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Hitler's Drugged Soldiers
Der Spiegel ^ | 06 May 2005 | Andreas Ulrich

Posted on 05/06/2005 10:57:50 PM PDT by Lando Lincoln

The Nazis preached abstinence in the name of promoting national health. But when it came to fighting their Blitzkrieg, they had no qualms about pumping their soldiers full of drugs and alcohol. Speed was the drug of choice, but many others became addicted to morphine and alcohol.

The stimulant Pervitin was delivered to the soldiers at the front.
Zoom
The stimulant Pervitin was delivered to the soldiers at the front.
In a letter dated November 9, 1939, to his "dear parents and siblings" back home in Cologne, a young soldier stationed in occupied Poland wrote: "It's tough out here, and I hope you'll understand if I'm only able to write to you once every two to four days soon. Today I'm writing you mainly to ask for some Pervitin ...; Love, Hein."

Pervitin, a stimulant commonly known as speed today, was the German army's -- the Wehrmacht's -- wonder drug.

On May 20, 1940, the 22-year-old soldier wrote to his family again: "Perhaps you could get me some more Pervitin so that I can have a backup supply?" And, in a letter sent from Bromberg on July 19, 1940, he wrote: "If at all possible, please send me some more Pervitin." The man who wrote these letters became a famous writer later in life. He was Heinrich Boell, and in 1972 he was the first German to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in the post-war period.

Many of the Wehrmacht's soldiers were high on Pervitin when they went into battle, especially against Poland and France -- in a Blitzkrieg fueled by speed. The German military was supplied with millions of methamphetamine tablets during the first half of 1940. The drugs were part of a plan to help pilots, sailors and infantry troops become capable of superhuman performance. The military leadership liberally dispensed such stimulants, but also alcohol and opiates, as long as it believed drugging and intoxicating troops could help it achieve victory over the Allies. But the Nazis were less than diligent in monitoring side-effects like drug addiction and a decline in moral standards.

Heinrich Boell as a soldier (around 1943): "Send me Pervitin."
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Heinrich Boell as a soldier (around 1943): "Send me Pervitin."
After it was first introduced into the market in 1938, Pervitin, a methamphetamine drug newly developed by the Berlin-based Temmler pharmaceutical company, quickly became a top seller among the German civilian population. According to a report in the Klinische Wochenschrift ("Clinical Weekly"), the supposed wonder drug was brought to the attention of Otto Ranke, a military doctor and director of the Institute for General and Defense Physiology at Berlin's Academy of Military Medicine. The effects of amphetamines are similar to those of the adrenaline produced by the body, triggering a heightened state of alert. In most people, the substance increases self-confidence, concentration and the willingness to take risks, while at the same time reducing sensitivity to pain, hunger and thirst, as well as reducing the need for sleep. In September 1939, Ranke tested the drug on 90 university students, and concluded that Pervitin could help the Wehrmacht win the war. At first Pervitin was tested on military drivers who participated in the invasion of Poland. Then, according to criminologist Wolf Kemper, it was "unscrupulously distributed to troops fighting at the front."

Thirty-five million tablets

During the short period between April and July of 1940, more than 35 million tablets of Pervitin and Isophan (a slightly modified version produced by the Knoll pharmaceutical company) were shipped to the German army and air force. Some of the tablets, each containing three milligrams of active substance, were sent to the Wehrmacht's medical divisions under the code name OBM, and then distributed directly to the troops. A rush order could even be placed by telephone if a shipment was urgently needed. The packages were labeled "Stimulant," and the instructions recommended a dose of one to two tablets "only as needed, to maintain sleeplessness."

Even then, doctors were concerned about the fact that the regeneration phase after taking the drug was becoming increasingly long, and that the effect was gradually decreasing among frequent users. In isolated cases, users experienced health problems like excessive perspiration and circulatory disorders, and there were even a few deaths. Leonardo Conti, the German Reich's minister of health and an adherent of Adolf Hitler's belief in asceticism, attempted to restrict the use of the pill, but was only moderately successful, at least when it came to the Wehrmacht. Although Pervitin was classified as a restricted substance on July 1, 1941, under the Opium Law, ten million tablets were shipped to troops that same year.

Pervitin was generally viewed as a proven drug to be used when soldiers were likely to be subjected to extreme stress. A memorandum for navy medical officers stated the following: "Every medical officer must be aware that Pervitin is a highly differentiated and powerful stimulant, a tool that enables him, at any time, to actively and effectively help certain individuals within his range of influence achieve above-average performance."

"Their spirits suddenly improved"

The effects were seductive. In January 1942, a group of 500 German soldiers stationed on the eastern front and surrounded by the Red Army were attempting to escape. The temperature was minus 30 degrees Celsius. A military doctor assigned to the unit wrote in his report that at around midnight, six hours into their escape through snow that was waist-deep in places, "more and more soldiers were so exhausted that they were beginning to simply lie down in the snow." The group's commanding officers decided to give Pervitin to their troops. "After half an hour," the doctor wrote, "the men began spontaneously reporting that they felt better. They began marching in orderly fashion again, their spirits improved, and they became more alert."

Towards the end of the war, Germany used younger and younger soldiers. More and more of them relied on drugs or alcohol for courage and endurance.
Zoom
DPA
Towards the end of the war, Germany used younger and younger soldiers. More and more of them relied on drugs or alcohol for courage and endurance.
It took almost six months for the report to reach the military's senior medical command. But its response was merely to issue new guidelines and instructions for using Pervitin, including information about risks that barely differed from earlier instructions. The "Guidelines for Detecting and Combating Fatigue," issued June 18, 1942, were the same as they had always been: "Two tablets taken once eliminate the need to sleep for three to eight hours, and two doses of two tablets each are normally effective for 24 hours."

Toward the end of the war, the Nazis were even working on a miracle pill for their troops. In the northern German seaport of Kiel, on March 16, 1944, then Vice-Admiral Hellmuth Heye, who later became a member of parliament with the conservative Christian Democratic party and head of the German parliament's defense committee, requested a drug "that can keep soldiers ready for battle when they are asked to continue fighting beyond a period considered normal, while at the same time boosting their self-esteem."

A short time later, Kiel pharmacologist Gerhard Orzechowski presented Heye with a pill code-named D-IX. It contained five milligrams of cocaine, three milligrams of Pervitin and five milligrams of Eukodal (a morphine-based painkiller). Nowadays, a drug dealer caught with this potent a drug would be sent to prison. At the time, however, the drug was tested on crew members working on the navy's smallest submarines, known as the "Seadog" and the "Beaver."

Alcohol consumption was encouraged

Alcohol, the people's drug, was also popular in the Wehrmacht. Referring to alcohol, Walter Kittel, a general in the medical corps, wrote that "only a fanatic would refuse to give a soldier something that can help him relax and enjoy life after he has faced the horrors of battle, or would reprimand him for enjoying a friendly drink or two with his comrades." Officers would distribute alcohol to their troops as a reward, and schnapps was routinely sold in military commissaries, a policy that also had the happy side effect of returning soldiers' pay to the military.

"The military command turned a blind eye to alcohol consumption, as long as it didn't lead to public drunkenness among the troops," says Freiburg historian Peter Steinkamp, an expert on drug abuse in the Wehrmacht.

But in July 1940, after France was defeated, Hitler issued the following order: "I expect that members of the Wehrmacht who allow themselves to be tempted to engage in criminal acts as a result of alcohol abuse will be severely punished." Serious offenders could even expect "a humiliating death."

Drugs were also a problem on the home front, but the Nazis tried harder to control their abuse.
Zoom
DPA
Drugs were also a problem on the home front, but the Nazis tried harder to control their abuse.
But the temptations of liquor were apparently more powerful that the Fuehrer's threats. Only a year later, the commander-in-chief of the German military, General Walther von Brauchitsch, concluded that his troops were committing "the most serious infractions" of morality and discipline, and that the culprit was "alcohol abuse." Among the adverse effects of alcohol abuse he cited were fights, accidents, mistreatment of subordinates, violence against superior officers and "crimes involving unnatural sexual acts." The general believed that alcohol was jeopardizing "discipline within the military."

According to an internal statistic compiled by the chief of the medical corps, 705 military deaths between September 1939 and April 1944 could be linked directly to alcohol. The unofficial figure was probably much higher, because traffic accidents, accidents involving weapons and suicides were frequently caused by alcohol use. Medical officers were instructed to admit alcoholics and drug addicts to treatment facilities. According to an order issued by the medical service, this solution had "the advantage that it could be extended indefinitely." Once incarcerated in these facilities, addicts were evaluated under the provisions of the "Law for Prevention of Offspring with Hereditary Diseases," and could even be subjected to forced sterilization and euthanasia.

Executing a bootlegger

The number of cases in which soldiers became blind or even died after consuming methyl alcohol began to increase. From 1939 on, the University of Berlin's Institute of Forensic Medicine consistently listed methyl alcohol as the leading factor in deaths resulting from the inadvertent ingestion of poisons.

The execution of a 36-year-old officer in Norway in the fall of 1942 was intended to set an example. The officer, who was a driver, had sold five liters of methyl alcohol, which he claimed was 98 percent alcohol and could be used to produce liquor, to an infantry regiment's anti-tank defense unit. Several soldiers fell ill, and two died. The man, deemed an "enemy of the people," was executed by a firing squad. According to the daily order issued on October 2, 1942, "the punishment shall be announced to the troops and auxiliary units, and it shall be used as a tool for repeated and insistent admonishment."

But soldiers apparently felt that anything that could help them escape the horrors of war was justifiable. Despite general knowledge of the risks involved, morphine addiction became widespread among the wounded and medical personnel during the course of the war. Four times as many military doctors were addicted to morphine by 1945 than at the beginning of the war.

Franz Wertheim, a medical officer who was sent to a small village near the Western Wall on May 10, 1940, wrote the following account: "To help pass the time, we doctors experimented on ourselves. We would begin the day by drinking a water glass of cognac and taking two injections of morphine. We found cocaine to be useful at midday, and in the evening we would occasionally take Hyoskin," an alkaloid derived from some varieties of the nightshade plant that is used as a medication. Wertheim adds: "As a result, we were not always fully in command of our senses."

German doctors experimented on themselves

To prevent an "outbreak of morphinism, as occurred after the last war," Professor Otto Wuth, a master sergeant and consulting psychiatrist to the military's senior medical command, wrote a "Proposal to Combat Morphinism" in February 1941. Under Wuth's proposal, all wounded who became addicted as a result of treatment were to be centrally recorded and reported to the "District Medical Board," where they would be either legally provided with morphine or routinely examined and sent to drug rehabilitation treatment centers. "In this manner," Wuth concluded, "morphine addicts will be recorded and monitored, and the entire group will be prevented from becoming criminal."

The Nazi leadership was more lenient with those who became drug-addicted as a result of the war than with alcoholics, probably because the Wehrmacht was concerned that it could be sued for damages, because it was in fact responsible for dispensing the drugs in the first place.

Translated from the German by Christopher Sultan
 


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Germany
KEYWORDS: godsgravesglyphs; hitler; nazigermany; substanceabuse; wodlist; wwii
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Lando

1 posted on 05/06/2005 10:57:50 PM PDT by Lando Lincoln
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To: Lando Lincoln; Alouette; Salem; SJackson

I'm shocked, but not surprised - this is a logical extension of what happens when the individual exists to serve the state, rather than the other way around.


2 posted on 05/06/2005 11:05:15 PM PDT by Slings and Arrows ("You would have to double your IQ to be stupid. " --zip)
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To: Lando Lincoln

Very interesting. Doesn't prolonged speed use cause paranoia? Of course in combat that wouldn't be so bad because a lot of people really are out to kill you.:)


3 posted on 05/06/2005 11:05:27 PM PDT by xJones
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To: Lando Lincoln

You wouldn't believe how much Folger's and Mt. Dew an Army battalion can go through in a week.


4 posted on 05/06/2005 11:10:22 PM PDT by struwwelpeter
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To: Lando Lincoln

I've always been told that they used methadone to keep the soldiers coming back. We use it in the US to treat heroin addicts (they basically replace heroin with methadone). As I understand it, an addiction to methadone is actually harder to break than one to heroin.


5 posted on 05/06/2005 11:12:44 PM PDT by Jaysun (The road to despotism is paved with "fairness")
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To: Lando Lincoln

MAINTAINING HUMAN COMBAT PERFORMANCE
Preventing Sleep Deprivation
http://www.darpa.mil/dso/thrust/biosci/cap.htm


Amphetamines were also used by the British
during WWII. During Vietnam both
the Air Force and Navy made amphetamines available to
aviators. Intermittently since Vietnam up through Desert
Storm the Air Force has used both amphetamines and
sedatives in selected aircraft for specific missions.


6 posted on 05/06/2005 11:16:52 PM PDT by endthematrix (Declare 2005 as the year the battle for freedom from tax slavery!)
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To: struwwelpeter

Caffeine (and triptofan from your holiday turkey) is about the only drug of choice left. Nicotine and aclcohol aren't PC in today's military.


7 posted on 05/06/2005 11:17:32 PM PDT by BradyLS (DO NOT FEED THE BEARS!)
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To: Lando Lincoln

Maybe future historians will re-name the Nazi military offensive as Blitzed-Krieg!


8 posted on 05/06/2005 11:20:04 PM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: Lando Lincoln

What were the the French given then, Quaaludes?


9 posted on 05/06/2005 11:21:41 PM PDT by Imaverygooddriver (ALL YOU BASE ARE BELONG TO US)
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To: BradyLS

If the US military PC mafia had been around in 1941...the US would have won the war...but it would have been 1950 before that occurred.


10 posted on 05/06/2005 11:21:50 PM PDT by pepsionice
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To: Slings and Arrows
Friendly fire deaths linked to US pilots 'on speed'

Remember the two Air National Guard F-16 pilots that mistook Canadians for the Taliban?

"Lawyers for the two airmen, Maj. Harry Schmidt and Maj. William Umbach, contend the military pressured their clients to take the go pills — as the prescription amphetamine Dexedrine is called in the military."
11 posted on 05/06/2005 11:26:41 PM PDT by endthematrix (Declare 2005 as the year the battle for freedom from tax slavery!)
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To: Lando Lincoln; archy; Travis McGee; wardaddy; big ern

Nazi Meth is as popular today as it was with the .......nazi's.

Cookers are dumped like litter along the old farm/ranch roads, anhydrous ammonia tanks are secured like gold in ranchers barns w/ alarms and CCTV coverage paid for in some part by local WOD task forces....

But I can remember being issued something we called black beauties in 73 for E&E use. Even recently we saw the issue of "pills" for pilots on extreme range missions.

Good read......


12 posted on 05/06/2005 11:27:20 PM PDT by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But, have a plan to kill everyone you meet. )
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To: Lando Lincoln

It was really called 'Pervertin?'


My goodness.






(Nice piece of history there, too. Thx)


13 posted on 05/06/2005 11:27:45 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: xJones

Hitler was a drug addict too. His personal doctor gave him daily meth injections and he was also provided eyedrops laced with narcotics.


14 posted on 05/06/2005 11:29:56 PM PDT by Petronski (Pope Benedict XVI: A German Shepherd on the Throne of Peter)
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To: Lando Lincoln
After it was first introduced into the market in 1938, Pervitin, a methamphetamine drug newly developed by the Berlin-based Temmler pharmaceutical company, quickly became a top seller among the German civilian population

Like any other business, a drug company needs a market.

15 posted on 05/06/2005 11:32:49 PM PDT by GVnana
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To: Lando Lincoln

This isn't new news. This is very widely done around the world. The US military still does it to this day. Do a search online for "go pills".


16 posted on 05/06/2005 11:34:44 PM PDT by killjoy (Real Men Love Bush)
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To: Lando Lincoln

bttt


17 posted on 05/06/2005 11:35:11 PM PDT by nopardons
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To: Imaverygooddriver

I had read in a different news post that the terrorists in iraq are also hooked on drugs and thus able to withstand being shot at and can still fight back even after shots in vital areas that would render a normal soldier incapacitated.


18 posted on 05/06/2005 11:39:30 PM PDT by 1FASTGLOCK45 (FreeRepublic: More fun than watching Dem'Rats drown like Turkeys in the rain! ! !)
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To: GVgirl
It survived the war and competition.

Temmler Pharma today

Today, Temmler Pharma is an independent pharmaceutical company with over 145 in-house employees, plus sales staff. Business centres on three core areas, reflected by the source of our business in 2004: out of sales totalling 34.0 million euros, just over 41% was generated with Temmler Pharma branded products, at home and in around 50 export markets; just under 60% of turnover came from contract manufacturing and development projects.

19 posted on 05/06/2005 11:39:57 PM PDT by endthematrix (Declare 2005 as the year the battle for freedom from tax slavery!)
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To: Lando Lincoln
‘Go pills’: A war on drugs?

Air Force use of amphetamines raises questions

20 posted on 05/06/2005 11:40:23 PM PDT by WildPlum
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To: Imaverygooddriver

Dutch courage?


21 posted on 05/06/2005 11:53:42 PM PDT by nickcarraway (I'm Only Alive, Because a Judge Hasn't Ruled I Should Die...)
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To: Imaverygooddriver

LOL! Whatever it is, they're STILL on it!


22 posted on 05/06/2005 11:56:34 PM PDT by tanuki
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To: killjoy

Apparently, everybody used amphetamines in WWII as well: Germans, Japanese, Soviets, also US and British. It looks like it was a bigger thing with the Germans than with us or the British, though. Kamikazis used meth -- it had been developed by Japanese chemists in 1919 -- and addiction became a real problem in Japan. Hitler had it injected intravenously himself.


23 posted on 05/07/2005 12:11:32 AM PDT by x
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To: Lando Lincoln; wardaddy; Joe Brower; Cannoneer No. 4; Criminal Number 18F; Dan from Michigan; ...
Great catch! I was under the impression that the German Army only started to use amphetamines, aka speed, only after they had become desparate on the Russian front. That they were using it during the offensives in Poland and France is noteworthy. Their combination with opiates reminds me of reports about jihadis and the Fallujah offensive in November 2004.

From time to time, I’ll ping on noteworthy articles about politics, foreign and military affairs. FReepmail me if you want on or off my list.

24 posted on 05/07/2005 12:43:24 AM PDT by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: Jaysun

From the history I've read. Methadone was made by the Nazi's. Dolphine is it's name after you know who ... And there was a shortage in Germany of Morphine so they came up with Methadone (Dolphine).....


25 posted on 05/07/2005 12:52:20 AM PDT by Deetes (Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick)
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To: neverdem

There is nothing secret about the means of making meth. Meth “recipes” are widely known and readily available over the internet. The most common meth “recipe” in Illinois is called the “Birch reduction method” or – more commonly – the “Nazi method” (because the German government used it during World War II). A second method that is common in the western United States but less common in Illinois is known as the “red phosphorous” or “red-P” method.

Whether a meth “cook” uses the “Nazi method” or the “red-P” method, he cannot make meth without ephedrine or pseudoephedrine – substances found in Sudafed, Claratin, and other over-the-counter cold medications that are widely available in local drug stores, supermarkets, and truck stops. Ephedrine and pseudoephedrine are to methamphetamine what flour is to bread – THE essential ingredient.

Ephedrine or pseudoephedrine become methamphetamine by means of a chemical reaction. A meth maker using the Nazi method (common in Illinois) brings about this chemical reaction by combining the ephedrine or pseudoephedrine with two other ingredients: anhydrous ammonia (a liquified fertilizer) and lithium (a metal extracted from lithium batteries). By contrast, a meth maker using the red-P method (less common in Illinois) produces methamphetamine by combining ephedrine or pseudoephedrine with red phosphorous, iodine crystals, and water.

While these chemical reactions are the essential step required to turn ephedrine or pseudoephedrine into methamphetamine, both the Nazi method and the red-P method involve additional steps both before and after these chemical reactions. For typical meth cook in Illinois, using the Nazi method, the entire process of making a batch of methamphetamine lasts about four hours from start to finish.


26 posted on 05/07/2005 12:54:06 AM PDT by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But, have a plan to kill everyone you meet. )
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To: Lando Lincoln
Fascinating. I love how it helped pervert the Nazi's from within. Kind of like a parasite that eats its host.

I'm glad the repercussions set in. They were a hellish nightmare in all ways.

And we kicked their sorry asses.
27 posted on 05/07/2005 12:56:55 AM PDT by ConservativeMind
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To: neverdem

bttt


28 posted on 05/07/2005 1:00:26 AM PDT by lainde
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To: Deetes
From the history I've read. Methadone was made by the Nazi's. Dolphine is it's name after you know who ... And there was a shortage in Germany of Morphine so they came up with Methadone (Dolphine).....

Who is it named after? I've read that the "dol" in dolphine is from the Latin root "dolor". The term "dol" is used in pain research to measure pain (one dol = one unit of pain).
29 posted on 05/07/2005 1:22:30 AM PDT by Jaysun (The road to despotism is paved with "fairness")
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To: Lando Lincoln
Well, when you are stuck in a frozen wasteland, short of proper supplies and clothing, and outnumbered 4 to 1 by the enemy who is defending his home turf, I suppose there is some kind of twisted logic in having your soldiers being able to fight 24/7 so to speak.

Hitler himself was almost certainly addicted to Methamphetamines staarting as early as 1935, when he hired Dr. Teodor Morell to treat him for his (hushed up) Syphillis. Morell was supposedly the ranking expert on this disease, so it seems logical that this would be a reason why Hitler chose him.

But Dr. Morell also had a home meth lab and soon graduated to giving der Fuhrer his 'Vitamultin' injections daily, which consisted of speed, more speed, vitamins and Lord-knows-what-else.

We know that, during the war, an SS lab managed to get a hold of a dose of Vitamultin and analysed it because of a rumor that Morell was poisoning Hitler. The results were so concerning that two SS doctors advised Hitler that he should fire Morell immediately. Instead, the two SS doctors were relieved of their duties.

You might say its not a good idea to get between an addict and his supplier. Some of Hitler's stupidest impulsive decisions (like the order to stand and not retreat at Stalingrad) appear quite likely to have been made during periods of Methamphetamine-induced mania lasting for days.

To switch theaters, the Japanese often gave plenty of Sake to their soldiers prior to a charge against the enemy; often the officers would assemble the men on the battlefield (following the imbibing) and given them speeches exhorting them to fight.

The drunken fanatics would then charge Marine machinegun positions with predictable results.

For all their fanaticism (which even exceeded that of the Germans in some ways), this was a losing tactic for sure.

Bullets beat Bushido every time ;-)


30 posted on 05/07/2005 1:28:45 AM PDT by Al Simmons ("God Ain't Jive" - Mott The Hoople)
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To: Deetes
As to the name Dolophine, here's what I just found:

Methadone was first called "Hoechst 10820" and Bockmühl and Ehrhart filed a patent application in September 1941. The agent was later named "Polamidon" in Germany, and much later generically called methadone). The name "Dolophine" was originated at Eli Lilly & Co. in the U.S. long after the war, and was probably derived from the French dolor (pain) and fin (end). Although, some have claimed the “Dol-” portion came from dol, which is a unit measure of pain (derived from dolor), and “-ophine” was derived from morphine.
31 posted on 05/07/2005 1:29:16 AM PDT by Jaysun (The road to despotism is paved with "fairness")
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To: Lando Lincoln

I remember being struck in an account of the Abbeville Kids about the amount of alcohol those pilots consumed, and how early in the day they started. There certainly didn't appear to be any "bottle to throttle" rule for them.


32 posted on 05/07/2005 1:30:34 AM PDT by snowsislander
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Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: Stalinist; Admin Moderator

NEGONE, TROLL!


34 posted on 05/07/2005 1:58:30 AM PDT by Clemenza (I am NOT A NUMBER, I am a FREE MAN!!!)
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To: Jaysun

Very interesting . I learned something else today , and just found another bit of urban legend .....


35 posted on 05/07/2005 1:58:41 AM PDT by Deetes (Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick)
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To: Deetes
Very interesting . I learned something else today , and just found another bit of urban legend .....

Me too. Hey, I can't wait to put a few oil derricks in your "back yard". Think we'll get to?
36 posted on 05/07/2005 2:12:09 AM PDT by Jaysun (The road to despotism is paved with "fairness")
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To: Stalinist
What is difference between Bush and Stalin and Hitler? Bush have lower IQ.

Tee hee hee hee...
Drink bleach assrabbit.
37 posted on 05/07/2005 2:13:50 AM PDT by Jaysun (The road to despotism is paved with "fairness")
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To: Jaysun

Well , I'm in Alaska . So it might not be a bad idea .... Although probably break rule or two...


38 posted on 05/07/2005 2:24:20 AM PDT by Deetes (Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick)
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To: Lando Lincoln
The execution of a 36-year-old officer in Norway in the fall of 1942 was intended to set an example. The officer, who was a driver,

Having an officer serve as a driver doesn't sound right. Perhaps the problem is with the translation.

39 posted on 05/07/2005 2:28:20 AM PDT by PAR35
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Comment #40 Removed by Moderator

To: Deetes
Well , I'm in Alaska . So it might not be a bad idea .... Although probably break rule or two...

I know you're in Alaska (hence the comment on drilling for oil). I'm pretty sure they've passed something saying that we can go to ANWAR in the Senate.
41 posted on 05/07/2005 3:13:20 AM PDT by Jaysun (The road to despotism is paved with "fairness")
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To: Occupation; Admin Moderator

42 posted on 05/07/2005 3:17:26 AM PDT by SkyPilot
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To: Lando Lincoln

Methamphetamine was issued to US combat troops too. We had it issued in foil pop out strips in 1968 – it was a lot better than falling asleep at the wrong time.


43 posted on 05/07/2005 3:23:29 AM PDT by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink.)
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To: ConservativeMind

War on drugs meant something different back then.


44 posted on 05/07/2005 3:46:42 AM PDT by Enterprise (Abortion and "euthanasia" - the twin destroyers of the Democrat Party.)
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To: snowsislander

I flew helicopters in Vietnam, 1971-72. The twelve hours between bottle and throttle rule was observed. Sometimes I flew with a hungover pilot (the whump-whump-whump of the rotors was torture!) but never with an incapacitated one. We drank beer after the mission day was over, but you'd better hit the deck at oh-dark-thirty when the OD woke you (one hour from wakeup to startup). BTW, alcohol consumption was a healthy sign: the dopers and heads never touched the stuff. And yes, it helps to relax.

Last year I was deployed near Afghanistan. General Order Number One: no alcohol. Fine, I can lay off for a year. But when I asked the commander (one star) whether GO1 was for the troops' welfare or simply not to offend the Muslims, he snapped, "Of course it's so we don't offend the Muslims!"

Stay-awake pills for pilots is one thing, but High Wired Huns is new to me.


45 posted on 05/07/2005 3:50:03 AM PDT by elcid1970
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To: Occupation; SkyPilot

Who was Herman Hering?

46 posted on 05/07/2005 3:50:54 AM PDT by Enterprise (Abortion and "euthanasia" - the twin destroyers of the Democrat Party.)
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To: Enterprise; Occupation
Who was Herman Hering?

I think he was related to the Italian dictator, Moosealini.


47 posted on 05/07/2005 4:20:11 AM PDT by SkyPilot
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To: Occupation; Admin Moderator

Begone troll.


48 posted on 05/07/2005 4:48:03 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Official Ruling Class Oligarch Oppressor)
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To: Lando Lincoln

I thought that amphetamines were only given to Luftwaffe pilots--I never knew they were also distributed to the Wehrmacht. Interesting article...thanks.


49 posted on 05/07/2005 4:54:25 AM PDT by Pharmboy ("Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God")
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To: Enterprise; Occupation

Herman Hering? Something sounds fishy to me...


50 posted on 05/07/2005 5:11:38 AM PDT by Tennessee_Bob (The Crew Chief's Toolbox: A roll around cabinet full of specialists.)
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