Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Invasion of the iPod people
Knight Ridder ^ | 5.4.05

Posted on 05/07/2005 11:28:05 AM PDT by ambrose







Posted on Wed, May. 04, 2005


Invasion of the iPod people


Knight Ridder Newspapers

(KRT) - When Kate Wolfe-Jenson turns in at night, she often can't keep her mind from racing. "I'm thinking my late-night thoughts," she says.

She tried using audiobooks to help her calm down and doze off. But this system worked imperfectly because she used audiotapes, which she had to flip over at regular intervals that kept her awake.

Then, she switched to an iPod digital-music player and found bedtime bliss.

Wolfe-Jenson, one of millions who use Apple Computer's iconic handheld devices, places her iPod at her bedside and tucks the player's signature white earbuds under her pillow. With the volume cranked up, she can hear one of Terry Pratchett's "Discworld" fantasy novels well enough to become immersed in the story and, before long, drop off.

Silicon Valley, Calif., resident Wolfe-Jenson and her husband, Ralph Jenson, are citizens of the so-called iPod Nation. That's the name often applied to the mushrooming number of Americans who have embraced the devices and come to depend on them in sometimes-unusual, not-always-music-related ways.

Apple has sold more than 10 million iPods since introducing an initial version of the device in October 2001. Of those, more than 8 million were sold in 2004, and nearly 5 million were sold during the last quarter of the year alone. The devices, which have gone through four generations, now dominate the digital-player market.

They range from the low-cost ($150), Juicy Fruit-sized iPod shuffle gizmos to high-end iPod Photos ($450) with capacious hard drives and color screens for showing digital photos. A black-and-red iPod is aimed at fans of the Irish rock band U2. Curvy, compact iPod minis in bright hues are intended for the style-savvy.

And now, it seems, those easy-to-spot earbuds are everywhere.

---

Wolfe-Jenson and Jenson have more than done their part to iPod-ize the nation. The couple and their daughter, Alexis, are a four-iPod household, which isn't all that unusual anymore.

In addition to the iPod at Wolfe-Jenson's bedside, there are the first-generation model Jenson uses to keep computer files and the newer iPod he takes on bicycle commutes -- he buds up one ear but keeps the other free for safety -- and the iPod mini the family uses on road trips, with tunes and audiobooks piped wirelessly through the car's radio.

"Absolutely not a day goes by when we're not using at least one of the players each, or maybe two," Jenson says.

The iPods' popularity has spawned a booming secondary market in iPod accessories -- more than 400 of them, by one recent estimate -- in what some have nicknamed the iPod Economy. Such add-on gear ranges from mounting devices and protective cases in all colors and textures to devices that help the minimalist iPods take on new chores.

When Lynn Huiskamp of rural River Falls, Wis., coaches her girl swimmers at a local high school, she blares music via a boom box to keep the teens motivated and entertained during grueling practices. She used music CDs for a time but had trouble keeping track of them. She later switched to CDs containing MP3 files, more of which can be put on a disc, but the platters were prone to skipping or stuttering just as the girls were getting into their grooves.

She found salvation in her gold-colored iPod mini, which she received as a Christmas gift from her husband, Jay Esch, along with a Griffin add-on dubbed the iTrip mini. The FM transmitter serves as a wireless bridge between iPod and boom box, which Huiskamp tunes to a blank spot on the FM band so the iPod's contents are heard over the speakers.

"At first, the girls didn't know where the music was coming from," the coach said. "Then they got excited. We said, `Yeah, Apple needs to come and do a commercial.'"

---

With sound-recording attachments, iPod users can use their players as the digital equivalents of tape recorders in classrooms or in their work.

Kevin Hendricks, a St. Paul, Minn.-based freelance writer, hated his old tape-based recorder with cassettes that needed to be flipped over at intervals during interviews. "It was just kind of pain listening to it because you had to fast-forward across the whole tape" to find specific portions of conversations, he said.

His iPod with a Griffin iTalk add-on works like a digital voice recorder -- except, with a 40-gigabyte hard drive, he is able to store hours upon hours of interviews. "I can go on a trip somewhere and do 10 interviews in a day," he said.

His only problem: Before interviews, he must spend a few minutes satisfying his subjects' inevitable iPod curiosity.

Terry Snell, a professor in the Georgia Institute of Technology's biology department, has taken iPod-based sound recording to a delicious extreme. His 20-gigabyte iPod is hooked to a high-quality mic with a parabolic reflector to concentrate and collect sounds – bird calls, to be exact.

The sounds are then saved to a laptop so Snell and his students can analyze them using ornithological software, such as Canary or Raven, "which allow us to estimate frequency, call rate, etc."

What's more, they can use the iPod to play back the calls and record the birds' responses. "The iPod allows us to get into the field with a whole library of professionally recorded songs," he said.

In iPods' longstanding role as high-capacity portable hard drives, they have often proved to be lifesavers because of their ability to safely stockpile vast amounts of digital data.

Maplewood, Minn., attorney Thomas Tuft decided to back up all his firm's computer files onto his iPod one day. He was wandering by the office's computer-network server when he spotted a high-speed FireWire port in front. On a whim, he used his iPod's computer-syncing cable to plug in and move the files -- about 2 gigabytes of data -- to the player.

Good thing: A day or so later, the office's network server crashed and took every document with it. He did have another backup, but it wasn't as up-to-date as the one on the iPod. So when he moved the duplicate files on the player to a spare computer, he got the firm up and running in no time.

---

Linda Cullen's new iPod already may be among the most-traveled. The St. Paul, Minn.-based photojournalist, who has worked in such locales as Afghanistan, Iraq, Istanbul, Sri Lanka and Thailand, bought an iPod Photo as a Christmas present to herself.

Now, she uses it to back up the photos on her Apple iBook laptop. She also loads up her Arabic and Farsi language lessons along with music, audiobooks and recorded National Public Radio programs for those long hours on planes (she is unable to read in the air because of chronic motion sickness).

As a photographer, showing off photos on the iPod Photo's color screen comes in handy on planes when she tells fellow travelers about her work and in photo-shooting situations when she needs to break the ice with potential subjects.

Cullen was disappointed with her iPod's less-than-stellar internal-battery life, a common user complaint. She licked the problem with an add-on Belkin battery pack that uses four standard AAs.

Minneapolis, Minn., graphic designer Tod Foley uses his iPod as a personal organizer containing his calendar and contact information, a simple if sometimes-overlooked trick for those synchronizing their players with Macintosh computers. (Windows users must install extra software to pull this off.)

"That's a nice feature to have at the post office," Foley said. "If I need my brother's address, I can scroll through the address book, and there it is."

---

For many iPod users, of course, the devices are mainly if not solely about tunes. They'll load up their players with hundreds or thousands of songs ripped from CDs or purchased on Apple's iTunes online music store. Then, they'll fire up the iPods for their workouts or their morning commutes and often sing to the music at the top of their lungs.

In Sheri Hansen's case, that often involves classical pieces, such as Mozart's Vespers or Bach's Magnificat, during her morning-drive jam sessions. The Eagan, Minn., woman has a special reason for such glorified choices: She's an amateur alto rehearsing for Oratorio Society of Minnesota performances.

Apple's iTunes store has been a blessing, she says, because of its extensive classical-music selection. Once she has downloaded a practice piece to her iPod and fired up her iTrip mini, "it's like being in your own little concert hall. You can make it as soft or as loud as you want." She has been laughed at, she admits, as she lets loose on her commutes to her public-relations day job in Minneapolis.

Hansen isn't focused solely on classical music. She and her husband, Bill, are so fond of the rock group U2 that their three-iPod set includes the U2 special edition with a black front and red scrolling wheel. They don't dare let that one out of the house because they don't want to scuff the mirror-metal back engraved with band autographs. Hansen's husband gave her "The Complete U2," an iTunes set with 446 songs, a digital booklet and band commentary.

---

Katie Condon and John Jodzio are wild about music, too, but they needed a good excuse to pop for something as pricey as an iPod. So, the Minneapolis couple decided they'd use a yet-to-be-purchased player as the digital disc jockey at their upcoming wedding dance -- cheaper than hiring a live band or a human DJ, they figured, and boasting many more musical choices. They'll likely tap one of their groomsmen as an iPod minder during the August celebration.

Now, they face the daunting task of loading up the iPod with all their music and creating suitable play lists. They're jotting down song ideas in a notebook and asking the advice of friends "whose musical tastes we trust," Condon said. They're also planning live-music segments courtesy of musician friends and relatives so the dance won't become too tech-impersonal.

No one is more iPod-fanatical than Josie Lonetti, a 12-year-old St. Paul resident. She recently bought a blue iPod mini after getting a refund on a sewing machine a well-meaning relative gave her for Christmas, then throwing in some of her savings and a bit of extra money she sweet-talked out of her father, Jim, by offering to do chores.

"I was a total suck-up," she admits.

Now, she has more than 400 songs on her player, ranging from the Go-Gos to Sum 41, along with her baby-sitting schedule and contact information for her friends and relatives. She tucks the iPod in her backpack when she goes to school, and she uses it while walking to pick up her 5-year-old brother at day care.

She shares her iPod passion with her father, who keeps a larger version around for family use and who has been known to sneak music onto his daughter's player in horizon-broadening attempts.

"On the first day I got my iPod, I kissed it good night, and my little sister called me an insane freak," Josie says. "Now, my best friend wants one, but she wants it in pink, and she is using me as an example to her parents on why she should get one"

.---

© 2005, St. Paul Pioneer Press (St. Paul, Minn.).

Visit the World Wide Web site of the Pioneer Press at http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/

Distributed by Knight Ridder/Tribune Information Services.





© 2005 KRT Wire and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.fortwayne.com



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: ipod
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-146 next last

1 posted on 05/07/2005 11:28:05 AM PDT by ambrose
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

Comment #2 Removed by Moderator

To: ambrose

3 posted on 05/07/2005 11:29:49 AM PDT by Andy from Beaverton (I only vote Republican to stop the Democrats)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

I must've crossed over into Fuddy-Duddyville, because I do not understand the fascination with these things. I mean, I LOVE music as much as the next guy (I'm listening to Paris Cafe-type music right now), but to be plugged in like this at all times is a turn-off to me. I secretly hate my cellphone, too, but it was a gift from The Hub so I don't say that out loud. Ever.

And as a sleep aid? I need it absolutely black-out conditions and absolutely dead quiet to fall sleep. (Too many years of being a Mom and having one ear "on" at all times, I guess.)


4 posted on 05/07/2005 11:34:35 AM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ambrose
We are a three-iPod family and I love the little buggers. I listen to music from time to time, but it is also great being able to keep backups of my critical data in a box the size of a pack of cigarettes. My kids are plugged in constantly.

That said, this article makes me think there is someone at Apple PR providing sexual favors to someone at the newspaper.

-ccm

5 posted on 05/07/2005 11:38:16 AM PDT by ccmay (Question Diversity)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin

I don't know how many CDs you own... but let's say you own a hundred or so... imagine having that entire collection held inside a tiny device that weighs only a few ounces, can be taken anywhere with you, played in your car, on your home stereo, or while out on a walk?

The device automatically organizes your music by Artist, Album and even Genre.. That lets you have access to your most obscure and least-listened CD in a matter of seconds... As opposed to fumbling piles of CDs, pulling them out of their case, loading them up one at a time, and listening.

That's the iPod.


6 posted on 05/07/2005 11:39:19 AM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin

I traded in my cell for an ipod :-)


7 posted on 05/07/2005 11:39:46 AM PDT by cyborg (Serving fresh, hot Anti-opus since 18 April 2005)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

I love mine. I love it even more now that Art Bell is pod casting. I have mostly meditation music and audiobooks with a little music. I never leave him without it and if I do, I'm royally p'oed!


8 posted on 05/07/2005 11:41:30 AM PDT by cyborg (Serving fresh, hot Anti-opus since 18 April 2005)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

Yeah, I know what they do, even from way out here in Fuddy-Duddyville, LOL! My teen has one.

And yes, I do have too many CDs...and I still have a cassette player in my car with my 70's Rock tapes, and a VCR...and an old toaster oven, a Princess Phone with a dial on it (still works fine) and my old 8-tracks are still up in the attic...

I think you can see where this conversation is going, LOL! ;)


9 posted on 05/07/2005 11:44:55 AM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ambrose
The wife bought me a 60 GB iPod. I listen more to audiobooks than music, but I have tons and tons of each on it.

She even had it engraved! "Tre," as in tertiary.


10 posted on 05/07/2005 11:50:14 AM PDT by rdb3 (To the world, you're one person. To one person, you may be the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin
I know I know... some people also resisted turning in their stacks of carbon paper for a copying machine.

In the end, Resistance is futile.
11 posted on 05/07/2005 11:50:30 AM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

Yeah, but how's the audio quality?

My impression is that they use compressed JPEGs or something -- in otherwords, not CD quality. Is this correct?


12 posted on 05/07/2005 11:52:31 AM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: rdb3; cyborg

I also love listening to Audio Books. Have you looked at Audible.com? I have been very happy with Audible. As long as you stick to the two books a month deal, it is fairly inexpensive.


13 posted on 05/07/2005 11:52:50 AM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick
My impression is that they use compressed JPEGs or something -- in otherwords, not CD quality. Is this correct?

It uses compression technology, but I can't tell the difference. I doubt 99.9% of the population could either.

14 posted on 05/07/2005 11:54:21 AM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

I know. But my Five Year Plan is to stash a lotta cash and be outta here and living in a remote cabin on about 10 acres in the wild and wooly woods of Wisconsin, where my only contact will be with Nature, and, of course, eventually, the ATF guys... ;)

(Think Scott & Helen Nearing, without all the radical communistic political overtones.)


15 posted on 05/07/2005 11:55:53 AM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

I just use a I gig memory card on my PDA.

does the same job and get the high quality.


16 posted on 05/07/2005 11:56:47 AM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick
My impression is that they use compressed JPEGs or something -- in otherwords, not CD quality. Is this correct?

The audio quality is excellent! My music files are encoded at either 160 or 192Kbps. It thumps. And I can dock it to external speakers to share with everyone if I want.


17 posted on 05/07/2005 11:58:21 AM PDT by rdb3 (To the world, you're one person. To one person, you may be the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

I'm ultra-persnickety. I'd hear the difference. The quality issue is the only thing keeping me from being interested in the iPod.


18 posted on 05/07/2005 11:59:32 AM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory

I do the same thing, with a PDA I got for free as a door prize attending some event. I think I paid $75 for the 1G memory stick.


19 posted on 05/07/2005 12:00:11 PM PDT by FreedomPoster (Official Ruling Class Oligarch Oppressor)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: rdb3

Is it as good as a CD?

I'm just going to have to listen to one of these things some time and see what they sound like. There's no denying the convenience and portability factor.


20 posted on 05/07/2005 12:02:00 PM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: FreedomPoster

What I like about using my PDA as a music player is that it will allow my calendar program to pop in over the music and remind me about appointments or meetings.

I am very surprised MS did not emphasis this UNDER used feature of their PocketPC system.

I view the Ipod (and mp3 players, as just neutered computers. The Ipod more so since it is Itunes dependent)


21 posted on 05/07/2005 12:04:21 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick

The iPod comes with cheap headphones. I recently purchased Sony V600s, and the sound that comes out of them is outstanding. I suppose someone with ultra sensitive ears will claim to tell a difference, but I'd like to see Audiophiles who make this claim blindfold tested under lab conditions.


22 posted on 05/07/2005 12:04:27 PM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick

It all depends on the file, on my PDA i have CD quality if I want it. (usually only for certain songs)


23 posted on 05/07/2005 12:05:52 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

I've got more than 3 times that many CDs at work, which is about 1/15 of my collection, then there's the LPs and cassettes. With half way descent organization I've got access to my CDs at least as easily as an iPod, and don't have to futz with things to listen to them in album order (which is generally better, at least with artists that have been around a while and know how to construct an album).

I see iPods as pretty handy for your casual music listener, but completely worthless for somebody like me.


24 posted on 05/07/2005 12:06:01 PM PDT by discostu (quis custodiet ipsos custodes)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory

Does the PDA organize the music by album/artist/genre/etc.? The iPod software is one the biggest selling point, in my opinion.


25 posted on 05/07/2005 12:07:29 PM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: ambrose
I have a subscription to Audible.com. I wish I could download more than just two per month, however.

Working on my Shakespeare collection now.


26 posted on 05/07/2005 12:11:30 PM PDT by rdb3 (To the world, you're one person. To one person, you may be the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
What I like about using my PDA as a music player is that it will allow my calendar program to pop in over the music and remind me about appointments or meetings. I am very surprised MS did not emphasis this UNDER used feature of their PocketPC system. I view the Ipod (and mp3 players, as just neutered computers. The Ipod more so since it is Itunes dependent)

My palm Tunsten E will also play MP3s. PDAs are very cool for the computer-saavy. For some they are impossible.

I don't have a negative view of music-only devices. The are the 21st century equivalent of the Walkman. If people are willing to pay for such, that's capitalism at work.

I like capitalism.

27 posted on 05/07/2005 12:12:35 PM PDT by LibKill (Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

No doubt the headphones make a huge difference. But it's very clear to me that compressed audio just isn't the same as real audio. The dynamic range is audibly reduced as well as the detail in the top end. I don't perceive it as a trivial difference at all.

Of course, there are different degrees of compression. Some compression just totally kills the music, but I guess there are other types that are probably pretty transparent.

Like I said to rdb3, I'm just going to take a listen to an iPod some time.


28 posted on 05/07/2005 12:12:59 PM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin
I know what you mean, I love music and am presently in tube amp bliss but I can't for the life of me get excited about an Ipod. If they were a little cheaper maybe. What can I say, I still love vinyl records.
29 posted on 05/07/2005 12:14:02 PM PDT by Lx (Do you like it, do you like it Scott? I call it Mr. and Mrs. Tennerman chili.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick
Is it as good as a CD?

As good as or better, but definitely not worse. Most files played from a CD in your computer are at 96 to 128Kbps. All of mine in my iPod are at 160 or 192Kbps. You will hear that difference quickly.

You can rip your CDs for that bitrate, and the iPod will play it just like that. Sometimes, however, ripping a CD at a higher bitrate won't make a bit of difference, especially with older CDs.


30 posted on 05/07/2005 12:16:24 PM PDT by rdb3 (To the world, you're one person. To one person, you may be the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
It all depends on the file, on my PDA i have CD quality if I want it.

Is that an option on an iPod? Like can you opt out of the data compression in exchange for reduced recording time?

31 posted on 05/07/2005 12:16:28 PM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin

Some people hate to be alone with their own thoughts...not surprising when you think about it.


32 posted on 05/07/2005 12:20:16 PM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: rdb3
I have a subscription to Audible.com. I wish I could download more than just two per month, however.

FYI, Audible is currently offering a 10 books for $120 "gift certificate". There is nothing to keep one from buying the certificate and then giving the certificate to himself. I've done that in the past.

33 posted on 05/07/2005 12:26:25 PM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: rdb3
All of mine in my iPod are at 160 or 192Kbps.

But I gather that there's some compression in the storage/playback chain somewhere -- and my impression is that it's always "on" in an iPod. The compression can't be gotten around.

I'm guessing that even though the original file may have been recorded at a higher bit rate, the compressed version that gets stored on the iPod isn't at that high of a bit rate.

But I could be completely wrong on this.

34 posted on 05/07/2005 12:26:48 PM PDT by Yardstick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: LibKill

You are preaching to the Choir.

I actually find the Pocket PC system is pretty simple I just like being able to carry more with me. Now if only they would make them super smaller into wrist size and then with an expanding or holographic screen.


35 posted on 05/07/2005 12:32:13 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick

sorry, I don't know.


36 posted on 05/07/2005 12:32:52 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: durasell

"Some people hate to be alone with their own thoughts...not surprising when you think about it."

Never looked at it that way...but it sure explains a lot where my teen is concerned. ;)


37 posted on 05/07/2005 12:33:43 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: ambrose; WhyisaTexasgirlinPA

I just bought one for my daughter for her 16th B'day.

It was cheaper than a car. So I love 'em.


38 posted on 05/07/2005 12:35:44 PM PDT by SeeRushToldU_So (Flashback.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: durasell

Keep that in mind when you go to any college campus and about every third person has the white ear buds in.


39 posted on 05/07/2005 12:36:19 PM PDT by Mr. Blonde (You know, Happy Time Harry, just being around you kinda makes me want to die.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Diana in Wisconsin

Your teens are probably listening to iPods so they don't have to interact with you. (no offense meant, but I assume you know what I mean.)


40 posted on 05/07/2005 12:36:46 PM PDT by durasell (Friends are so alarming, My lover's never charming...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick

I have no idea how it works, but Mp3 compression technology apparently gets rid of the parts of the recording that are not detectable to all but the most sensitive of ears.

Let's face it... most music these days is not "pure"... they've all been tinkered with during the recording to CD transfer process... especially older albums, which have been remastered.

I have an old Jazz album that still retains the scratchy recording sound. The only thing "authentic" about the experience is that it replicates the inferior recording technology of the 20s/30s. The person hearing it live back then didn't hear those scratchy noises, and I doubt the artist intended those noises to be present either.


41 posted on 05/07/2005 12:42:28 PM PDT by ambrose (....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

Some questions, I see the iPod folks w/little ear buds.
I use a walkman, have a long bus commute, and am subject to a lot of bus noise. I bought high end earphones (big suckers) to drown out some of the outside noise so I wouldn't go deaf turning up the volume on the walkman.

1. Can I use other earphones w/it? I've never seen anyone w/anything other than the little white earplugs.
2. I listen to a lot of talk radio (hence the FReepername). I don't suppose they make an iPod w/a radio? I haven't seen one, but the young people I know who have iPods don't listen to talkradio, so they wouldn't be looking for this function.

I wear my walkman all the time, but until I can get something small, like a walkman, that has radio, I don't see me switching over to an iPod. I don't even use a portable cd player cause they don't fit in a pocket.


42 posted on 05/07/2005 12:42:28 PM PDT by radiohead (revote in washington state)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: durasell

Yeah. My Dad (Sonny's GrandPa), likes to tease me in front of him that I went into my room when I turned 13, and didn't come out until I left for the Army at 17. Partially true. I DID come out for meals and phone calls. Had there been a slot in my door, meals wouldn't have been a problem, but of course, he never DID allow me to have my own phone; the Cruel Ogre! :)


43 posted on 05/07/2005 12:43:27 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: ambrose

Hmmmm, I wonder if they have pods in their cellars....


44 posted on 05/07/2005 12:43:54 PM PDT by mewzilla
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yardstick
I'm guessing that even though the original file may have been recorded at a higher bit rate, the compressed version that gets stored on the iPod isn't at that high of a bit rate.

When you 'rip' your CDs into computer files (for an iPod owner, typically using iTunes) you have a choice on what format and what bitrate the resulting file will be. The iPod can play all the formats that iTunes can encode.

Looking at iTunes right now, I see that it can encode into:

It's all there in iTunes - just look in the preferences, at the "importing" tab.

I'm a pretty demanding listener, and I use AAC 256 to encode my music - I can't tell the difference between that and a CD. But if you are really a fanatic, go with Apple Lossless - it's exactly like the CD, but saves (by my memory) half the space.

Why don't you give it a try? Just go to the iTunes download page, install it, and try it out on some of your favorite music.

45 posted on 05/07/2005 1:08:22 PM PDT by Yossarian (Remember: NOT ALL HEART ATTACKS HAVE TRADITIONAL SYMPTOMS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: ambrose
I used to have a Walkman but gave it up for three reasons:

People with headphones on in public look like goofs.

No pair of headphones on earth can beat a good set of speakers so, what's the point?  I mean, why engage in something half-a$$ed?

I'm comfortable enough with my own thoughts that I can walk places without distracting myself.

Those reason apply to iPods so I don't own one.

46 posted on 05/07/2005 1:17:05 PM PDT by Psycho_Bunny (I know a great deal about the Middle East because Ive been raising Arabian horses" Patrick Swazey)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cyborg

I live for my iPod. During a trip I took last month, I used it to cover the sound of snoring so I could drop off and fall asleep. :-)


47 posted on 05/07/2005 1:19:28 PM PDT by RikaStrom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: rdb3

Question on the Audible.com - On the two per month downloads - Are they like rentals or they purchases. In other words do you get to keep them?


48 posted on 05/07/2005 1:26:08 PM PDT by sd-joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: cyborg

Can you recommend any good meditation music? Here or private message. Thank you.


49 posted on 05/07/2005 1:35:02 PM PDT by my_pointy_head_is_sharp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: my_pointy_head_is_sharp

Steven Halpern
Deuter's Buddha Nature
Liquid Mind
Visionary Music's DNA series
Carlos Nakai


Those are some of the best ones out there. I never did like Yanni. He's artsy fartsy new age. I like real spacey, granola crunching stuff :-) I also have a yoga series by Beth Shaw that I downloaded off of itunes.


50 posted on 05/07/2005 1:40:19 PM PDT by cyborg (Serving fresh, hot Anti-opus since 18 April 2005)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-146 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson