. One activist, Hu Jian, was put under house arrest on Friday, it said.

In Japan, Kyodo news agency said an envelope containing harmless starch-like white powder was sent to the Chinese Embassy in Tokyo on Friday. Private broadcaster TV Tokyo said on Saturday a caller had rung the embassy, threatening to blow it up. Police would not confirm either incident.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: china; japan; northeastasia

1 posted on 04/17/2005 6:30:47 AM PDT by Flavius
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Comment #2 Removed by Moderator

Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

To: Flavius
Are they calling it their "Leichsklistallnacht" already?
4 posted on 04/17/2005 6:40:49 AM PDT by cartan
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To: Flavius

Don`t you wish our own liberals were as calm as the Chinese?


5 posted on 04/17/2005 6:41:24 AM PDT by Imaverygooddriver (ALL YOU BASE ARE BELONG TO US)
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To: Flavius
Government detects grassroots pressure cooking, attempts to relieve it while diverting it into politically advantageous channel.
If a billion Chinese go far enough along with this insanity, the world is in for a long night.
6 posted on 04/17/2005 6:45:07 AM PDT by Graymatter (a Terri Schiavo Republican)
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To: Flavius

Sounds like it's time for Japan to rebuild their military.


7 posted on 04/17/2005 6:48:30 AM PDT by cripplecreek (I'm apathetic but really don't care.)
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To: cripplecreek
"Sounds like it's time for Japan to rebuild their military."

I just can't help but think that this is all really about the Pot-Bellied-Pig of Pyongyang. The Chi-Coms are using him to intimidate us so perhaps we are responding in kind by encouraging the Japanese to take a more aggressive stance in the region.

8 posted on 04/17/2005 6:55:29 AM PDT by trek
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To: Imaverygooddriver

Liberals like communism. They should go over and take lessons.


9 posted on 04/17/2005 6:57:51 AM PDT by Piquaboy (22 year veteran of the Army, Air Force and Navy, Pray for all our military .)
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To: Flavius

This pretty much settles it in my mind......the Chinese are CLEARLY looking to incite old WWII animosities between N and S Koreans (which are equal, regardless whether N or S) against Japan.

China is no ally, and I doubt seriously if it has any interest in the N Korea "problem".....this is all a game, financed with MFN status and Wal-Mart, etc.


10 posted on 04/17/2005 7:10:20 AM PDT by Vn_survivor_67-68
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To: Graymatter
I think thats exactly whats happening here. The civilian anger is being manipulated and funnelled against the Japanese. That is one risky strategy though. Because how long before the anger is re-directed? And by then you have a civilian populace that have pretty much perfected their breaking glass and throwing rocks skills.

What then? Start shooting your own people again? That'll play real well with the population. By that time they will have figured out that they wield a lot of power as well.

China is playing with fire, but I'd have to think that if they're letting this happen it's because they have no choice, and letting the rioters vent some steam is the best option they have left to play.

11 posted on 04/17/2005 7:10:31 AM PDT by libs_kma (USA: The land of the Free....Because of the Brave!)
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To: libs_kma
I suspect the people's agitation was detected, and the govt decided to channel it into something useful before it crystallized into anti-government sentiment. However, the choice of Japan was not random. Japan stands in the way of China's long-range plans. The operating formula here is "First villainize, then victimize."
12 posted on 04/17/2005 7:18:32 AM PDT by Graymatter (a Terri Schiavo Republican)
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To: Flavius
"The anti-Japan war is not over yet".

Between this and the legislation vis-a-vis Taiwan, Hu is rapidly filling in the question marks about his plans for the Chinese future. Rather than being the "liberal" that so many commentators saw in the blank slate of his past, he is rapidly becoming an "imperialist". BTW, several Thai/Chinese I know, see war with any Asian country who resists China's "destiny" as being inevitable and highly desirable.

13 posted on 04/17/2005 7:20:11 AM PDT by JimSEA
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To: Flavius

Here in the States we've been distracted by other things but the real show is starting up in China. I'm pretty sure that we are not going to like what the Chinese government is cooking up.


14 posted on 04/17/2005 8:10:56 AM PDT by thathamiltonwoman
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To: Flavius
Chinese have been protesting against textbooks they see as whitewashing Japan's wartime past..

Brainwashed Chinese who haven't gotten the word their own government is just as bad or worse than the evils of Japans past.
15 posted on 04/17/2005 8:14:22 AM PDT by TheForceOfOne
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To: cartan

It was called Kristallnacht (German for "crystal night") by the common people evoking the many shop windows, mostly owned by Jewish shopkeepers, that were broken during the night....


16 posted on 04/17/2005 8:28:05 AM PDT by traumer
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To: Flavius

Looks to me like China created a monster they can't control. I believe THEY instigated the protest when they first began. Now they are getting out of hand. Well, you know what they say, be careful what you wish for...


17 posted on 04/17/2005 8:32:45 AM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: Graymatter

Yup.
Starting with the 40,000,000 idle frustrated young chinese men that cannot find wives....
They could create the core (STORMTRUPPEN) of the attack force.


18 posted on 04/17/2005 8:34:41 AM PDT by traumer
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To: Flavius
Although outwardly troubling, this is a positive sign. The PRC must be in deep doo-doo if it is resorting to state sanctioned patriotic anti-Tojo hyperbole as a pressure relief valve. They are seeking to project all economic and social problems on the pre-communist past and the atrocities as the reason they are not the preeminent super power today. The laughable point is that the ones they are protesting about were soundly defeated by the ones they resent the most - the US.
19 posted on 04/17/2005 8:36:51 AM PDT by Natural Law
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To: Flavius
“China has come under fire for tacitly encouraging the unrest”

Of course the Communists are behind this unrest. You just don’t have spontaneous demonstrations in totalitarian regimes such as Communist China. Don’t think for one minute the Chinese people give a care what is printed in Japanese schoolbooks.

Chinese Communists are chess players and are looking about five moves ahead with this. These demonstrations are leading up to something and it has very little to do with how history is taught in Japanese schools.

20 posted on 04/17/2005 8:38:27 AM PDT by DJ Taylor (Once again our country is at war, and once again the Democrats have sided with our enemy.)
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To: Vn_survivor_67-68

Bingo.


21 posted on 04/17/2005 8:40:19 AM PDT by hershey
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To: Flavius

whenever the ethnic and religious masses of chinese stray too far from the reservation,

the chicoms bring them back into line by means of

nationalism.


22 posted on 04/17/2005 8:44:09 AM PDT by ken21 (if you didn't see it on tv, then it didn't happen. /s)
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To: hershey

DISAPPROVAL OF MOST-FAVORED-NATION TREATMENT FOR CHINA (House of Representatives - July 22, 1998)

http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/congress/1998_cr/h980722-mfn2.htm

and

http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/library/congress/1998_cr/h980722-mfn1.htm


23 posted on 04/17/2005 8:49:50 AM PDT by Vn_survivor_67-68
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To: pbrown

SUN-TZU: "When you start a fire, be to windward of it..."

http://www.yuni.com/library/suntzu.htm


24 posted on 04/17/2005 8:53:59 AM PDT by traumer
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To: Vn_survivor_67-68

Maintaining normal trade relations with China - most favored nation status should continue - Madeleine Albright, Secretary of State - Transcript
US Department of State Dispatch, June, 1997

(a short snip):

Mr. Chairman, there is no greater opportunity -- or challenge -- in U.S. foreign policy today than to encourage China's integration as a fully responsible member of the international system. President Clinton's decision to extend most-favored-nation or normal trade relations with China reflects our commitment to this goal.

At the same time, the Administration fully shares many of the concerns expressed in Congress and elsewhere about some Chinese policies and practices. Principled criticism of Chinese actions that offend our values or run counter to our interests is vital -- because it demonstrate that the concerns we address through our diplomacy are deeply rooted in the convictions of the American people.

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1584/is_n5_v8/ai_19660675


25 posted on 04/17/2005 8:54:17 AM PDT by Vn_survivor_67-68
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To: Flavius

When the Japanese look up again after playing pachinko they'll see their world is changing.


26 posted on 04/17/2005 8:56:05 AM PDT by Semper Paratus (-)
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To: Vn_survivor_67-68

This about Taiwan.


27 posted on 04/17/2005 8:57:24 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: traumer

I have bookmarked this thread to read your links. Thanks for posting them.


28 posted on 04/17/2005 9:13:19 AM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: Flavius

When the demos first started , it looked like China was playing "Diplomatic shadow boxing"

Now, as the demos heat up, it looks like they are using "diplomatic shaolin kungfu". Shaolin is the "Hard or external" system of kungfu as opposed to the "soft" (subtle) systems like Tai-Chi, Paqua or even Wudan

Can they achieve their diplomatic objectives ?


29 posted on 04/17/2005 9:14:02 AM PDT by Wudan Master
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To: Flavius

The headlines are wrongly translated

The correct one should read

"The Japanese Invaders (of 1937-1945) deserved their deaths"


30 posted on 04/17/2005 9:20:39 AM PDT by Wudan Master
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To: Vn_survivor_67-68

We need to find other places to purchase products from.
Its nuts to be pumping all of this money into China when they are doing the strategic things that they are doing. China is not our friend.
The things that China sells us can be made in many countries around the globe; we need to start finding them.


31 posted on 04/17/2005 9:20:59 AM PDT by HereInTheHeartland
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To: Wudan Master
Now, as the demos heat up, it looks like they are using "diplomatic shaolin kungfu". Shaolin is the "Hard or external" system of kungfu as opposed to the "soft" (subtle) systems like Tai-Chi, Paqua or even Wudan

Sounds very Zin to me.

32 posted on 04/17/2005 9:25:15 AM PDT by processing please hold (Islam and Christianity do not mix ----9-11 taught us that)
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To: pbrown


You meant to say "ZEN", of course


33 posted on 04/17/2005 9:30:36 AM PDT by Wudan Master
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To: HereInTheHeartland

"The things that China sells us can be made in many countries"

Yeah....such as the USA.....why we shipped our jobs and industrial base/brick/mortar to them in such a massive and sudden way is stupid and even subversive......and soon we will no longer be able to deny those facts.


34 posted on 04/17/2005 9:32:49 AM PDT by Vn_survivor_67-68
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To: Flavius

Of course, it would seem like the Japanese started to play the game called "Baiting the Dragon"

Now, maybe we are seeing the first part of China's response


35 posted on 04/17/2005 9:40:56 AM PDT by Wudan Master
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To: Flavius

The Beijing rent a mob


36 posted on 04/17/2005 5:14:00 PM PDT by virgil
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