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Deep Throat and Genocide
The American Spectator ^ | 6-1-05 | Ben Stein

Posted on 06/01/2005 5:55:15 AM PDT by veronica

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To: sitetest
Mr. Nixon, having won the 1968 election in a squeaker, wished to manipulate the 1972 election to assure victory. Internal polling a year or two before the election indicated the only candidate over which he'd have a walk was Sen. George McGovern. Thus, the CREEP (Committee to Re-Elect the President) did what it could to aid the senator and harm his opponents.

"wished to manipulate the 1972 election"? Rather odd choice of words. I disagree with the apparent conclusion you want us to reach concerning CREEP and its impact on the general election and the democratic nomination for President. The idea that CREEP helped influence the selection of McGovern as the Dem nomonee is pure conspiritorial nonsense.

Nixon was reelected overwhelmingly because the public supported his policies. In the ’68 campaign, Nixon favored a “negative income tax,” which became the earned income tax credit and an expansion of the welfare programs begun during the Great Society, creation of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with the Clean Air Act, dramatic increases in social service spending, and interventionist economic policies ranging from dollar devaluation to wage and price controls. During his presidency, many of these proposals became law, particularly those that could be accomplished without Congressional approval.

McGovern’s platform was unapologetically liberal: he campaigned on an immediate end to the Vietnam War, socialized medicine, and a guaranteed national minimum income. The radicalism of the 1972 Democratic platform was caused partly by a sense inside the party that its defeat in 1968 was caused by a failure to articulate adequately the differences between the Democrats’ agenda and that of then-candidate Nixon.

51 posted on 06/01/2005 6:44:34 AM PDT by kabar
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To: bejaykay
"the original argument that Mr. Stein made that all he wanted was peace..."

I think Mr. Stein said that Nixon made peace..not that it was his only goal in life.

It's true that Nixon took us out of Indo China and that he went to great lengths to open doors to China (I was the neighborhood at the time).

If you look as what former presidents DID rather than what's been said of them then Nixon wanted to see peace both foreigh and domestic and Kennedy et al appear less saintly than sinister.

52 posted on 06/01/2005 6:44:35 AM PDT by norton (build a wall and post the rules at the gate)
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To: Piquaboy
Actually the worst thing I can say about Richard Nixon is he was a classic Rockefeller (Liberal) Republican. If he had been a Democrat he would have been a darling of the media. I agree with Stein that things MIGHT have been different if Nixon had remained in office. No Gerald Ford who out Rockerfellered Rockefeller. Maybe no Jimmy Carter. AND maybe no Ronald Reagan. So maybe by sacrificing Richard M. Nixon we were able to at least defeat the Soviet Union.
53 posted on 06/01/2005 6:49:01 AM PDT by Bar-Face
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To: OldFriend

Thanks for succinctly describing the reason for the msm's selective vile venom: "Nixon was a republican".

Oh how they love to hate Richard Nixon!


54 posted on 06/01/2005 6:50:37 AM PDT by YaYa123
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To: YaYa123
Another piece of Watergate trivia. When Nixon ordered Special Prosecuter Archibald Cox fired, the Attorney General Eliot Richardson resigned and the Asst AG William Weld did also.

The 3rd in command who carried out the President's order was Robert Bork. The incident is known as "The Saturday Night Massacre".

55 posted on 06/01/2005 6:55:14 AM PDT by Semper Paratus
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To: bejaykay
Nice Freep name, although I don't recall a Clintoon intern named Kay...
56 posted on 06/01/2005 6:56:21 AM PDT by BlueMondaySkipper (The quickest way of ending a war is to lose it. - George Orwell)
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To: OldFriend
One slight tweak to what you and others have said: his sin was being a successful Republican. The MSM have no problem with loser pubbies.
57 posted on 06/01/2005 6:57:32 AM PDT by Pharmboy ("Rebellion to tyrants is obedience to God")
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To: kabar

I am reading Richard Reeves' book on Nixon as we speak. Nixon didn't really care a whit about domestic policy. Once he told Haldeman that he didn't read everything he signed. He had to be almost literally forced to meet with his domestic policy advisors.


58 posted on 06/01/2005 6:59:34 AM PDT by nonliberal (Graduate: Curtis E. LeMay School of International Relations)
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To: veronica
...started the Environmental Protection Administration. Does anyone remember what he did that was bad?

That in and of itself was bad enough. He created more bureaucracy and not just by adding a few jobs but an entire agency. I could care less about Watergate. All politicians are questionable, no matter what side of the aisle.

59 posted on 06/01/2005 7:04:36 AM PDT by billbears (Deo Vindice)
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To: tkathy
Nixon ended the war that Kennedy utterly stupidly started.

Your sentence brought to mind Kerry's repeated ploy during the presidential primary debates of referring to "Nixon's war". Needless to say, he was never called on this assertion. He who went to Vietnam when LBJ was president.

60 posted on 06/01/2005 7:07:31 AM PDT by cyncooper
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To: veronica; Piquaboy
He lied to protect his subordinates who were covering up a ridiculous burglary that no one to this date has any clue about its purpose.

IMHO, Untrue...It has been suspected, why the break-in occurred, Deans' "then girlfriend" was a "Workin' Girl", her photo(s) were kept in a DNC "VIP Perks" book. The people who "broke-in" did so on the orders of Dean, not Nixons'..they were to retrieved those photos for Dean, not Nixon...and since Nixon was the head of the GOP @ that time. he got the blame.

...of course, if Slick Willie/sHillary and their Ilk had done this, MSM would have given "the Whole Gang" a Pass and then have cheered him for it, when/if it were revealed.

The most terrible thing that he did is be a Republican...and accusing (backed up by Whitaker Chamber's "Pumpkin Papers") Algier Hiss, of being a Soviet Spy.

61 posted on 06/01/2005 7:09:08 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: PzLdr
"He was hounded out of office for two reasons: He had been on the left's hit list since Helen Gahagan Douglas and Hiss, and because the left and their toads in the media could do it."

I think if there had been an Internet and FR in those days your point of view on this subject would be commonplace. It's like some conservatives here think the "MSM left" just started lying and spinning when Al Gore gave us the Internet. The left's spin machine in those days was more like a centrifuge.
62 posted on 06/01/2005 7:10:05 AM PDT by myheroesareDeadandRegistered (Ann Coulter/ Mark Levin tag team in '08)
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To: nonliberal
Nixon didn't really care a whit about domestic policy

What nonsense. As others have noted, for good or ill, Nixon's domestic policies were quite extensive and precedent setting.

63 posted on 06/01/2005 7:15:21 AM PDT by cyncooper
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To: bejaykay
He wasn't framed. He deserved a forced resignation and infamy.

..flame suit on..BULL SH!T..read post #61

64 posted on 06/01/2005 7:16:00 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: marvlus
..his mistake was trying to protect them from being found out.

..So true. :/

65 posted on 06/01/2005 7:18:32 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: FreedomPoster; A Jovial Cad; bejaykay
That's gonna leave a well-deserved mark.

Too bad...he wasn't using an "Cat of nine-tails"

66 posted on 06/01/2005 7:23:09 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: veronica

Thanks for that. Nixon's 'crime' was he exposed Communists. For that no one was forgiven. McCarthy's name is now a smear word because he investigated communists. McCarthy was wrong. He underestimated the number of communists in the government [and elsewhere].


67 posted on 06/01/2005 7:24:19 AM PDT by ex-snook (Exporting jobs and the money to buy America is lose-lose.)
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To: kabar

Dear kabar,

Once upon a time, I knew all this stuff by memory. I was a teenager when all this occurred, and I absorbed it all like a sponge. I stayed home from school, feigning illness, to watch the Senate Select Committee hearings, and later, I watched the House Judiciary Committee impeachement hearings. However, the passage of time has dimmed (my) memory (at least). I'd have to go research what I once knew by heart.

But I remember a few salient details. I remember that the plumbers started out after Mr. Nixon felt that the ordinary channels for finding leakers had failed. I remember that Mr. Nixon's folks ran a poll prior to the opening of the 1972 presidential election season which showed rather competitive races against most of the possible Democrat nominees.

I won't tell you that Mr. Nixon's folks successfully got Sen. McGovern nominated. I'm not sure the dirty tricks really had that much effect. That isn't to say the attempt wasn't made.

I also don't think that Mr. Nixon's minions did anything different than previous presidents.

But some of the stuff that occurred under his auspices, including third-rate burglaries, and some of the stuff that he countenanced, including the cover-up of third-rate burglaries, were felonies.

And Republicans don't think that presidents should be felons.

Remember, as well, when wage and price controls went on, there was a reason for that. A year and a half or so out from the election, the November landslide didn't look so certain.


sitetest


68 posted on 06/01/2005 7:24:24 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
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To: veronica

The "everybody does it" defense is something Stein wouldn't accept from a 12 year old.


69 posted on 06/01/2005 7:24:36 AM PDT by Wolfie
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To: enraged

Try http://releases.usnewswire.com/GetRelease.asp?id=26038 It is an article that has to do with Bob Weiner.


70 posted on 06/01/2005 7:30:12 AM PDT by Safetgiver (Only two requisites to be a judge. Gray hair to look wise and hemmorhoids to look concerned.)
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To: rebapiper
One more thing needs to be said..HE WON'T FEEL THE PAIN ON EARTH BUT HE COULD BURN IN HELL FOR ETERNITY.

HA! LOL! Good double pump! :D

71 posted on 06/01/2005 7:32:00 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: Piquaboy

I still regard Nixon's demise as a coup d'etat engineered by the press. The whole thing was started by the Pentagon Papers and Nixon's efforts to stem the illegal leaking of classified information to a press determined to undermine the Vietnam War.


72 posted on 06/01/2005 7:34:47 AM PDT by Steve_Seattle
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To: Frumious Bandersnatch
..he himself indicated that understood that coverups cause problems...going to bat and showing loyalty for underlings who basically betrayed him....So True.
73 posted on 06/01/2005 7:35:31 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: veronica
Well now the Left (and the Press) now have a name and face to put with their 'hero', Deep Throat. Do you think they realize that if they had been active in the social movements of the '60's, that they so cherish today, that they would have been very high among Mark Felt's investigative targets? Nah! Mark Felt could very easily have been John Kerry's jailer. The Press should keep that in mind while they are feting this guy as a great American hero.

I guess being a key instrument in Nixon's downfall is enough to exonerate a person for all past sins.

74 posted on 06/01/2005 7:36:22 AM PDT by Tallguy
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To: YaYa123
Think of how the media worked to destroy Dan Quayle. Imagine the thousands of articles about the word potato and his accurate comments about Murphy Brown.

I see that Dana Milbank is having a hissy fit because President Bush used the word 'hop' yesterday. He said he would take two more questions and then had to 'hop'.

Definitely a high crime and misdemeanor, yes?

75 posted on 06/01/2005 7:36:40 AM PDT by OldFriend (MAJOR TAMMY DUCKWORTH.....INSPIRATIONAL)
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To: billbears

Yikes, remembering wage and price controls.......


76 posted on 06/01/2005 7:37:33 AM PDT by OldFriend (MAJOR TAMMY DUCKWORTH.....INSPIRATIONAL)
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To: bejaykay
And would Nixon have prevented the killing fields? I tend to doubt it.

Neither the South Vietnamese or the Cambodian government would not have fallen if not for Watergate. The Soviets, looking for "Detant" would have backed off their assistance to the North Vietnamese, the radical congressional class of 1974 would have not been elected, and 3 million people in Southeast Asia would not have been butchered.

That is the real legacy of Watergate.

You can even take it a step further. If the US had not decayed both militarily and diplomatically under Ford/Carter (nether would have ever been in the WH had Nixon survived) would the Soviets have invaded Afghanistan, and without that, would we be fighting in the Mideast today? The latter is of course speculation, but not at all unreasonable.

77 posted on 06/01/2005 7:38:18 AM PDT by Ditto ( No trees were killed in sending this message, but billions of electrons were inconvenienced.)
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To: tkathy
JFK sent 14,000 ground troops to vietnam with no strategy whatsoever.

...and the Kennedy mafia will in turn blame the initial military commitment on Eisenhower -- as if a small military 'mission' is the same as putting combat advisers into the field. Sheesh.

78 posted on 06/01/2005 7:38:49 AM PDT by Tallguy
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To: billbears; veronica
Yup. I love ya Ben, but I have to disagree with you on the EPA.

Kind of sad that two of this country's worst regulatory behemoths -- the EPA and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- were brought to us by Republican administrations.

79 posted on 06/01/2005 7:39:01 AM PDT by Constitutionalist Conservative (Have you visited http://c-pol.blogspot.com?)
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To: rebapiper
Her heinous worked to deny Richard Nixon the right to have an attorney.

Hoping to live long enough to see her reap what she sowed.

80 posted on 06/01/2005 7:40:05 AM PDT by OldFriend (MAJOR TAMMY DUCKWORTH.....INSPIRATIONAL)
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To: Tallguy
"JFK sent 14,000 ground troops to vietnam with no strategy whatsoever."

Hey, Kennedy would have withdrawn from Vietnam and we would have had everlasting peace if Lyndon Johnson and the military-industrial complex hadn't had Kennedy assassinated so they could expand the war. I know this is true because I saw it in the movie "JFK". (sarcasm)
81 posted on 06/01/2005 7:42:19 AM PDT by Steve_Seattle
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To: BlueMondaySkipper; bejaykay
Nice Freep name, although I don't recall a Clintoon intern named Kay...

Your Right...It (that name) really does suck, Loudy. :D

82 posted on 06/01/2005 7:43:31 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: veronica
Ben Stein is right, up to a point. I part company though as to Nixon's judgment and character.

In high school in 1968 and college in 1972 and from an ardently conservative and Republican family, I nevertheless had no illusions about Nixon's competence, talents, and policies. I campaigned hard for his reelection in 1972 but was not a loyalist. Early in the Watergate scandal, I became convinced that Nixon was deeply involved in the cover-up and that the episode would have tragic consequences.

Nixon's first and greatest mistake was not hammering North Viet Nam into utter submission within a month of coming into office in 1969. The country half expected that and would have supported him. The Russians and the Chinese would have been furious but would have stood back and let it happen.

By waiting until 1973 to bomb and blockade North Viet Nam, Nixon let costs, casualties, war weariness, and domestic antiwar agitation mount to the point that they decisively weakened support for the war. Yes, Watergate prompted the loss of South Viet Nam, but had we fully won the war in 1969, that would not have happened; and Watergate might not have happened either because victory in Viet Nam would have made Nixon a shoo-in for reelection and made desperate reelection tactics superfluous.

Nixon's greatest failing was, obviously, character -- but not as most people think. Nixon was admirable in many ways, but especially so in rising from a poverty stricken youth through intelligence,courage, and hard work. The experience marked him though with a moody, high strung nature that felt reverses and slights too keenly, gave him a craving for the approval of elite opinion, and inspired excessive, self-defeating, self-deluding efforts at control over detail.

A brilliant political tactician, Nixon often seemed clueless as to larger strategic considerations. Disciplined in his political ascent, as President, he lapsed into the foolish self-indulgence of bitterness and recriminations in the presence of aides of slavish loyalty but weak judgment and integrity. In retrospect, Nixon seems of a type the corporate world often sees: the brilliant, standout executive who falters as Chairman and CEO.
83 posted on 06/01/2005 7:44:07 AM PDT by Rockingham
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To: veronica

Stein cuts through the BS.

Here's Nixon's bio (http://www.presidentialpetmuseum.com/presidents/37RN.htm):



Richard Milhous Nixon
Served 1969-1973, 1973-1974 (resigned)

Richard Milhous Nixon was born in Yorba Linda, California, January 9, 1913.

Nixon had a brilliant record at Whittier College and Duke University Law School before beginning the practice of law. In 1940, he married Patricia Ryan; they had two daughters, Patricia (Tricia) and Julie. During World War II, Nixon served as a Navy lieutenant commander in the Pacific.

On leaving the service, he was elected to Congress from his California district. In 1950, he won a Senate seat. Two years later, in 1952, General Eisenhower selected Nixon, age 39, to be his running mate. Nixon's career nearly took a setback when he was accused of accepting improper gifts. In a nationally-televised speech, Vice Presidential candidate Nixon told the nation he had given back all gifts but one -- a cocker spaniel puppy named Checkers -- whom his daughter loved. Watching the "Checkers Speech," General Eisenhower decided to keep Nixon on the ticket, saying "That's my man."

As Vice President, Nixon took on major duties in the Eisenhower Administration. Nominated for President by acclamation in 1960, he lost by a narrow margin to John F. Kennedy. In 1968, he again won his party's nomination, and went on to defeat Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey and third-party candidate George C. Wallace.

His election in 1968 had climaxed a career unusual on two counts: his early success and his comeback after being defeated for President in 1960 and for Governor of California in 1962.

Once in the White House, the Nixons shared their private lives with three dogs, an Irish setter named King Timahoe, a poodle named Vicky, and a silky terrier named Pasha.

Reconciliation was the first goal set by Nixon. The nation was painfully divided, with turbulence in the cities and war overseas. During his Presidency, Nixon succeeded in ending American fighting in Viet Nam and improving relations with the U.S.S.R. and China. But the Watergate scandal brought fresh divisions to the country and ultimately led to his resignation.

Nixon's accomplishments while in office included revenue sharing, ending the draft, new anticrime laws, and a broad environmental program. As he had promised, he appointed conservative Supreme Court justices William Rehnquist and Harry Blackmun. One of the most dramatic events of his first term occurred in 1969, when American astronauts made the first moon landing.

Some of his most acclaimed achievements came in his quest for world stability. During visits in 1972 to Beijing and Moscow, he reduced tensions with China and the U.S.S.R. His summit meetings with Russian leader Leonid I. Brezhnev produced a treaty to limit strategic nuclear weapons. In January 1973, he announced an accord with North Viet Nam to end American involvement in Indochina. In 1974, his Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger, negotiated disengagement agreements between Israel and its opponents, Egypt and Syria.

In his 1972 bid for office, Nixon defeated Democratic candidate George McGovern by one of the widest margins on record.

Within a few months, his administration was embattled over the so-called "Watergate" scandal, stemming from a break-in at the offices of the Democratic National Committee during the 1972 campaign. The break-in was traced to officials of the Committee to Re-elect the President. A number of administration officials resigned; some were later convicted of offenses connected with efforts to cover up the affair. Nixon denied any personal involvement, but the courts forced him to yield tape recordings which indicated that he had, in fact, tried to divert the investigation.

As a result of unrelated scandals in Maryland, Vice President Spiro T. Agnew resigned in 1973. Nixon nominated, and Congress approved, House Minority Leader Gerald R. Ford as Vice President.

Faced with what seemed almost certain impeachment, Nixon announced on August 8, 1974, that he would resign the next day to begin "that process of healing which is so desperately needed in America."

In his last years, Nixon gained praise as an elder statesman. By the time of his death on April 22, 1994, he had written numerous books on his experiences in public life and on foreign policy.


84 posted on 06/01/2005 7:44:30 AM PDT by OESY
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To: veronica

Felt is a FINK!


85 posted on 06/01/2005 7:45:42 AM PDT by Kokojmudd (Today's Liberal is Tomorrow's Prospective Flying Saucer Abductee)
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To: kabar
Nixon was responsible for the implosion of Edmund Muskie's campaign? I guess that's what they are saying. I don't see how any of the activities of CREEP can be charactarized as having done THAT.

Maybe Nixon's paranoia centered around a possible run by Teddy Kennedy. But it seems to me that Teddy, at the time, was simply the idiot brother of JFK & RFK. A political lightweight (kinda like his nephew, Patrick, is right now). He was certainly not the "Lion of the Senate" as the Left currently portrays him. OTOH, Nixon did have a fear of the Kennedy political machine, so I guess it's plausible.

86 posted on 06/01/2005 7:47:05 AM PDT by Tallguy
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To: Frumious Bandersnatch
I guess that his big problem was going to bat and showing loyalty for underlings who basically betrayed him.

As opposed to WJC, who used underlings like Kleenex.
87 posted on 06/01/2005 7:48:52 AM PDT by beezdotcom (I'm usually either right or wrong...)
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To: Steve_Seattle
I know this is true because I saw it in the movie "JFK". (sarcasm)

Only in the drug-induced dreams of Oliver Stone. Ha ha!

88 posted on 06/01/2005 7:48:56 AM PDT by Tallguy
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To: Kokojmudd
Felt is a FINK! ...Far worse.
89 posted on 06/01/2005 7:50:51 AM PDT by skinkinthegrass (Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you :^)
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To: Rockingham
A brilliant political tactician, Nixon often seemed clueless as to larger strategic considerations.

There you have it in a nutshell. Exempting foreign-policy, where Nixon was indeed the master-strategist, your statement is absolutely correct.

90 posted on 06/01/2005 7:52:16 AM PDT by Tallguy
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To: bejaykay

OK, I give up. How was Ben stretching it? His article seemed restrained to me and I was not a Nixon cheer leader. As for wanting power, Nixon had the power of the presidency. What more could he possibly want? By the way, were you around during the Nixon era?


91 posted on 06/01/2005 7:58:12 AM PDT by Paulus Invictus
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To: Uhhuh35

Uh, the author of the piece is aware of that late-breaking info and even references it - reading is a skill....


92 posted on 06/01/2005 8:04:22 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: veronica
It is amazing that the MSM is defending this joker. All Felt had to do was spill the beans in the GRAND JURY and he would have done his duty. It may not have had the IMPACT of a Deep Throat and it may have taken Articles of Impeachment to be passed on the floor of the House but IT WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LEGAL thing to do.

Does anyone remember a certain someone whose entire life was ruined because SHE DID THE RIGHT THING and spilled the beans when proded by a friend to commit a felony to protect criminal PRESIDENT?

93 posted on 06/01/2005 8:05:34 AM PDT by PISANO (We will not tire......We will not falter.......We will NOT FAIL!!! .........GW Bush [Oct 2001])
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To: veronica

bump


94 posted on 06/01/2005 8:06:44 AM PDT by prognostigaator
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To: Paulus Invictus
His article seemed restrained to me and I was not a Nixon cheer leader. As for wanting power, Nixon had the power of the presidency. What more could he possibly want?

Oh, I don't know, perhaps Nixon wanted the FBI to actually follow orders?

J. Edgar had his own little fiefdom over there, blackmailing Presidents to keep his position. It strikes me that W. Mark Felt, aka "Deep Throat", would have kept the status-quo over at FBI. Meaning he would have maintained J.Edgars 'secret files' on senior government officials. The FBI would have remained a rogue agency of the federal government under his leadership. Dishing the dirt on Nixon while obstructing his boss, L. Patrick Grey, was Felt's way of 'giving the finger' to the new state of affairs at the Bureau. It strikes me that he was a small man.

Bill Clinton actually accomplished far more in the way he politicized the FBI, but we won't be hearing about that in the MSM. Nope, not a peep.

95 posted on 06/01/2005 8:07:54 AM PDT by Tallguy
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To: Uhhuh35

They broke into watergate on a tip that the DNC was bought out by Moscow.


96 posted on 06/01/2005 8:10:42 AM PDT by Dead Dog
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To: sitetest
Once upon a time, I knew all this stuff by memory. I was a teenager when all this occurred, and I absorbed it all like a sponge. I stayed home from school, feigning illness, to watch the Senate Select Committee hearings, and later, I watched the House Judiciary Committee impeachement hearings. However, the passage of time has dimmed (my) memory (at least). I'd have to go research what I once knew by heart.

I wasn't a teenager at the time. I was an adult who had served in Vietnam and had just joined the Foreign Service and was in Washington at the time of the Watergate hearings. What was happening had some immediate relevancy to me. Thus, it remains fairly clear in my memory.

>But I remember a few salient details. I remember that the plumbers started out after Mr. Nixon felt that the ordinary channels for finding leakers had failed. I remember that Mr. Nixon's folks ran a poll prior to the opening of the 1972 presidential election season which showed rather competitive races against most of the possible Democrat nominees.

Every politician and his followers worry about reelection and develop an election strategy to win. I am sure the Dem candidates did the same thing. What potential Democrat candidates, other than McGovern are you talking about? At the Dem 1972 convention, McGovern received 1,865 votes, compared to his nearest rivals Henry Jackson (525), George Wallace (382), and Shirly Chisholm (152). I don't buy the premise that Nixon's reelection committee helped handpick the Dem nominee or had any influence in doing so. The Dems had lost touch with the American people through their excessive liberalism.

Nixon won in 1968 because of George Wallace's formation of a third party, which split the Sourthern Dems. Wallace won 46 electoral votes in 1968.

But some of the stuff that occurred under his auspices, including third-rate burglaries, and some of the stuff that he countenanced, including the cover-up of third-rate burglaries, were felonies. And Republicans don't think that presidents should be felons.

Nixon's crime was the cover-up. At the suggestion of LBJ, Nixon set up a taping system similar to LBJ. That was his downfall, e.g, releasing the tapes. If you think that Nixon and his reelection committee originated political dirty tricks, you are sadly mistaken. Even Kerry's brother was guilty of breaking into an opponent's political headquarters. Kennedy and Richard Daley helped steal the 1960 election, which Nixon did not challenge out of respect for the Presidency. What other stuff are you talking about?

Felt was also a felon. He condoned the secret break-in of private homes of the Weatherman Underground by government agents without a search warrant. Reagan pardoned him.

And Republicans don't think that presidents should be felons.

Richard Nixon was not a convicted felon.

97 posted on 06/01/2005 8:14:16 AM PDT by kabar
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Comment #98 Removed by Moderator

To: kabar

Dear kabar,

Sen. McGovern was not the odds-on favorite at the beginning of the 1972 election season to win the Democrat presidential nomination. I believe that Sen. Muskie was a favorite, if not the favorite. Tears (or snowflakes) in response to forged letters seemed to have had an effect on Mr. Muskie's candidacy.

"I don't buy the premise that Nixon's reelection committee helped handpick the Dem nominee or had any influence in doing so."

I didn't say they did. I DID say they tried to have influence in that process. I'm skeptical whether they succeeded.

"Nixon won in 1968 because of George Wallace's formation of a third party, which split the Sourthern Dems. Wallace won 46 electoral votes in 1968."

Some at FR have argued that Mr. Wallace nearly cost Mr. Nixon the election, that Mr. Wallace hurt Mr. Nixon more than Mr. Humphrey.

"If you think that Nixon and his reelection committee originated political dirty tricks, you are sadly mistaken."

Did you take the time to read my posts? Let me quote myself from my last post:

"I also don't think that Mr. Nixon's minions did anything different than previous presidents."

* * *

"Felt was also a felon."

True, but irrelevant. Mr. Felt was a scumbag. That doesn't precisely exonerate Mr. Nixon.

"Richard Nixon was not a convicted felon."

True, but neither is Mr. Clinton. Yet, it doesn't prevent us from recognizing the truth that he (and Mr. Nixon) committed felonies. In the case of Mr. Nixon, the Republican leadership told him he'd have to go. In the case of Mr. Clinton, the Dammocrap leadership defended him till their dying breath.


sitetest


99 posted on 06/01/2005 8:30:57 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
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To: Tallguy
See my post #97. Jackson was the only viable candidate, but he was too conservative for the Dem party. Muskie received 24 votes at the 1972 convention, Humphrey 67, and Terry Sanford, North Carolina Gov, 78.

Nixon was extricating us from Vietnam. By the end of March 1972, we had 95,500 troops in Vietnam, and by August 1972 about 27,000, which declined to about 16,000 by the end of November. Nixon had effectively defused the Dems' main issue.

Maybe Nixon's paranoia centered around a possible run by Teddy Kennedy. But it seems to me that Teddy, at the time, was simply the idiot brother of JFK & RFK. A political lightweight (kinda like his nephew, Patrick, is right now). He was certainly not the "Lion of the Senate" as the Left currently portrays him. OTOH, Nixon did have a fear of the Kennedy political machine, so I guess it's plausible.

In 1972 Ted Kennedy was not even in the running for the Presidency. He had been in the Senate for 10 years and had no interest in running for President after having his two brothers assassinated. He was just 40 years old.

After his experience in 1960 and the grief he took from the Left about Hiss, Nixon had good reason to be paranoid. Even paranoids have enemies.

100 posted on 06/01/2005 8:41:27 AM PDT by kabar
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