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Editor of Jesuit Magazine Leaving
AP from Yahoo ^ | 5/6/05 | Nicole Winfield

Posted on 05/06/2005 3:09:10 PM PDT by ndkos

VATICAN CITY - The editor of the Jesuit weekly America is leaving the magazine after the Vatican received complaints about articles he published on touchy issues such as same-sex marriages and stem cell research, Jesuit officials said Friday. ADVERTISEMENT

The Rev. Thomas J. Reese, a widely respected expert on the Catholic Church and the Vatican who was editor for seven years, is being replaced by his deputy, the Rev. Drew Christiansen, the magazine said in a statement.

Jesuit officials in Rome and the United States, who spoke on condition they not be identified, said some American bishops had contacted the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith about articles in the magazine over the years that had presented both sides of controversies over sensitive church issues.

The Vatican has had a sometimes tense relationship with the Jesuits, some of whose members in the past have questioned papal pronouncements on birth control, priestly celibacy and the ban on women priests.

The magazine had made a point of publishing broad points of view — including some that clashed with church teaching — irking some Catholics in the United States and Rome, the officials said.

Some of the hot-button issues included gay priests, stem-cell research, whether Catholic politicians can be denied communion if they support abortion rights, and same-sex unions.

The magazine also wrote about a Vatican document that outlined the idea that divine truth is most fully revealed in Christianity and the Catholic Church in particular.

The document "Dominus Iesus" was issued in 2000 by the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith — the office that was headed by German Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger before he became Pope Benedict XVI last month.

Critics complained the document could set back Church efforts to reach out to other Christians and believers outside the Church.

Reese is based in New York where the magazine is edited. He was in Rome for the election of Benedict, who had enforced a hard line on church doctrine and silenced theologians who diverged from it in his 24 years as Pope John Paul II's orthodoxy watchdog.

While in Rome, Reese met with his superior who mentioned there had been complaints about a couple of articles, a Jesuit official in Rome said. The official said Reese had left Rome with the idea he would resign.

Any response to complaints from U.S. bishops or Vatican officials would be made by the Jesuit General in Rome, the Rev. Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, and the 11 Jesuit leaders in the United States.

In the statement from newly named editor Christiansen, he noted that under Reese, the magazine often gave two sides of the debate on sensitive church issues — and that made it more relevant.

"By inviting articles that covered different sides of disputed issues, Father Reese helped make America a forum for intelligent discussion of questions facing the church and the country today," Christiansen said.

When contacted Friday, Reese said only that his tenure ends on June 1 and that he would move immediately to California and continue in his Jesuit ministry. He referred other comment to his news release.

In that release, Reese praised Christiansen, whom he had recruited in 2002.

He said he was "proud of what my colleagues and I did with the magazine, and I am grateful to them, our readers and our benefactors for the support they gave me. I look forward to taking a sabbatical while my provincial (regional boss) and I determine the next phase of my Jesuit ministry."

An official at the Jesuit headquarters in Washington, the Rev. Albert Diulio, said Reese and his provincial supervisor had reached the decision together, and noted that Jesuits tend to rotate jobs every six or seven years.

Diulio said he could not comment on any other reasons behind the change.

An official with the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith declined to comment on the matter. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops said she had no information.

The Jesuit order founded by St. Ignatius Loyola in 1540 is renowned for its intellectual rigor and its excellent teachers, scholars and scientists. The Vatican has at times taken aim at its independence.

In the most recent publicized incident, John Paul named a temporary replacement to lead the order after the Rev. Pedro Arrupe suffered a crippling stroke in 1981, brushing aside Arrupe's choice for an interim leader in an unprecedented change-of-command.

Arrupe, who died in 1991, had pushed for the church to move for a more socially just world while remaining faithful to papal authority. But during his tenure, some Jesuits especially in the United States and the Netherlands challenged Vatican pronouncements on birth control, priestly celibacy and the ban on women priests.

___

Associated Press writer Frances D'Emilio contributed to this article.


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: catholic; jesuit; reese
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Go Pope Benedict XVI! I don't think it's a coincidence that this is happening now that Pope Benedict has the authority to discipline these people. I hope the rest of the liberal "Catholics" will follow this guy's lead and resign also.

I hope this new guy will be better but I am not so sure.

1 posted on 05/06/2005 3:09:10 PM PDT by ndkos
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To: NYer

Catholic ping!


2 posted on 05/06/2005 3:09:32 PM PDT by ndkos
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To: ndkos

"The cafeteria is closed."


3 posted on 05/06/2005 3:10:52 PM PDT by The Iguana
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To: ndkos

"Giving both sides of the debate" in this context can also be defined as "giving both the teaching of the Catholic Church and heresies against that teaching."


4 posted on 05/06/2005 3:11:46 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: ndkos

Thank God. It's about time. But why stop there? Kick that liberal fruitcake out of the priesthood. Get rid of the pansies impersonating priests.

5 posted on 05/06/2005 3:13:10 PM PDT by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: Petronski

I don't think that's what happened. I doubt that the American bishops that were complaining to the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith were Mahoney and Pilla. Why would the complaints be about anything else than liberal heresies?


6 posted on 05/06/2005 3:15:01 PM PDT by ndkos
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To: ndkos
a widely respected expert on the Catholic Church and the Vatican

What's the betting line that he'll be on the AP payroll within a week?

7 posted on 05/06/2005 3:17:52 PM PDT by SmithL (Proud Submariner)
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To: ndkos

I don't understand your response.


8 posted on 05/06/2005 3:18:02 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: Petronski
The article says some American bishops complained to the CDF.

Why would liberal bishops complain to the CDF about conservative teachings? They wouldn't.

Therefore it must have been conservative bishops complaining about liberalism in the magazine.

Besides, I have heard bad things about Reese and America.
9 posted on 05/06/2005 3:21:32 PM PDT by ndkos
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To: ndkos
Why would liberal bishops complain to the CDF about conservative teachings? They wouldn't.

Precisely my point.

10 posted on 05/06/2005 3:29:58 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: ndkos
This is my point:

"By inviting articles that covered different sides of disputed issues, Father Reese helped make America a forum for intelligent discussion of questions facing the church and the country today," Christiansen said.

This magazine sounds like another AmChurch propaganda rag, like the National Catholic Reporter.

11 posted on 05/06/2005 3:31:36 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: ndkos
The Vatican has had a sometimes tense relationship with the Jesuits, some of whose members in the past have questioned papal pronouncements on birth control, priestly celibacy and the ban on women priests.

I thought the Jesuits were the most fiercely loyal subjects (for lack of a better word) of the Pope. I also thought they had a great deal of autonomy. Now, both assumptions are in doubt.

12 posted on 05/06/2005 3:35:50 PM PDT by Tamar1973 (America is not free anymore, the judicial oligarchy rules. Want proof? Ask Terri Schindler!!!!!)
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To: Tamar1973
I thought the Jesuits were the most fiercely loyal subjects (for lack of a better word) of the Pope.

Maybe in the Middle Ages. LOL

Georgetown is a Jesuit university. 'Nough said.

13 posted on 05/06/2005 3:39:22 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: Tamar1973
I thought the Jesuits were the most fiercely loyal subjects (for lack of a better word) of the Pope.

This would be true if all Jesuits were saints like their founder, Saint Ignatius of Loyola.

14 posted on 05/06/2005 4:08:37 PM PDT by Arthur McGowan
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To: Tamar1973
The Jesuits did a 180. They are now essentially an arm of the secular left. The Catholic Church will become a more attractive destination for searching youth as it shows that, like Benedict, it says what it means and means what it says.
15 posted on 05/06/2005 4:10:31 PM PDT by Malesherbes
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To: Petronski
I thought the Jesuits were the most fiercely loyal subjects (for lack of a better word) of the Pope.

Maybe in the Middle Ages. LOL

Ignatius Loyola wasn't even born until 1491, so most would date the Jesuits to the Renaissance.

As for when the Jesuits became so open-minded that their brains fell out, that probably dates to about Vatican II.

16 posted on 05/06/2005 4:15:17 PM PDT by Sooth2222
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To: Sooth2222

Thank you for the correction. My study of history is pretty shallow prior to 1800, I must admit.


17 posted on 05/06/2005 4:17:23 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: ndkos

"Reese is based in New York where the magazine is edited. He was in Rome for the election of Benedict, who had enforced a hard line on church doctrine and silenced theologians who diverged from it in his 24 years as Pope John Paul II's orthodoxy watchdog."



Has this ever really happened in modern times, or is it merely that church representatives could declare that certain theologians could no longer represent themselves as Catholic theologians, i.e., could no longer claim to be speaking for the Catholic congregation? For example, Hans Kung (who, the last I heard, was not the least bit silent).


18 posted on 05/06/2005 4:57:35 PM PDT by Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
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To: ndkos; american colleen; Lady In Blue; Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; ...
The Vatican has had a sometimes tense relationship with the Jesuits, some of whose members in the past have questioned papal pronouncements on birth control, priestly celibacy and the ban on women priests.

We have all watched with dismay as the Jesuit Order has slithered into the more liberal realms of church teaching. However, one star that shines brightly in the order is ....


Fr. Mitch Pacwa

Jesuit priest and popular television host of several EWTN (www.ewtn.com) television and radio programs, including EWTN Live,The Holy Rosary in the Holy Land , and currently Threshold of Hope, Fr Mitch has a dynamic and engaging presence. An accomplished biblical scholar and apologist, Fr Mitch holds a B.A. in Philosophy and Theology from University of Detroit (summa cum laude), a Master of Divinity and S.T.B. from the Jesuit School of Theology at Loyola University (magna cum laude), and Phd in Old Testament from Vanderbilt University. He speaks 12 languages, some of which include; Arabic, Aramaic, Hebrew, and Koine Greek, and  has taught courses in Old Testament, New Testament in high schools, seminaries, and universities, including Loyola University (Chicago) and University of Dallas. Fr Mitch is also a seasoned world-traveler, particularly to the Holy Land , where he has visited no fewer than 44 times.

 

Fr. Mitch is author of  Catholics and the New Age, Forgive Me Father, for I am Frustrated, and Some Heard Thunder, Some Heard God. He is founder of Ignatius Productions, under the Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus -- a multi-media teaching apostolate that features his books, tapes, and video productions. He is contributing author to several Catholic publications, including; This Rock Magazine.

Bi-ritual in the Maronite rite, Pacwa is a frequent visitor to the homes of Lebanese parishioners in Birmingham.

The Eastern Catholic Maronite Church

It was in Antioch that the followers of Jesus Christ converted by Paul and Barnabas were first called Christians [Acts 11:26]. Antioch, especially after the destruction of Jerusalem in 71 AD, became a center for Christianity. The first Bishop was St. Peter before his travels to Rome. The third Bishop was the Apostolic Father St. Ignatius of Antioch. Antioch became one of the five original Patriarchates after Constantine recognized Christianity.

Maron, a contemporary and friend of St. John Chrysostom, was a monk in the fourth century who left Antioch for the Orontes River to lead an ascetic life, following the traditions of St. Anthony of the Desert and St. Pachomius of Egypt. He soon had many followers that adopted his monastic life. Following the death of St. Maron in 410, his disciples built a monastery in his memory and formed the nucleus of the Maronite Church. 8

The Maronites held fast to the beliefs of the Council of Chalcedon in 451. When 350 monks were slain by the Monophysites of Antioch, the Maronites sought refuge in the mountains of Lebanon. Correspondence concerning the event brought papal recognition of the Maronites by Pope Hormisdas on February 10, 518. 9
The martyrdom of the Patriarch of Antioch in 602 left the Maronites without a leader, and led them to elect their first Maronite Patriarch, St. John Maron, in 685.

Little was heard from the Maronites for 400 years, as they quietly escaped the Muslim invasions in the mountains of Lebanon, until the Crusader Raymond of Toulouse discovered the Maronites in the mountains near Tripoli, Lebanon on his way to conquer Jerusalem. The Maronites again confirmed their loyalty to the Pope in 1181. The Maronites have always remained true to Rome. 5, 8, 9, 10

The Maronites, because of their monastic origin, were able to withstand intense pressure and even persecution to preserve their Church, not just by the Muslims, but also by separated brethren such as the Orthodox and Churches of the East, as well as efforts at Latinization from Rome. Even today, the words at the Consecration of the Mass are said in Aramaic, the language of Jesus.
The Maronites have especially fluorished since the Second Vatican Council, and are now the third largest Eastern Catholic Church, numbering about 3,200,000 faithful throughout the world, including parishes in the United States, Brazil, Argentina, Mexico, and Australia. We are blessed to have Our Lady of Lebanon Maronite Seminary in Washington, D. C., established in 1961.

A Roman Catholic may attend Divine Liturgy at any Eastern Catholic Church and fulfill their Sunday obligation.

The Catholic Church is both Western and Eastern. As most of us realize, the Church began in the East. Our Lord lived and died and resurrected in the Holy Land. The Church spread from Jerusalem throughout the known world. As the Church spread, it encountered different cultures and adapted, retaining from each culture what was consistent with the Gospel. In the city of Alexandria, the Church became very Egyptian; in Antioch it remained very Jewish; in Rome it took on an Italian appearance and in the Constantinople it took on the trappings of the Roman imperial court. All the churches which developed this way were Eastern, except Rome. Most Catholics in the United States have their roots in Western Europe where the Roman rite predominated. It has been said that the Eastern Catholic Churches are "the best kept secret in the Catholic Church."

The Vatican II Council declared that "all should realize it is of supreme importance to understand, venerate, preserve, and foster the exceedingly rich liturgical and spiritual heritage of the Eastern churches, in order faithfully to preserve the fullness of Christian tradition" (Unitatis Redintegrato, 15). Pope John Paul II said that "the Catholic Church is both Eastern and Western."

Check your local community at the following link and look into attending an Eastern Catholic Liturgy (not to be confused with the Orthodox Church).

Eastern Catholic Churches in the U.S.

The Eastern Catholic Rites retain the rich heritage of our church, without the "novelties" introduced into the Novus Ordo liturgy. Incense is used throughout.

I attend a Maronite Catholic Church. The Consecration is in Aramaic, using the words and language of our Lord at the Last Supper. Communion is ONLY distributed by the priest. It is by intinction (the priest dips the consecrated host into the Precious Blood) and is ONLY received on the tongue. The priest administers communion with the words: "Receive the Body and Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, for the remission of sin and eternal salvation".

A Roman Catholic may attend the Divine Liturgy at any Eastern Catholic Church. You can learn more about the 22 different liturgies at this link:

CATHOLIC RITES AND CHURCHES

19 posted on 05/06/2005 5:01:58 PM PDT by NYer ("Love without truth is blind; Truth without love is empty." - Pope Benedict XVI)
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To: NYer

The coolest Holy Mass I saw on EWTN from the Vatican was the Maronite Holy Mass.
Even my Prebyterian hubby was enthralled by the Aramaic!


20 posted on 05/06/2005 5:10:27 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Pope B16-Smacking down Heresy since 1981! God Bless him!)
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To: NYer
Bishop Pacwa, I like the sound of that!!!
21 posted on 05/06/2005 5:52:04 PM PDT by Fred
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To: ndkos; .45MAN; AAABEST; AKA Elena; al_c; american colleen; Angelus Errare; annalex; Annie03; ...
Now they need to force National Catholic Reporter to stop calling itself "Catholic":

Posted Friday, May 6, 2005 at 4:15 p.m. CST

National Catholic Reporter has posted the following breaking news story on its Web site, NCRonline.org.

Editor of Jesuit's America magazine forced to resign under Vatican pressure

By Tom Roberts and John L. Allen, Jr.
Kansas City, Mo. and Rome

Jesuit Fr. Thomas J. Reese, editor for the past seven years of America magazine, a premier publication of Catholic thought and opinion, has resigned at the request of his order following years of pressure for his ouster from the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

The resignation caps five years of tensions and exchanges among the congregation, which was headed at the time by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, the Jesuits and Reese, according to sources close to the magazine who asked not to be identified.

A release from the magazine May 6, which did not mention the forced ouster, announced that the new editor is Jesuit Fr. Drew Christiansen, who has served as associate editor.

Ironically, Reese received the news that the Jesuits found the debate "unwinnable," according to one source, when he returned to the magazine's New York headquarters from Rome, where he had covered the conclave that elected Ratzinger as pope.

Contacted on background, a Vatican official said he could not discuss the case.

Over the course of a five-year exchange between the doctrinal congregation and the Jesuits, the Vatican congregation had raised objections to various editorial choices at America under Reese's leadership, including:

a.. An essay exploring moral arguments for the approval of condoms in the context of HIV/AIDS;

b.. Several critical analyses of the doctrinal congregation's September 2000 document Dominus Iesus, on religious pluralism;
c.. An editorial criticizing what America called a lack of due process in the congregation's procedures for the investigation of theologians;
d.. An essay about homosexual priests;
e.. A guest essay from U.S. Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, challenging suggestions that the church should refuse Communion to Catholic politicians who do not vote as a number of bishops believe they should vote.

In every instance, however, the pieces represented just a portion of coverage of the subject in America, which always published opposing points of view.

According to one source, the communication about Reese's fate was carried on between the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and the superior general of the Jesuits, Dutch Fr. Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, with the content then relayed to Reese's Jesuit superiors in the United States. Although critics of Reese both in the United States and Rome have occasionally accused him of an anti-hierarchical mentality, supporters noted in their responses to the congregation that over his seven years as editor, America routinely published weighty pieces by prominent members of the hierarchy, at one stage including Ratzinger himself.

In February 2002, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith proposed creating a three-member commission of censors for the magazine, though the idea was never implemented. According to sources, the congregation told the Jesuits that the action was in response to concern from bishops in the United States.

Sources said no bishops were identified by name and that Reese was never directly contacted. According to a source close to the magazine, Jesuit superiors said some bishops were upset that Reese often commented on church matters for general media and that such commentary should be solely the province of bishops.

Reese often made himself available to media during the bishops' meetings and other special church events to explain aspects of church life and the intricacies of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. He is the author of three highly respected studies of the Catholic hierarchy: Archbishop, Inside the Power Structure of the American Catholic Church;A Flock of Shepherds: The National Conference of Catholic Bishops; and Inside the Vatican: The Politics and Organization of the Catholic Church.

The entire matter of his disciplining was handled "by chain of command, and the Jesuits were able to hold off for five years, but in the end, saw it as unwinnable. It was either Reese goes or they would appoint a board of censors," said one source.

America, though clearly left-leaning in some of its editorial stances, was widely viewed as a moderate publication that gave vent to a wide spectrum of views. Among its contributors were top theologians, a number of bishops, and, in one instance, Ratzinger himself in an article published in dialogue with Cardinal Walter Kasper, another German cardinal. Over the years, the magazine has also published dozens of articles by noted conservative Cardinal Avery Dulles.

Though pressure for Reese's ouster clearly came from the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, to what degree Ratzinger was personally involved in the decision is not known.

In the May 6 release, Reese said, "I am proud of what my colleagues and I did with the magazine, and I am grateful to them, our readers and our benefactors for the support they gave me. I look forward to taking a sabbatical while my provincial and I determine the next phase of my Jesuit ministry."

Christiansen, an accomplished educator, writer and editor, previously was a senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University. He was director of the Office of International Justice and Peace for the United States Catholic Conference from 1991 to 1998 and served as counselor for international affairs for the bishops until December 2004.

"I know I am speaking for all the editors in saying that we are sorry to see Tom go," said Christiansen in the May 6 release. "Fr. Reese greatly improved the magazine, adding news coverage, color and the Web edition. . By inviting articles that covered different sides of disputed issues, Fr. Reese helped make America a forum for intelligent discussion of questions facing the church and the country today."

22 posted on 05/06/2005 5:54:09 PM PDT by St. Johann Tetzel (Sometimes "Defending the Faith" means you have to be willing to get your hands dirty...)
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To: ndkos
Arrupe's Undoing - Father Drinan SJ - Congressman from Massachusetts
23 posted on 05/06/2005 5:58:20 PM PDT by Fred
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To: visualops

ping


24 posted on 05/06/2005 5:59:22 PM PDT by TheStickman (If a moron becomes senile how can you tell?)
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To: St. Johann Tetzel

But how can this be, given the strong assurances given by certain uncredentialed heterodox AmChurchers that John Allen is so fair!


25 posted on 05/06/2005 6:04:29 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: NYer

Father Pacwa is the exception that proves the rule. :O)


26 posted on 05/06/2005 6:05:34 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: ndkos
When contacted Friday, Reese said only that his tenure ends on June 1 and that he would move immediately to California and continue in his Jesuit ministry.

Hmm . . . lots of evangelizing to be done on the Left Coast, I suppose.

27 posted on 05/06/2005 6:12:01 PM PDT by madprof98
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To: Petronski
There are plenty of good Jesuits. We must never forget the Society of Jesus started the counter reformation in Europe.

Father Walter Ciszek SJ. is one of my favorites. His book "He Leadeth Me" tells the story of his imprisonment.

"This is the deeply moving personal story of one man's spiritual odyssey and the unflagging faith which enabled him to survice the horrendous ordeal that wrenched his body and spirit to near collapse. Captured by the Russian army during world War II and convicted of being a "Vatican spy," American Jesuit Father Walter J. Ciszek spent some 23 agonizing years in Soviet prisons and the labor camps of Siberia. He here recalls how it was only through an utter reliance on God's will that he managed to endure."

28 posted on 05/06/2005 6:16:42 PM PDT by Fred
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To: Petronski
If John Allen was a Jesuit, he'd be hitting the pavement too ;-)

All we can hope for there is that B16 pulls their "Catholic" moniker.

uncredentialed heterodox AmChurchers ??? No idea what you are talking about, unless you are referring to uncredentialed heterodox OldCatholicChurchers

29 posted on 05/06/2005 6:19:44 PM PDT by St. Johann Tetzel (Sometimes "Defending the Faith" means you have to be willing to get your hands dirty...)
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To: Petronski; NYer

Don't forget Father Fessio :-)


30 posted on 05/06/2005 6:26:09 PM PDT by padfoot_lover
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To: padfoot_lover

TWO exceptions that prove the rule. LOL


31 posted on 05/06/2005 6:28:52 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: Petronski; padfoot_lover

Fr. Kenneth Baker, SJ


32 posted on 05/06/2005 6:49:52 PM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: ndkos
Any response to complaints from U.S. bishops or Vatican officials would be made by the Jesuit General in Rome, the Rev. Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, and the 11 Jesuit leaders in the United States.

11 Jesuit leaders in the United States? Huh? I don't think there are 11 provinces in the US. Who are these 11 leaders?

33 posted on 05/06/2005 6:51:20 PM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: ELS

A few, select exceptions prove the rule.




(sheesh, tough crowd...)


34 posted on 05/06/2005 6:51:24 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: Petronski

A handful are good, but in general, as we know, the rest are lost sheep.


35 posted on 05/06/2005 6:52:52 PM PDT by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: netmilsmom; sandyeggo; GipperGal; scubandym
The coolest Holy Mass I saw on EWTN from the Vatican was the Maronite Holy Mass.

Even my Prebyterian hubby was enthralled by the Aramaic!


Ukrainian Cardinal Lubomyr Husar (L), Lebanese Cardinal Nasrallah Pierre Sfeir (C), and Syrian Cardinal Ignace Moussa I Daoud attend a mass at St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City April 14, 2005.

The Eastern Catholic Churches assembled to celebrate their Novendiales Mass on April 14, 2005. The chief celebrant was Mar Nasrallah Peter Cardinal Sfeir, Patriarch of the Maronite Church. For those of us who attend the Maronite Divine Liturgy, to watch it 'LIVE' from the Vatican, was awesome. In keeping with post VCII norms, the liturgy was celebrated in the vernacular ... in this instance, the vernacular was Arabic. However, the Trisagion, Institution Narrative (Consecration) and Epiclesis retained the original Aramaic text - the words spoken by our Lord, in His native tongue, at the Last Supper. The Maronite choir was flown in from Lebanon, equipped with authentic Middle Eastern instruments. You may have noticed that the choir was composed of religious - seminarians and those already ordained.

Here in the US, the same liturgy is chanted in English with those same sacred elements in Aramaic. If you are ever afforded the opportunity to attend a Maronite Divine Liturgy (or any other Eastern Catholic liturgy), take full advantage of it. The Maronite liturgy is one of the oldest in the Catholic Church, dating back to when St. Peter first brought the good news to Antioch. Many of the oldest Maronite Churches are built over the foundations of Jewish synagogues and to this day, the contemporary churches retain certain elements of the ancient synagogue designs in their construction.

In the Maronite liturgy, communion is by intinction and on the tongue. ONLY the priest or bishop, dips the consecrated host into the Precious Blood and places it on the tongue of the communicant with the words "The Body and Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ is given to you for the remission of sin and eternal salvation". There are NO Eucharistic Ministers or communion in the hand in the Maronite liturgy. A Roman Catholic may attend an Eastern Catholic liturgy and satisfy their Sunday obligation.

Check your local community at the following link and look into attending an Eastern Catholic Liturgy (not to be confused with the Orthodox Church).

Eastern Catholic Churches in the U.S.

The Eastern Catholic Rites retain the rich heritage of our church, without the "novelties" introduced into the Novus Ordo liturgy. Incense is used throughout.

36 posted on 05/06/2005 7:00:42 PM PDT by NYer ("Love without truth is blind; Truth without love is empty." - Pope Benedict XVI)
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To: Petronski

It's worse than NCR because it is "respected" by the NYSlimes and Time Mag-a-rag.

"Respected" Catholic publications are generally poison for real Catholics, and scandalous to their children.


37 posted on 05/06/2005 7:09:34 PM PDT by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
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To: Tamar1973; Arthur McGowan; HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity; BlackElk

At last count we could identify 12 US Jesuits who were actually Catholic.


38 posted on 05/06/2005 7:10:49 PM PDT by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
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To: Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek

Happens all the time.

But as you point out, there are certain, ah, problem children who WILL NOT SHUT UP.

However, Kung is not allowed to say he is a "Catholic" theologian--because in effect, he's not.

BTW, Ratzinger only slapped up about 5 of them. Should have fried those 5 and slapped up about 25 more. But he's a nice guy.


39 posted on 05/06/2005 7:13:25 PM PDT by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
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To: ninenot

That's a very good point.


40 posted on 05/06/2005 7:15:10 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: ELS

13 Jebbies per province, eh?


41 posted on 05/06/2005 7:16:02 PM PDT by ninenot (Minister of Membership, TomasTorquemadaGentlemen'sClub)
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To: ndkos

Fr. Thomas Reese is an advocate for gay rights, women priests, and is pro-abortion. I hope Reese's replacement will be faithful to the Magisterium.


42 posted on 05/06/2005 7:21:18 PM PDT by amdgmary (Please visit www.terrisfight.org and www.theempirejournal.com)
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To: SmithL

He was on the air as regularly as McBrien.


43 posted on 05/06/2005 7:23:21 PM PDT by RobbyS (JMJ)
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To: ndkos
The Vatican has at times taken aim at its independence.

Not at it's independence, but at it's willfullness in the matter of teaching ERROR to Catholics all over the world. It was Jesuits who told Teddy Kennedy and John Kerry and their ilk that they could still consider themselves good Catholics by publicly stating that they were 'personally opposed' to abortion all the while supporting it in legislation.

44 posted on 05/06/2005 7:26:50 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: ELS

http://www.jesuit.org/sections/default.asp?SECTION_ID=188

The United States Assistancy

Although Jesuits appear, just briefly, in Virginia and Florida in the late 16th and 17th centuries, the United States Assistancy (until recently called the American Assistancy), begins in 1634 with the arrival of Fr. Andrew White on St. Clement's Island in the Potomac River, off the shores of Maryland. The Assistancy today is made up of 10 Provinces comprising the 50 States.

The Jesuits of the United states maintain 70 secondary and primary schools serving 51,346 students staffed by 487 Jesuits, 7 technical institutions served by 4 Jesuits which served 3,131 students, 31 Universities and colleges with a total enrollment of 187,077 students served by 876 Jesuits, and 1 seminary serving 19 students in which 1 Jesuit works. There are 17 social apostolates operated by 39 Jesuits, 138 churches staffed by 307 Jesuits, 31 retreat houses served by 120 Jesuits and 7 spiritual centers served by 21 Jesuits.

A map of the United States shows the locations of the various Provinces in the American Assistancy .


45 posted on 05/06/2005 7:27:10 PM PDT by Peelod (Decentia est fragilis. Curatoribus validis indiget.)
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To: madprof98
When contacted Friday, Reese said only that his tenure ends on June 1 and that he would move immediately to California and continue in his Jesuit ministry.

Hmm . . . lots of evangelizing to be done on the Left Coast, I suppose.

I wonder if he'll end up at Loyola or USF. Frightening thoughts indeed.

46 posted on 05/06/2005 7:38:13 PM PDT by pbear8 (Navigatrix, TTGC, Ladies Aux)
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To: NYer

Don't forget Father Fessio and Cardinal Dulles. There are a few faithful Jesuits out there.


47 posted on 05/06/2005 8:07:42 PM PDT by Unam Sanctam
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To: Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
Has this [silencing] ever really happened in modern times, or is it merely that church representatives could declare that certain theologians could no longer represent themselves as Catholic theologians

How I wish some of these theologians were actually silenced. Instead they get columns in the New York Times. A priest's superior, whether his bishop or religious superior, can usually order a priest to remain silent on one thing or another. The only time I recall it happening recently was when Rev. James Burtchell(?) was ordered not to talk about the secularization of formerly religious universities both Catholic and Protestant, after he criticized the trend in his _Dying of the Light_. Frankly, such silencing is counterproductive with contemporary dissenting priests, since they won't even obey; only the upright ones would obey such an order.

Now that I think of it, the Jesuit Roger Haight might have been ordered not to teach his theories advanced in his incredibly heretical "Symbol of God" book. Don't remember if this was the case, or if he did in fact obey.

48 posted on 05/06/2005 8:08:34 PM PDT by Dumb_Ox (Be not Afraid. "Perfect love drives out fear.")
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To: Unam Sanctam

There actually are quite a few faithful Jesusits. My high school alma mater is generally orthodox. But the departure of Reese from America magazine is good news, and a portent of good things to come under Benedict XVI.


49 posted on 05/06/2005 8:10:09 PM PDT by Thorin ("I won't be reconstructed, and I do not give a damn.")
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To: ndkos
America hasn't produced a noteworthy article since the 2000 Ratzinger-Kasper exchange on ecclesiology. This editor could have been sacked for incompetence in addition to heresy years ago.

Check out this really crappy "poem" from their 2004 poetry contest. I'd post it here, but in addition to exhibiting non-existent writing ability, it also has a bit of discomforting imagery. It's a discredit to poetry in general and anti-war poetry in particular. Needless to say, it took the top prize of $1000(!).

50 posted on 05/06/2005 8:12:40 PM PDT by Dumb_Ox (Be not Afraid. "Perfect love drives out fear.")
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