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Secret Film of Classrooms Reveals World of Swearing and Porn (UK)
Telegraph (UK) ^ | 4/27/2005 | Becky Barrow

Posted on 04/27/2005 10:23:30 AM PDT by Pyro7480

Secret film of classrooms reveals world of swearing and porn
By Becky Barrow

A documentary to be screened tonight offers a withering portrayal of the education system.

It shows pupils swearing in class, searching for porn on the internet, assaulting each other and refusing to co-operate with or respect their teachers.

After a 30-year gap from teaching, a supply teacher using the pseudonym Sylvia Thomas returned to 14 secondary schools in London and the North over an eight-month period.

She secretly filmed her experiences using a camera hidden in her briefcase and a microphone disguised as a jacket button.

Her experiences, chronicled in Classroom Chaos on Channel 5, will disturb parents who already suspect that their children are receiving a far from perfect education. At the end of her first day, the teacher describes how she went home and "sobbed my heart out, thinking: 'Is this what education has come to?' "

During an English lesson with year 9 pupils, which begins with several boys punching each other and swearing, a pupil responds to her attempts to discipline him by saying: "I'll come to your house and blow you up."

In another lesson, after several attempts to make pupils be quiet, a boy's voice can be heard calling out: "Suck me off, Miss."

A pupil aged 11 or 12 swears after being asked to be quiet and the teacher says: "Do not talk to me like that, please." He replies: "Don't talk to me like that - I've got my rights, you know."

Pupils drift into lessons, sometimes 15 minutes late. They use mobiles and hide under desks. They arrive with crisps and other food despite notices on the doors prohibiting eating or drinking during the lesson. They get up and leave lessons despite being told to sit down.

More than all the swearing and the disruption, it is the constant level of noise that may take viewers aback. When one class is silent and working hard, the teacher says she finds it "eerie" because it is such a change.

Of the six lessons that Miss Thomas teaches at one school, she estimates that pupils learn something in only two of them. The rest are lost to "low-level disruption" or worse.

Miss Thomas says that when she was teaching in large state secondary schools in the 1970s, "being cheeky" meant nothing more serious than whispering in the back row. During her recent experience she was shocked to discover that one school, which is not alone, had a police officer based on the premises.

When a boy is searching for pornography on the internet, he says to the teacher: "I just typed in anal, didn't I?". The police officer is summoned.

Miss Thomas said that in the past she "kept control of the class without ever needing to resort even to shouting". After her recent experiences, she was often hoarse at the end of a day's work.

The one encouraging note struck in the documentary, which was produced by the award-winning film maker Roger Graef, was the Sir John Cass Foundation school in Tower Hamlets, east London. It has been transformed by the headmaster's strict disciplinary policy.

Ten years ago few pupils returned after the lunch break, which lasted for 90 minutes. Now the lunch break is shorter and everybody comes back.

Miss Thomas admits that she could simply be accused of being incompetent, having been out of the profession for three decades. Working as a supply teacher, with subjects of which she has little or no experience, does not help.

But when she puts that point to other teachers, one replies: "Most teachers would watch that and say, 'I am not surprised. I am not shocked. That is my life.' "


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: britain; classrooms; education; porn; schools; swearing; uk
They will have similar results if they did the same thing in the U.S., unfortunately.
1 posted on 04/27/2005 10:23:35 AM PDT by Pyro7480
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To: Pyro7480

They will have similar results if they did the same thing in the U.S., unfortunately.
======
And is that any suprise when you consider WHO AND WHAT are running our education systems??? Hardly.


2 posted on 04/27/2005 10:28:26 AM PDT by EagleUSA (q)
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To: Pyro7480
 a supply teacher... They use mobiles... They arrive with crisps... being cheeky...
 
The Brits are so cute when they try to speak english.
Owl_Eagle

(If what I just wrote makes you sad or angry,

 it was probably sarcasm)

3 posted on 04/27/2005 10:30:21 AM PDT by South Hawthorne (In Memory of my Dear Friend Henry Lee II)
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To: Pyro7480

A pupil aged 11 or 12 swears after being asked to be quiet and the teacher says: "Do not talk to me like that, please." He replies: "Don't talk to me like that - I've got my rights, you know."

Kids have more rights than adults and they know it. No wonder the prison population is growing especially among juveniles. Take God out of society and have no standards of right and wrong and tell parents they can't discipline their kids and this is what you have.


4 posted on 04/27/2005 10:33:48 AM PDT by exzoomie
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To: Pyro7480

In SOME schools in the US, they would call watching porn in the classroom educational and quiz you on what you saw.


5 posted on 04/27/2005 10:36:31 AM PDT by teletech (Friends don't let friends vote DemocRAT)
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ping to self for later pingout.


6 posted on 04/27/2005 10:36:35 AM PDT by little jeremiah (Resisting evil is our duty or we are as responsible as those promoting it.)
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To: Pyro7480

So exactly what are the consequences of their actions? there are none. A lesson they have learned all too well.


7 posted on 04/27/2005 10:37:15 AM PDT by SF Republican
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To: Pyro7480
They will have similar results if they did the same thing in the U.S., unfortunately.

In some places yes, in other places no. My wife does substitute teaching in a district where the kids are generally well-behaved, and the school environment is very good. Not surprisingly, the "clientele" for this school district tend to come from families where one or both parents are professionals.

By contrast, my daughter attends a school where the general student population sounds similar to what's described here. The atmosphere of her school is not nice (which is why we're home-schooling her next year). And, not surprisingly, the troublemakers are generally from single-parent and non-professional families.

Which is to say: although it's easy to blame the schools for this stuff, the primary problem is the culture from which the students come. Following from that is the response of the school to those who disrupt -- but again, there's not much they can do if the kids are required to be there, and their parents don't give a damn.

8 posted on 04/27/2005 10:38:07 AM PDT by r9etb
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To: Pyro7480
They will have similar results if they did the same thing in the U.S., unfortunately

That kind of behaviour isn't tolerated at my school, a public middle school in Michigan.

Mike

9 posted on 04/27/2005 10:39:10 AM PDT by MichaelP
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To: Pyro7480

My wife has taught in London state schools and provincial schools. We moved out of London so our kids wouldn't have to go to a state school there. Great place to live as a single person, but not for families. I doubt London schools are indicative of the average state school in the uk. The schools near us in Essex are excellent.


10 posted on 04/27/2005 10:39:35 AM PDT by pau1f0rd (I'm looking over the wall - and they're looking at me)
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To: Pyro7480
When I was in school we got the paddle if we disrupted class or detention. Does that happen anymore in America?
11 posted on 04/27/2005 10:42:23 AM PDT by expatguy (http://laotze.blogspot.com/)
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To: expatguy

Paddling in school? Heavens no! They've got their rights, you know.


12 posted on 04/27/2005 10:52:01 AM PDT by bigbob (2)
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To: Pyro7480

Swearing? Internet Porn?
SCHOOL?!
This reminds me of my OFFICE!


13 posted on 04/27/2005 10:56:17 AM PDT by SJSAMPLE
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To: Pyro7480

Yes indeed. I recall some five years ago or so Boston imported a few Filipino teachers in the middle of a teacher shortage. These were selected, highly competent teachers, the competition to get a US job (H-1 visa) was intense.

The Filipino teachers were shocked at the behavior of their students. They had never seen anything like that.


14 posted on 04/27/2005 10:58:23 AM PDT by buwaya
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To: Pyro7480
They will have similar results if they did the same thing in the U.S., unfortunately.

The state and federal teachers unions would prevent it. If such a film were made, the unions would block it in court. The grounds? Teacher/student "privacy". The "privacy" argument is more powerful than the 1st Amendment when it suits the interests of the Left.

15 posted on 04/27/2005 11:00:27 AM PDT by elbucko
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To: pau1f0rd

But thats not a representative place either. In the US you can generally move a few miles and find an excellent school district. But that is a function of the local population. The schools are good because of who goes to them; bad schools are bad mainly because their input is bad.


16 posted on 04/27/2005 11:01:43 AM PDT by buwaya
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To: bigbob

Im not joking. We did get the paddle. I graduated High School in 1981.


17 posted on 04/27/2005 11:06:13 AM PDT by expatguy (http://laotze.blogspot.com/)
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To: teletech
Gay porn at that, they wouldn't want students to know the real reason our anatomy is the way it is. *runs to the bathroom to vomit repeatedly*
18 posted on 04/27/2005 11:07:51 AM PDT by kx9088
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To: Pyro7480
During an English lesson with year 9 pupils, which begins with several boys punching each other and swearing, a pupil responds to her attempts to discipline him by saying: "I'll come to your house and blow you up."

Happened to me in first grade. A bunch of third graders who enjoyed picking on me (I was always the shortest, weakest member of any group) told me that they had planted a "talking Drew bomb" in my house which would blow up once I got home. One of them said "I asked the Drew bomb 'will you kill Drew's family for me' and he said 'yes, I hate Drew. I will kill him and his mom and dad and brothers'." It took a lot of coaxing to get me on and off the school bus at the end of the day...

19 posted on 04/27/2005 11:18:52 AM PDT by RightWingAtheist (Creationism is not conservative!)
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To: Pyro7480

Theodore Dalrymple, a psychiatrist who writes for City Journal and National Review, has described the "culture" of the children discussed here and tied it to the Nanny State in England. He sees it as a warning of the direction in which the USA is going--a direction in which "tolerance" is everything and "responsibiity" is unheard of.


20 posted on 04/27/2005 11:27:01 AM PDT by madprof98
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To: Pyro7480

We have teacher who are searching for porn while at school and have inappropriate relationships with students. What a mess! I am glad my kids are grown up and out of the schools.


21 posted on 04/27/2005 11:33:00 AM PDT by Vicki (Re-Vote or Revolt in Washington State. Send the Feds)
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To: Pyro7480

Students need to unionize,
and then make a deal with
government on how the budget should be used.


22 posted on 04/27/2005 11:33:25 AM PDT by greasepaint
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To: Pyro7480
She secretly filmed her experiences using a camera hidden in her briefcase and a microphone disguised as a jacket button.

What an invaluable public service. She should be knighted.

Expose the lies.

23 posted on 04/27/2005 11:34:53 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: EagleUSA

I agree, but the biggest problem is who is raising our children.


24 posted on 04/27/2005 11:36:53 AM PDT by sageb1
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To: MichaelP
That kind of behaviour isn't tolerated at my school, a public middle school in Michigan.

Don't be too sure. I went to school in an upper middle class town in MA in the '70s, widely hailed as "a great school system." The inmates were running the asylum. The administration's PR spin was far different from the reality. Everyone involved in public schooling, from the teachers to the parents to the students, has an incentive to lie.

25 posted on 04/27/2005 11:39:15 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: EveningStar
During an English lesson with year 9 pupils, which begins with several boys punching each other and swearing

[...]

In another lesson, after several attempts to make pupils be quiet, a boy's voice can be heard calling out: "Suck me off, Miss."

26 posted on 04/27/2005 11:41:35 AM PDT by Alouette (In each and every generation they rise up to destroy us, but the Holy One, saves us from their hands)
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To: sageb1

I agree, but the biggest problem is who is raising our children.
=====
Totally true. Parents are a big problem in controlling education and ensuring the proper education of THEIR children. They are too complacent, and assume way too much. I fought the big fight, when my youngsters were in school -- actually won some big changes in school faculty and practices. But it took EFFORT AND INVOLVEMENT. Something nowadays too many partents are not willing to invest, and at the risk of their own kids true education.


27 posted on 04/27/2005 11:42:06 AM PDT by EagleUSA (q)
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To: Aquinasfan
I work here, so I know. There is some misbehaviour. But nowhere near the level of the story....

Mike

28 posted on 04/27/2005 11:43:20 AM PDT by MichaelP
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To: buwaya
"The schools are good because of who goes to them; bad schools are bad mainly because their input is bad."

Yes and no. Our country has always had some amount of problems stemming from kids who are from troubled families. However, the most drastic change in the behavior of school children and the effect on schools came in the late 1980's when middle-class mothers began to leave home en masse to seek employment. Wealthier kids were now home alone. Dual-income parents began to spend more money on their children to make up for not being there with them. These kids turned into monsters and grew up with feelings of entitlement. The stability of the middle class base was gone. Schools in the best of neighborhoods suffered. Sexual harrassment guidelines were studied and put in place in schools. Then it was drugs and guns and breatholyzers at the Prom. It will get worse before it gets better.

29 posted on 04/27/2005 11:49:39 AM PDT by sageb1
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To: EagleUSA

Some of us may be for that kind of involvement, I would rather put that kind of involvement into homeschooling.

I do not have any tolerance for the typical socalist bureaucrat. Too much stress for me.


30 posted on 04/27/2005 11:51:27 AM PDT by TruthConquers (Delenda est publius schola)
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To: Pyro7480

I teach in Mississippi, and my students are respectful and quite well-behaved.

But, alas, Britain is having its 1985.


31 posted on 04/27/2005 12:10:49 PM PDT by struggle ((The struggle continues))
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To: Pyro7480
A reporter for our local paper recently visited some of the problem schools in the city. She reported that students were setting toilet paper rolls on fire and throwing them around in the halls, and pulling fire alarms to get out of class. As a result, the teacher that invited her was reprimanded.

The following week, she reported that a hand-built trophy case for another school was trashed less than a day after being completed. The district threatened to fire the carpenters who built the case.

In all fairness, the paper sent about 30 reporters to the district's 16 high schools on Monday, and did not find these conditions at every school. However, the city has a firm commitment to the bureaucracy and unions that dominate city politics.

32 posted on 04/27/2005 12:26:04 PM PDT by Fudd (Never confuse a liberal with facts.)
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To: expatguy

My dad had a paddle hanging on his junior high classroom wall until about 1983 or so. That was about the time they banned corporal punishment.


33 posted on 04/27/2005 12:56:52 PM PDT by mvpel (Michael Pelletier)
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To: r9etb; netmilsmom
The atmosphere of her school is not nice (which is why we're home-schooling her next year).

Congratulations on your decision to enter the world of full-time home education. I say full-time, because you'll soon learn that once you're in the education mindset, you'll find teaching opportunities in just about everything you do.

I'm going to ping one of my favorite homeschool moms. She has connections to folks with homeschool ping lists, alerting you to articles that I hope you will enjoy.

The FR Homeschoolers are a freindly bunch, and we're all very supportive of parents who are new to homeschooling. Make no mistake: it can be tough when you're starting out. You'll reach a comfort zone after a while. In the meantime, please let me know if you have any questions or concerns about curriculum, approaches, and so forth.

Netmilsmom: PING.

34 posted on 04/27/2005 1:10:40 PM PDT by TontoKowalski
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To: TontoKowalski
The FR Homeschoolers are a freindly bunch

Not always -- I've had a few of them get rather nasty with me, generally stemming from the fact that I'm not, in principle, opposed to public education, (having gotten a pretty good public education myself).

I find that public education often gets the blame for outside problems, such as the prevailing culture, kids with horrible attitudes and even worse home lives, and so on.

35 posted on 04/27/2005 1:28:13 PM PDT by r9etb
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To: kx9088
Gay porn at that, they wouldn't want students to know the real reason our anatomy is the way it is. *runs to the bathroom to vomit repeatedly*

It's tolerance and diversity don'tcha know. Two "buzz" words that will destroy our society.

36 posted on 04/27/2005 2:12:37 PM PDT by teletech (Friends don't let friends vote DemocRAT)
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To: Pyro7480

prolefeed, unspeak


37 posted on 04/27/2005 4:51:06 PM PDT by MD_Willington_1976
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To: r9etb
Of course, I don't speak for all homeschoolers, but I hope for a good education for all children. I believe that parents are responsible for the education their children receive, regardless of the delivery method.

My college roommate is a public school teacher. He tells me that parental involvement is the most reliable indicator for academic success. There is a greater correlation than gender, race, or economic status. If parents are involved, children succeed.

So why did we choose to homeschool rather than be involved public school parents? Our public school system is so bad (in so many ways) that it was just easier to do it outselves, we are in a financial position to live on one income, and my wife had a great interest in doing it.

We've been happy, and haven't regretted our choice. I hope that you'll look back on your choice and feel the same way.

38 posted on 04/27/2005 7:41:03 PM PDT by TontoKowalski
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To: TontoKowalski

I'm on it, FRiend!


39 posted on 04/28/2005 4:42:23 AM PDT by netmilsmom (Pope B16-Smacking down Heresy since 1981! God Bless him!)
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To: r9etb

I am not a militant homeschooler, I am a militant "do right for your child". I am militant that a child needs a parent, not an institution. If your child needs to get some school in to see what it's like, that's fine with me. Some children that I have seen in my homeschool connections NEED to go to school for a while, just because the world rises and sets on their butts.

I believe that a child is better off to do Kindergarten and maybe first grade before homeschooling. My younger daughter will be attending half day Kindergarten in the fall, then come home and do her regular work. I expect she will not go to First grade. In fact I'll be surprised if she makes it to Christmas.

I'm here if you need a boost, even if your daughter goes back to school.
Some children won't learn from a parent. But the learning is much more fun at home!


40 posted on 04/28/2005 4:57:19 AM PDT by netmilsmom (Pope B16-Smacking down Heresy since 1981! God Bless him!)
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