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The Basics: Fill your tank with vegetable oil
MSN online | April 30, 2005 | Jim Washburn

Posted on 04/30/2005 6:10:42 AM PDT by grania

Diesel engines can run on just about anything, including used cooking oil. An entire industry is emerging to provide brave 'biodiesel' pioneers with the ingredients for petroleum-free motoring.

One day last March, my musician friend Jonathan drove up in a Mercedes. This was odd, since Jonathan is so resolutely counterculture that he once tried recording an album in the woods, without electricity.

His car's exhaust smelled faintly of french fries, and therein lay the explanation: The new Jonathan Richman tour vehicle -- an '84 300D Turbo -- was running on vegetable oil-derived biodiesel fuel as he and his drummer crisscrossed the nation in it, a deep fryer on wheels.

I was intrigued: Biodiesel comes from renewable resources. It's made from soybeans, corn or other oil crops, saving America's farmers. Or it comes from recycled kitchen grease, saving America's sewers. It pollutes remarkably less than petroleum fuel, and could potentially make the U.S. energy self-sufficient, freed from bargaining with dictators and terror-sponsor states.

And did I mention it smells like french fries?

But I was also suspicious. If it works so well, why isn't everyone already using it? I've fallen prey to New Age wishful thinking before, and that pyramid never did sharpen my razor. Even after cruising the Pacific Coast Highway in Jonathan's car, something about it didn't seem real. If a car runs on vegetable oil, does that mean I can run my TV on sauerkraut? Don't let retirement sneak up on you. Create a perfect plan.

Endorsed by Rudolf Diesel himself It turns out biodiesel is not a new idea. When Rudolf Diesel introduced his signature engine at the 1900 Paris Exposition, he said two words as he started it: "Peanut oil." He'd designed his engine so farmers could grow their own fuel. Most diesel engines were indeed run on vegetable oil until the 1920s, when the petroleum industry promoted a gasoline byproduct as diesel fuel.

Environmental concerns, the Iraq war and rising gas prices have spurred a renewed interest in biodiesel, and people have discovered that a diesel automobile can run on it with little or no alteration. (Cars more than a decade old should have fuel lines checked, because the highly solvent fuel eats some rubber compounds. It cleans engines so effectively that fuel filters also bear watching.) It can be used interchangeably with standard diesel fuel, and it's had well over a million miles of road-testing.

I started seriously thinking about joining the biodiesel generation when a butterscotch Mercedes 240D turned up for sale around the corner for $3,500. Saving the environment is nice, but I really like butterscotch. Test-driving the car, however, I found that friends' concerns about the model's 67-horsepower engine proved true. The 240D has a reputation for running forever, but that's also apparently how long it takes to get anywhere in it.

The biggest hurdle: where to tank up Even if this wasn't the diesel steed for our experiment in vehicular unction, I was now set on getting one. My wife expressed doubts about the biodiesel lifestyle, though, when I suggested we could store the 55-gallon drum in the bushes near the garage.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: algae; altenativefuel; biodiesel; energy; environment; eonomics; innovation
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What a great use for all of the grease that's making us fat!
1 posted on 04/30/2005 6:10:43 AM PDT by grania
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To: grania

Problem will be getting rid of the craving for a ceasers salad every time you drive.


2 posted on 04/30/2005 6:12:04 AM PDT by Semper Paratus (-)
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To: grania

Now when they get it to run on Ben and Jerry's they will have really hit on something!!!!


3 posted on 04/30/2005 6:13:16 AM PDT by stm
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To: grania

Yeah... like we have reserves of vegetable oil-bio-diesel to exploit...as large as Saudi Arabia's oil reserves


4 posted on 04/30/2005 6:14:10 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: grania

We keep hearing a lot about soy bio-diesel around here.


5 posted on 04/30/2005 6:16:11 AM PDT by Conservativegreatgrandma
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To: grania



Doesn't it take more of regular oil to harvest corn oil. I feel like if this was such a great idea it would have been done already.


6 posted on 04/30/2005 6:18:37 AM PDT by LauraleeBraswell ( We must stand behind TOM DELAY!)
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To: dennisw
Actually, scientists are looking at the possibility of growing certain types of algae with high carbohydrate content which could be processed into biodiesel fuel. If they succeed, the oil crisis is permanently over, since algae is a renewable resource.

The nice thing about biodiesel is that not only is it very clean-burning in a diesel engine when refined properly (you don't even have the French fry smell of used cooking oil), but by just changing the refining process slightly you also get heating oil of the type that can be used in furnaces that use heating oil.

7 posted on 04/30/2005 6:20:01 AM PDT by RayChuang88
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To: stm
Now when they get it to run on Ben and Jerry's they will have really hit on something!!!!

mmmmm.....living near a highway will be like a walk through the food court.

8 posted on 04/30/2005 6:22:24 AM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: grania
Two 1984 M-B 190D's ... purchased new ... all of 72 horsepower ... 5-speed manual transmssions ... 460,000 miles plus on each ... 46-48 miles per gallon year in and year out ... tailwind not included.
9 posted on 04/30/2005 6:22:37 AM PDT by jamaksin
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To: RayChuang88
Actually, scientists are looking at the possibility of growing certain types of algae with high carbohydrate content which could be processed into biodiesel fuel. If they succeed, the oil crisis is permanently over, since algae is a renewable resource.

The cynic in me says that corporations and governments are going to exploit traditional fuel for profit as much as it can before there is a "crisis" and we're all using McDonald's french fries (or whatever) for something useful.

10 posted on 04/30/2005 6:24:51 AM PDT by grania ("Won't get fooled again")
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To: grania
Right now grease from fries, and deep fat cooking is generally free, but when more people start clamoring for bio-diesel, that fat won't be free anymore.

BTW - you ever buy cooking oil? It is more expensive than diesel.

At a personal level, for those that want to grow and produce bio-diesel, it might be viable, but not large scale.

Lastly, diesel can run straight vegetable oil, with some minor mods first.

11 posted on 04/30/2005 6:24:56 AM PDT by Bear_Slayer
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To: grania

Generally, I fill the car with very old vegetable oil.


12 posted on 04/30/2005 6:25:00 AM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: RayChuang88
Actually, scientists are looking at the possibility of growing certain types of algae with high carbohydrate content which could be processed into biodiesel fuel. If they succeed, the oil crisis is permanently over, since algae is a renewable resource.

The energy inputs are probably as ridiculous as growing corn to make ethanol. It takes a lot of oil to grow a bushel of corn. Oil is also used to make fertilizer

You would have build millions of acres of cement algae ponds. That costs billions. You would be using oil to fuel all the machinery to harvest and grow the stuff.

Petroleum is so convenient because nature has done most of the work making it

13 posted on 04/30/2005 6:25:59 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: dennisw

I could about 2 acres into oilseed production. With a small tractor with a PTO to run the press... could work.


14 posted on 04/30/2005 6:26:33 AM PDT by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending.)
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To: stm

sure at $3.99 per pint. every pint i used in that car would be a major hurdle....i would have to decide....hmmmm....do i taste this or drive on it?


15 posted on 04/30/2005 6:28:15 AM PDT by applpie
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To: Bear_Slayer
Right now grease from fries, and deep fat cooking is generally free, but when more people start clamoring for bio-diesel, that fat won't be free anymore.

But of course. I think old cooking oil is a nuisance to dispose of and restaurants let renderers take it for free. Hey, you could pull into your local grease/fat renderer and tank up on it

16 posted on 04/30/2005 6:28:42 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: farmfriend

ping


17 posted on 04/30/2005 6:28:47 AM PDT by freepatriot32 (If you want to change government support the libertarian party www.lp.org)
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To: eno_
I could about 2 acres into oilseed production. With a small tractor with a PTO to run the press... could work

I'm first in line. :-)

I agree, it will work, but how much can you make? Enough for yourself. You won't be solving the energy crisis, though.

Not that you shouldn't make it. I suppose if enough people were more self-sufficient, it might take the pinch off the petroleum industry.

18 posted on 04/30/2005 6:28:52 AM PDT by Bear_Slayer
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To: grania

Wow! This is great! I suppose soon I'll be paying $20 a litre for extra virgin spanish olive oil, and the whole continent smelling like french fries. Soon our automobiles will be endangering not only our lungs and our environment, but consuming our actual food supplies. Shades of 'I Robot'.


19 posted on 04/30/2005 6:31:01 AM PDT by Calusa (its a mere fig leaf of fairness.)
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To: eno_
I could about 2 acres into oilseed production. With a small tractor with a PTO to run the press... could work.

You would be consuming petroleum to grow it. You are growing the middleman. Far better to consume petroleum directly than to grow crops with it and make it into fuel for cars, such as ethanol and bio-diesel

Fertilizer is made with oil

20 posted on 04/30/2005 6:31:53 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: dennisw
But of course. I think old cooking oil is a nuisance to dispose

BIG BUSINESS:

"Shall I give a way all this seemingly useless cooking oil or sell it to the petroleum industry that is now geared up for biodiesel?"

It's an easy answer; they'll sell it - and do the highest bidder.

21 posted on 04/30/2005 6:32:01 AM PDT by Bear_Slayer
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To: Bear_Slayer

I have no illusions of solving the crisis. But don't underestimate the value of insulating yourself from the bone-headed "solutions" the government might try in the form of new taxes.

For example, because I have my own well and septic, the MWRA can kiss my ass.


22 posted on 04/30/2005 6:32:42 AM PDT by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending.)
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To: dennisw
You would be consuming petroleum to grow it.

And no petroleum is used in the exportation of petroleum?

23 posted on 04/30/2005 6:33:15 AM PDT by Bear_Slayer
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To: dennisw

Drought causes worries in Brazil's sugar/ethanol industry - News ...
... Araçatuba, 08 - Drought that has already lasted a month in São Paulo and
Paraná, Brazil's main sugarcane states, is causing concern in the sugar/ethanol ...
www.aebrazil.com/highlights/2005/mar/08/55.htm - 12k - Cached - Similar pages

São Paulo state, Guandong province discuss ethanol - News - AE-Brazil
... whereby Brazil will export sugar, ethanol, biofuel vehicles and even biodiesel.
... the Sugar and Ethanol Sector president at the Brazilian Agriculture ...
www.aebrazil.com/highlights/2004/mai/28/43.htm - 13k - Cached - Similar pages

[PDF] The Brazilian Sugar Industry: Recent Developments
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
... Brazilian sugar and ethanol are taking on considerable. importance as negotiations
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Co-Productts Asbtracts - Paper
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24 posted on 04/30/2005 6:34:02 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: RayChuang88

I like the way you think. We should bail on oil as soon as we can. Way too many headaches.


25 posted on 04/30/2005 6:35:46 AM PDT by Huck (One day the lion will lay down with the lamb; Until that day comes, I want America to be the lion.)
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To: dennisw

I was thinking diesel tractor, which was Rudolf Diesel's first application of his technology. One would only run a tractor a few tens of hours to farm 2 acres and press the seeds. The numbers work.


26 posted on 04/30/2005 6:36:13 AM PDT by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending.)
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To: eno_
But don't underestimate the value of insulating yourself from the bone-headed "solutions" the government might try in the form of new taxes.

I never underestimate the value of insulating myself from government.

For example, because I have my own well and septic, the MWRA can kiss my ass.

I don't know who the MWRA is, but if they seek to regulate my well, tell them to kiss mine as well.

27 posted on 04/30/2005 6:37:25 AM PDT by Bear_Slayer
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To: dennisw
You would have build millions of acres of cement algae ponds.

Actually not. I've read reports that by using saltwater ponds in desert regions, we can grow enough high-carbohydrate to fuel every vehicle in the USA! You might want to read this web page:

http://www.unh.edu/p2/biodiesel/article_alge.html

It talks about how just 15,000 square miles of land could be used to create all that biodiesel fuel for American needs. That could mean the deserts of Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt could be turned into gigantic algae ponds to produce enough biomass to refine into biodiesel fuel for every vehicle in Europe!

28 posted on 04/30/2005 6:38:26 AM PDT by RayChuang88
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To: eno_

Most seed oils used for cooking are extracted at high temperatures with solvents. You will leave oil behind if you press it cold with your PTO. Multiply your two acres into one thousand it still doesn't work out. Burn that OPEC oil directly instead of growing crops with it that are made into automobile fuels.


29 posted on 04/30/2005 6:40:33 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: grania

I saw Daryl Hannah years ago on O'Reilly talking about something like this. She said she filled up her car from a special place, and it smelled like french fries.

She said it cost slightly over $2 a gallon (this when gas was maybe $1.25). She said it was healthy for the environment, and ran in any diesel car. It seemed interesting to pursue.


30 posted on 04/30/2005 6:41:46 AM PDT by I still care (America is not the problem - it is the solution..)
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To: dennisw

Fertilizer, btw, is made by my neighbors' horses and chickens. I don't know how much home grown eggs cost to produce, but they taste 10 times better than store bought. Similarly, my biodiesel would let me give a hearty FU! to the gas tax man. That's worth doing.


31 posted on 04/30/2005 6:41:56 AM PDT by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending.)
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To: RayChuang88

I'll read it. Just building and maintaining saltwater algae ponds in such deserts is a hugely expensive proposition


32 posted on 04/30/2005 6:43:26 AM PDT by dennisw (2 plain)
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To: LauraleeBraswell

I think that in the past it has been less than cost effective. As the price of fuel rises that changes.


33 posted on 04/30/2005 6:44:55 AM PDT by tiki
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To: grania
One of the biggest secrets about vegetable oil is that it can be used to clean oil based paint from a paint brush in the event that the painter doesn't have mineral spirits.
34 posted on 04/30/2005 6:45:41 AM PDT by AlGone2001 (You will never know that Jesus is all you need, until Jesus is all you've got-Mother Teresa)
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To: dennisw
Just building and maintaining saltwater algae ponds in such deserts is a hugely expensive proposition.

However, you could refine a small fraction of that algae-based biomass into biodiesel and use to power generators to operate the ponds.

35 posted on 04/30/2005 6:49:31 AM PDT by RayChuang88
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To: grania

So now our highways and other vehicles will soon acquire a thin veneer of vegetable grease, kind of like our kitchen appliances after a few days of frying things on the stove?


36 posted on 04/30/2005 6:51:13 AM PDT by rabidralph (My truck appreciates the rest of you driving fuel-efficient vehicles.)
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To: grania
It pollutes remarkably less than petroleum fuel

Truth or hype?

37 posted on 04/30/2005 6:51:52 AM PDT by RightWhale (50 trillion sovereign cells working together in relative harmony)
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To: grania

McDonalds has only started making money. Fill me and it up.


38 posted on 04/30/2005 6:53:50 AM PDT by billhilly (If you're lurking here from DU (Democrats unglued), I trust this post will make you sick)
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To: grania
A friend of mine runs this stuff in his Dodge Cummins diesel; after *filtering* through coffee filters first of course!
39 posted on 04/30/2005 6:56:13 AM PDT by _Jim (<--- Ann C. and Rush L. speak on gutless Liberals (RealAudio files))
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To: grania

This sounds like a workable solution to me.


40 posted on 04/30/2005 6:56:14 AM PDT by tkathy (Tyranny breeds terrorism. Freedom breeds peace.)
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To: jamaksin

My dad owned a 170 D in Japan in the late 1950s. Sad to leave it behind when we came returned stateside.


41 posted on 04/30/2005 7:09:47 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: LauraleeBraswell
In my college days, some 25 years ago, we always heard more calories go in to agriculture, than what comes out.

However, those calories are very important...

42 posted on 04/30/2005 7:10:47 AM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: dennisw
Multiply your two acres into one thousand it still doesn't work out.

Sure it works. It worked when Rudy Diesel sold it to German farmers. It never stopped working. The tractor, btw, runs on diesel. Algae, however, seems to be the real answer: http://www.unh.edu/p2/biodiesel/article_alge.html

With algae, we could replace the entire transportation fuel supply with less than 10M acres. Back of the envelope, the total capex would be under $30B, less than twice what it cost to build a few miles of highway tunnels under Boston, and a small fraction of the cost of OIF.

43 posted on 04/30/2005 7:12:04 AM PDT by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending.)
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To: RightWhale

Not much sulphur in the veg oil. Lack of other minerals that are nasty in the air, too. That is the pollution advantage. And you get a closed loop on CO2, if you think it matters.


44 posted on 04/30/2005 7:14:26 AM PDT by eno_ (Freedom Lite - it's almost worth defending.)
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To: grania

What happens when Americans wake up and drastically cut their consumption of fried foods?


45 posted on 04/30/2005 7:14:31 AM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink.)
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To: Lil'freeper

Use vegetable oils as fuel; eat only natural animal fats! Solve the Middle East problem and the national health crisis all in one fell swoop. Not a bad idea.


46 posted on 04/30/2005 7:16:00 AM PDT by Rytwyng (we're here, we're Huguenots, get used to us...)
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To: dennisw

"Just building and maintaining saltwater algae ponds in such deserts is a hugely expensive proposition"

$74.7 Billion maybe?


47 posted on 04/30/2005 7:16:57 AM PDT by Samurai_Jack (ride out and confront the evil!)
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To: LauraleeBraswell
"I feel like if this was such a great idea it would have been done already. "


It's well that that kind of thinking isn't rampant among inventors to come and those of the past.

48 posted on 04/30/2005 7:17:11 AM PDT by G.Mason ( Because Free Republic obviously needed another opinionated big mouth ... Proud NRA member)
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To: grania
The cynic in me says that corporations and governments are going to exploit traditional fuel for profit as much as it can before there is a "crisis" and we're all using McDonald's french fries (or whatever) for something useful.

Following this logic, Wouldn't IBM and the government have conspired to keep the computing business in the hands of big business and the government and silently sent out hit squads to rub out upstarts like Bill Gates?

49 posted on 04/30/2005 7:21:14 AM PDT by LoneRangerMassachusetts (Some say what's good for others, the others make the goods; it's the meddlers against the peddlers)
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To: G.Mason
One of the problems with soy oil derived diesel fuel is the pour point. Below 40 degrees F., this stuff starts to get very tacky and will turn to a solid below 30. The new soy fuel plants coming on line in MN and Missouri are storing the oil in heated tanks and will probably make deliveries in insulated trailers.
50 posted on 04/30/2005 7:23:09 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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