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To: 2ndreconmarine
There seems to be a significant controversy over whether most resveratrol supplements are worth a darn. The claim of one producer of resveratrol supplement, Longevintex, is that all the other supplements are nearly inactive, due to how easy it is to oxidize resveratrol. That one product uses air tight, nitrogen packed, opaque capsules, and costs about one dollar a cap.

But elsewhere, I saw speculation that the claims of the uselessness of most resveratrol supplements was a ploy by the big pharmaceuticals to reduce the impact that that supplement risked having on their drug sales.

Do a Google search for Longevinex for more details.

As best as I can tell, the jury is still out.

We need some lab or clinical trials on the usefulness of ordinary resveratrol supplements, not lab grade, nitrogen packed stuff.

2,172 posted on 11/28/2005 12:05:54 AM PST by ThePythonicCow (To err is human; to moo is bovine.)
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To: ThePythonicCow
We need some lab or clinical trials on the usefulness of ordinary resveratrol supplements, not lab grade, nitrogen packed stuff

Good luck with that...I'm not sure, after the antioxidant exchange, if you're asking questions or if you have a broad knowledge base on supplements. I don't, as you must have guessed.

My guess is that resveratrol is less useful as a tnf-A or IL inhibitor than other supplements may be. For example, curcumin 95% standardized has been lab shown to have Cox inhibitor-like effects as far as inflammation is concerned, to have anti-inflammatory effects similar to the corticosteroids at some levels, and also to cause emptying of the gall bladder, so that people who have gall stones should probably not take it. Neither should pregnant or nursing women, because the effects at a high level on those populations aren't known. As far as toxicity, large doses apparently can be taken with no ill effects on the rest of the population who are not pregnant and have no gall stones.

But resveratrol, on the other hand, is found in high levels in, say, Pinot Noir wine, (or whatever wine) and rapidly degrades after the bottle is opened. In other words, (as you suggest) so far, it's unstable for practical use.

Let me go a little further and state that nobody here is prescribing. These are well-known substances that have had recent research showing that they MAY be helpful in case of various viral infection. No research has been done on any of them with H5N1 patients, to the best of my knowledge.

Some here have found what seems to possibly be helpful, through their own reading and use. I sincerely doubt that there is going to be a huge research effort anywhere in the world that is going to give us definitive answers on the use of supplements that possibly have antiviral action in an H5N1 pandemic.

What we are looking for is known supplements with antiviral action that are inexpensive and relatively easy to stock up for possible need. I bet very few care about the antioxidant levels, but I could be wrong.

And I DO apologize--I thought you were asking a question about antioxidants, and it's clear I was mistaken.

2,182 posted on 11/28/2005 9:54:52 AM PST by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: ThePythonicCow
The claim of one producer of resveratrol supplement, Longevintex, is that all the other supplements are nearly inactive, due to how easy it is to oxidize resveratrol.

There is a long history of proprietary herbal formulas that claim to render all the competitors obsolete, for one reason or another. I am skeptical and would like to see the results of independent testing as well. I remember in the 80s a friend of mine was selling a vitamin supplement that was "1000% more active" than the others. I don't believe the company is still in business.

2,187 posted on 11/28/2005 6:02:25 PM PST by steve86 (@)
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To: ThePythonicCow
There seems to be a significant controversy over whether most resveratrol supplements are worth a darn.

Perhaps, however the Avian Influenza Bird Flu Information summary and the referenced ProMed articles indicate that Resveratrol in supplement form is more stable:

"Resveratrol supplements are relatively inexpensive, are more stable than wine and is available in liquid form for absorption in the mouth. No toxic effects noted. (Pubmed PMID 1583880, 12817628, 15985724) "

2,201 posted on 11/30/2005 7:02:47 PM PST by 2ndreconmarine (Horse feces (929 citations) vs ID (0 citations) and horse feces wins!!!!!)
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