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Storm Warning to the Art World: Everything is going to Change! (Great Read -'bout time!)
Plenair magazine (Reprint via the Art Renewal Center) ^ | FR Post June 2005 | Paul Solderberg

Posted on 06/08/2005 7:11:02 PM PDT by vannrox

IN 1913, THE ARRIVAL IN AMERICA of a simple idea drastically revolutionized the Art World. The occasion was the Armory Show in New York, the first exhibition of Modern Art in this country, and the simple idea was this: The proper role of the artist is to express himself.

That was utterly new. It turned all the preceding centuries of Art History on their head.

Fast-forward to the end of the same century: that same simple idea, that the proper role of the artist is to express himself or herself, was being taught as gospel in virtually every college and university in America, as well as in the art departments of essentially every high school, middle school and elementary school across the country. All major art publications accepted that idea as an unassailable given, as did virtually all art critics and art writers. And virtually every city council with a public art program anywhere in America supported that same idea, using tax money for the purchase of public artworks that were, almost always, examples of the artist expressing himself. By Y2K, in other words, that new, revolutionary idea had become entrenched and established-something that everyone had repeated for so long that nobody even questioned it anymore.

Meanwhile, Modern Art1 set about claiming the Art World for itself. Any artist who refused to believe that idea was simply excluded from galleries and not shown; any art reviewer who refused to voice the new truth was fired; and vast collections of art that predated 1913 were sold off or hidden away in basements and closets, having been rendered quaint and obsolete by the new idea's artworks. And in the spotlights of places like Sotheby's and Christie's, Modern works began to sell for millions of dollars each, thereby establishing the godhood of the best proponents of that simple idea, including Picasso, Rothko, Pollock, Kline and Lichtenstein.

Thus nobody thought it particularly unusual, much less bizarre, when a dead (stuffed) horse dangled from the ceiling fetched more than $2 million at a Sotheby's auction in New York in 2004, or when an anonymous buyer paid $5.2 million for a porcelain statue of Michael Jackson cuddling a chimpanzee named Bubbles, or when Steven Cohen, founder of a Connecticut-based hedge fund called SAC Capital Advisors, LLC, spent $8 million for an adult tiger shark pickled in formaldehyde.2

Such mega-sales stand as the ultimate proof that, during the 20th Century, that simple 1913 idea effectively took over the Art World in America (as it concurrently did in the rest of the world).

And what's wrong with that idea?

There are three things wrong with it.

The first is that when you have the mindset that anything an artist does is art, credentials replace talent. Like this:

MODERN ART ADVOCATE: "Artist Joe Schmo is a great artist!"

IMPARTIAL HONEST INQUIRER: "Cool. Can he paint?"

MAA: "He attended the Haystack Mountain School of Art on Deer Isle, Maine, from 1980 to 1981."

IHI: "Oh. Can he paint?"

MAA: "He received a BA in Art from Yale University in 1986!"

IHI: "Can he paint?"

MAA: "He completed his post-graduate studies at the Stowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture."

IHI: "Can he paint?"

MAA: "He studied with Mauirizo Cattalan!"

IHI: "Can he paint?"

MAA: "He's had dozens of solo and group shows in New York City and his works are in corporate and private collections all over the world."

IHI: "Can he paint?"

MAA: "What kind of a question is that? Boy, you sure don't understand the Art World."

IHI: "Guess not."

The second thing wrong with the 1913 idea is that when all the focus is on the artist, his or her choice of subjects is finite. If your focus is, instead, the beauty and power of the natural world, then your subjects are infinite; but if your focus is yourself, then there really isn't a whole lot to say. To coin a phrase, the world is much bigger than any one artist.

Which is why so much of Modern Art is "derivative," rephrasing, reiterating, appropriating, and outright copying, all to spackle over the big whole where originality should be. For example, Frederic Church (1826-1900) painted landscapes that portrayed the majesty and grandeur of nature in places like Niagara Falls. Frank Moore, a Modern Artist, paints pictures like Niagara (1994), which was a direct copy of a Frederic Church painting that Moore framed with copper tubing and a faucet. This was to convey the fragility of the planet's water supply. "It's terrifying and awful when you realize that billions of tons of pollutants are flowing down the Niagara River every day," Moore said.



Originality v. appropriation, infinite v. finite, painting the glories of America to inspire love and wonder v. constructing paintings to scare people into environmental awareness: that's the second thing wrong with the 1913 idea.

But the third and by far worst thing wrong with that idea is that it trivialized the public clear out of the Art World. That idea turned the spotlight squarely on the artists, leaving the public in the dark. As the artist became all-important, the public became unimportant, even irrelevant.

In years to come, that single fact - the exclusion of the public - will be shown to have been far more profoundly important than the new role of the artist. It is therefore worth explaining and emphasizing: for all the centuries before 1913, the single idea that governed the Art World was that the proper role of the artist was to express art. Not himself. Something far bigger and much grander: art. And in all those centuries, the role of the public was to view and admire artworks so as to be inspired and uplifted.

The 1913 idea totally changed that. Thenceforth, the public was irrelevant except as a source of tax dollars and as a target-the goal was not to uplift and inspire but to offend and incense. The mindset was this: "I am an artist, and therefore if you do not like what I create then you are anti-art and stupid and therefore desperately in need of the art I shall give you which you then obviously must pay for."

A classic example of that mindset at work occurred in Australia in 1997, when the National Gallery of Victoria opened an exhibition of works by Andres Serrano. One was Piss Christ, a photograph of a crucified Christ submerged in a jar of the artist's urine. After immediate violent public reaction, the museum director, Timothy Potts, closed the show, for which he was then promptly attacked by the artist: "As far as I'm concerned, Dr. Potts has no future, and anyone who agrees with him is a fool," said Serrano.

The ideas at play couldn't be clearer. The public's idea: This art is offensive. The artist's idea: The public needs to be offended so as to be paddle-jolted from their complacency and ignorance into enlightenment. The director's idea: The public's feelings should be considered. The artist's idea: That director needs to be fired, since he clearly doesn't understand that what counts is not what the public feels but what I, the artist, want the public to feel.

It is highly instructive to watch what happens when a Modern artist is attacked: he or she smirks and labels his or her attackers as uninformed fools. But then watch what happens when their access to tax dollars is cut off: they go ballistic. Their reaction is shock and outrage, as if someone has stolen their birthright, if the public refuses to support them.

In 1998 Karen Finley went ballistic - that is, she sued the National Endowment for the Arts, which had had the audacity to turn down her grant request. Finley's "artworks" consisted of anger, nudity, profanity and chocolate-smearing her nude body with chocolate while screaming obscenities at an audience. Despite the art critics who had praised these "performance works" as "a provocative brand of artistry," the NEA turned down her application for more tax dollars. So, joined by three other "controversial artists,"3 she sued, challenging the NEA's "decency and respect" law as violating her right to Free Speech and accusing the NEA of Communist-style repression: "That's what they do in China," she said.4

Finley and everyone else who unquestioningly accepts the 1913 idea about the proper role of the artist all say this very clearly: artists must have the right to do anything they want, and to deny them that right is censorship. In other words, what the public wants is insignificant and unimportant compared to what the artist wants - and if the public tries to cut off the tax-money supply, then the artist must sue, becoming a valiant freedom-fighter struggling to protect the First Amendment from the American public.

And so the last bastion of offensiveness in America today is the Art Establishment, meaning those individuals and institutions who support or have been built upon that 1913 idea.

The rest of us hope and strive always to avoid offending people, and displays of extreme offensiveness, like hate crimes and racial discrimination, are vigorously prosecuted. But artists who offend people - by, for example, pasting elephant dung on a painting of the Madonna, or by hanging statutes of lynched children from the branches of real trees in town squares, or by painting pictures of young girls, their dresses raised, being probed by octopus tentacles5 - are praised by the Art Establishment for their originality, their vision, their genius.

JOHN CURRIN IS A PAINTER whose works hang in such venues as the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego. After his depictions of women sparked outrage among more than a few women viewers several years ago, he said: "When I paint a breast or a woman's body, it's almost a joke to be formal about it, because half of me is the kid in school still drawing on the bathroom wall. . . . But I don't think my works are offensive. If it is offensive, my reaction is kind of, well, whatever."

Art Establishment advocate Gavin Brown was more blunt about Modern Art's harmlessness: "Paintings aren't offensive. They don't kill people." The depressing thing is to think about how many highly intelligent people wouldn't immediately see how bizarre that statement is. Spray-painting swastikas on synagogue walls doesn't kill people either.

But the Modern mindset, in which the public exists only to serve artists by funding them and taking their punches, is that it's all just a game anyway, no harm done. As one of the most-praised Modern artists of the 20th Century, Francis Bacon, confessed: "Painting has become, all art has become, a game by which man distracts himself. And you may say that it has always been like that, but now it's entirely a game." And the Art Establishment's strategy for this game is first to offend us, then to pretend to be incensed that we're offended, smirking at our discomfort, but ready always to fly into a rage if we cheat at the game by trying to withhold our tax money from their pockets.

And that is the state of affairs in America today after nearly a century of the mindset formed by that simple idea as it hardened from new and revolutionary to old and entrenched.

But these are the end days of that mindset. The Art Establishment's days are numbered. As surely as a simple idea changed everything in 1913, so a new simple idea will change everything again. In Nicholas Nickleby Charles Dickens wrote that, "There are only two styles of portrait - painting, the serious and the smirk." Before 1913, artists were serious; since 1913, artists have been smirking.

But the Age of the Smirk is already ending.

The handwriting is on the wall, and it's the same text as in the Book of Daniel in the Bible (which is where the expression "handwriting on the wall" comes from): "Mene Mene Tekel Upharsin," meaning "Your kingdom has been judged as wanting and your days are numbered."

The engine of this new titanic change is not anything so grand as the hand of God; it is instead, again, a simple idea. This new simple idea that will soon rupture the Art World as we know it today is that the proper role of the artist is to express art, and that the public should be treated with the respect they deserve as the legitimate beneficiaries of art.

Sounds familiar. Of course, it is. Just as the 1400s saw a rebirth, or renaissance of respect for the glories of the past (Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome), so we are again, at this moment-not just in America but worldwide-on the threshold of a new renaissance of respect for artworks from artists who don't view themselves as little gods or rock stars.

In 2001, English artist Jacqueline Crofton was banned for life from the Tate Galleries after she threw two eggs at an artwork in the Tate. The work, by Martin Creed, was an empty room in which the lights went on and off, and it was titled The Lights Going On and Off. Crofton egged the room at a moment when the lights were off. Later she told the BBC, "I have nothing against Creed. . . . What I object to fiercely is that we've got this cartel who control the top echelons of the Art World in this country and leave no access for painters and sculptors with real creative talent."

But that cartel's days, again, are numbered. As long as public outrage was being confined to individuals like Crofton throwing eggs, or like another English artist, Ray Hutchins, who dumped a load of manure in front of the Tate and propped up a sign reading "Modern Art is a Load of Bullshit" - as long as the outrage was confined to individual acts by offended people, it could all be laughed off by the Art Establishment with knowing winks and elitist elbow-nudges for blithe reminders that what else can one expect from such a sadly unenlightened public.

But two things have now happened that cannot be laughed off. These are the two things that foretell the end of the Art Establishment, the final total rejection of that 1913 idea, and the triumph of the new simple idea. If you imagine the massive edifice of Modern Art and all its manifestations as vast herds of dinosaurs, then these two things are the great world-killing comet that is speeding toward them to cause their extinction.

The first of the two is the Art Renewal Center, founded in 1998 by Fred Ross of New Jersey, and the second is PleinAir Magazine, launched in 2004 by Eric Rhoads of California. Both the ARC and PAM are world-destroying threats to the Art Establishment's status quo that cannot be laughed off. And they cannot be laughed off, much less ignored, for this one singular reason: they are both the voice of the public, of all the millions of decency-appreciating art-loving men and women who have been pissed off for a very long time now.

One woman throwing eggs? That's a meaningless minnow of protest for the Art Establishment to scare away; but these two, ARC and PAM, jointly representing millions of people, are more like those prehistoric sharks that swallowed whales for appetizers.

One of those millions, art-lover Jim Kalb, posted this comment online in 2004: "Are you finally sick and tired of feeling you have to pretend to like modernist 'art' which you actually think is lousy/laughable at best, outright garbage at worst? If so, check out the ARC site." More than 5 million people are now doing exactly that every year - checking out www.artrenewal.com - and that number is growing exponentially as the word spreads around the globe that if you find Modern/Contemporary art offensive, you're far from alone, and you'll soon be vindicated.

Fred Ross himself in turn welcomed the magazine: "PleinAir Magazine is fast becoming a major addition to the 21st-Century Art World, joining the Art Renewal Center in its call for a return to standards and training in the pursuit of excellence, truth and beauty."

Plein air is French for "fresh air," and plein-air artists are those who paint outdoors rather than in studios. And while the magazine proudly presents the finest in outdoors painting (which happens to be the fastest-growing and most avidly collected form of painting today), the name PleinAir has also come to mean a breath of fresh air in the prevailing Modern Art smog.

Publisher Eric Rhoads makes it very clear what his magazine stands for: "I am not opposed to 'modern' art in any knee-jerk way. I am only opposed - firmly - to any art of any era that is a sham, a ruse, or a mockery, that uses shock value to hide the artist's total lack of talent and the complete lack of any firm artistic foundation. My daughter can bang her hands on a piano, but that doesn't make her a pianist; and the fact that someone can slap paint onto a canvas doesn't make him a fine artist.

"What I do stand for," Rhoads continues, "is appreciating and promoting the art of any era in which the product is an expression of talent coupled with training and discipline. As it happens, one of two places where you can find such artists in great abundance is the past before the 20th Century. We can learn from, and build upon, the classics, the academic masters, the truly great painters in whom prodigious talent was coupled with sound training and great discipline. And the other place where you can find such artists in great abundance is all around us today-real artists creating phenomenal works that the Art Establishment ignores or belittles.

"But that's why, in every issue, we feature both deceased masters and living ones. Our April 2005 issue, for example, had in-depth articles about the Hudson River School, and about Asher B. Durand, who was born the year before George Washington died; and we also had articles about the New Hudson River School and two great modern-day artists, Jane Bloodgood-Abrams of New York and Frank Serrano of California." Rhoads' May issue of PleinAir featured the Fred and Sherry Ross Collection as well as Eugene Boudin, Sydney Laurence as well as living artists Dennis Doheny, Todd Reifers and Quang Ho. Most historical features show a Plein air link to great masters since on-location painting and sketching has been an important part of academic training for centuries because of the need to learn light and color from the source itself.

"That's what PleinAir stands for: not merely outdoor painters but also any and all painters of the past and present who consider art to be a serious, even sacred endeavor, as opposed to an activity to perform with a smirk for hoodwinking the masses."

For the time being, PleinAir is the only art publication anywhere in the world - the only one - whose publisher has the clarity of thought and the courage to tell the truth about the Art Establishment's century-long reign since 1913. For telling it like it is, Rhoads has suffered financially. In retaliation for the magazine's editorializing about the whole Modern Art scam, subscribers have cancelled their subscriptions, and advertisers have withdrawn.

But simultaneously the word is going out that "Eric Rhoads" stands for truth about art in the print media in the same way that "Fred Ross" stands for truth about art online - and the new subscribers climbing aboard are far outnumbering those who jumped ship. When PleinAir first began newsstand sales in 2005, for example, the response was not just far in excess of the national average for new launches, it was in fact unheard-of for any new magazine's newsstand launch: 50% in the United States and 70% in Canada.

As the saying goes, money talks. So watch for more art publications to catch on to the fact that the Art Renewal Center and PleinAir Magazine are perfectly in tune with the vast majority of people on Earth, who for decades have been muttering their discontent but who now, finally, have found as their champions two megaphones of the 21st-Century media, one in cyberspace and the other on newsstands everywhere (or at www.pleinairmagazine.com).

So what does the future hold for the Art World?

Two things for sure.

First, inevitably, the future holds great changes. Those who have spent their lives smirking at the pathetically unenlightened public should maybe take a crash course in Art History, because if there is one constant in Art over the centuries, it is that when things change drastically, they change very quickly. Just like in 1913.

For those who can't be bothered to study Art History, here in a nutshell is the rule that it teaches repeatedly: drastic change comes not in a gradual tide, but in a tsunami.

The second absolute certainty about the future of the Art World is that America and the world will suddenly see a tremendous outpouring of masterful artworks, which in fact are being painted right now. Artists like Andrew Wyeth and Richard Schmid are internationally known for their personification of the new idea that is set to wash away the flimsy world of Modern Art in one titanic cleansing. But there are tens of thousands of highly trained and prodigiously talented artists like them only waiting to be recognized-painters like Will Wilson, for example, and any of the others represented by San Francisco's John Pence Gallery, and the far more numerous younger painters like Chelsea Bentley of Utah, Matt Smith of Arizona, Anthony Waichulis of Pennsylvania, and all the others seen in each issue of PleinAir Magazine.

Count on those two drastic changes happening soon: a new renaissance of respect for art and for the central importance of the public, and a virtual tidal wave of talent producing truly great artworks.

That means, for one thing, that the $8 million dead tiger shark in Connecticut suddenly will be worth less than the formaldehyde it's floating in.

In 2001, there was a symposium at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City. The urgent subject was how curators and conservators could deal with artworks that were deteriorating badly, since these works were created from things like latex, lard, bodily fluids, and banana peels. Word to the Guggenheim: Don't worry about it - in the very near future, all such works will be recognized as refuse belonging in a Dumpster.



TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Editorial; Extended News; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: art; beauty; expression; freedom; funds; government; ignorance; junk; liberal; liberty; money; realism; scams; suckers; trash
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THIS IS A GREAT ARTICLE. IT IS REPRESENTATIVE OF THE FEELINGS OF MANY, MANY PEOPLE WHO ARE ABSOLUTELY SICK AND TIRED OF BEING TOLD THAT JUNK IS ART AND ART IS JUNK AND THAT WE HAVE TO LIKE IT AND APPRECIATE IT. IF WE DON'T THEN WE ARE UNENLIGHTENED AND STUPID.
1 posted on 06/08/2005 7:11:03 PM PDT by vannrox
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To: vannrox

so....on which side does Christo fall ?


2 posted on 06/08/2005 7:13:16 PM PDT by stylin19a ( Social Security...neither social nor secure.)
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To: vannrox

3 posted on 06/08/2005 7:14:20 PM PDT by vannrox (The Preamble to the Bill of Rights - without it, our Bill of Rights is meaningless!)
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To: stylin19a
"...One of those millions, art-lover Jim Kalb, posted this comment online in 2004:

"Are you finally sick and tired of feeling you have to pretend to like modernist 'art' which you actually think is lousy/laughable at best, outright garbage at worst? If so, check out the ARC site." More than 5 million people are now doing exactly that every year - checking out www.artrenewal.ORG - and that number is growing exponentially as the word spreads around the globe that if you find Modern/Contemporary art offensive, you're far from alone, and you'll soon be vindicated...'

4 posted on 06/08/2005 7:17:10 PM PDT by vannrox (The Preamble to the Bill of Rights - without it, our Bill of Rights is meaningless!)
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To: vannrox
"It's terrifying and awful when you realize that billions of tons of pollutants are flowing down the Niagara River every day," Moore said.

Oh yes, that reminds me. It is most noteworthy that not mentioned in the critique is that many, if not most living artists are as dumb as rocks. This MENSA candidate obviously has no clue as to what "billions of tons" is.

I had the good fortune to see the traveling exhibit, Master Paintings of the Hermitage", in the late 70s. Having seen it in the flesh (so to speak), my favorite painting, period, is Evening in the Ukraine, 1878, by Arkhip Ivanovich Kuinji.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I dare any current weenie to jam that much beauty and power into a canvas today.

5 posted on 06/08/2005 7:25:42 PM PDT by Publius6961 (The most abundant things in the universe are ignorance, stupidity and hydrogen)
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To: vannrox
Great posting. The purpose of art is not to allow an artist to express himself or herself. The purpose of art is not to allow an artist to express beauty. The purpose of art is for an artist to communicate beauty. Charlatans can only pretend to, and even if their pretensions are validated by a sycophantic art "community" they are still charlatans.

...another English artist, Ray Hutchins, who dumped a load of manure in front of the Tate and propped up a sign reading "Modern Art is a Load of Bullshit"

There are, of course, exceptions, but in the main the fellow was absolutely right.

6 posted on 06/08/2005 7:27:17 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: vannrox
...Finley's "artworks" consisted of anger, nudity, profanity and chocolate-smearing her nude body with chocolate while screaming obscenities at an audience. Despite the art critics who had praised these "performance works" as "a provocative brand of artistry," the NEA turned down her application for more tax dollars. So, joined by three other "controversial artists,"3 she sued, challenging the NEA's "decency and respect" law as violating her right to Free Speech and accusing the NEA of Communist-style repression: "That's what they do in China," she said.

This is crap, along with other forms of modern art which are more focused on "feelings and intent" instead of passion, skill, aesthetics and beauty. Read the above paragraph then read this to put them in context.

Continue discrediting American culture by degrading all form of artistic expression. "eliminate all good sculpture from parks and buildings," substituting shapeless, awkward and meaningless forms.

Control art critics and directors of art museums. "Our plan is to promote ugliness, repulsive, meaningless art."

Eliminate all laws governing obscenity by calling them "censorship" and a violation of free speech and free press.

Break down cultural standards of morality by promoting pornography and obscenity in books, magazines, motion pictures, radio and television.

These are goals set forth by the communist party and are being pushed, upheld and defended by the ACLU. SOURCE.

7 posted on 06/08/2005 7:29:57 PM PDT by infidel29 ("It is only the warlike power of a civilized people that can give peace to the world."- T. Roosevelt)
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To: vannrox
I am an artist and I am sick of so called art that consists of rubber chickens hanging from dead branches and other such rubbish that I have actually seen in galleries. I will look for this magazine.
8 posted on 06/08/2005 7:33:30 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: Publius6961
I saw that Russian exhibit in Houston I think. Fantastic art, I bought the catalog but I have lost it.
9 posted on 06/08/2005 7:37:59 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: vannrox

Agree 100% - no, I agree 200% - and bump. Did you read an article some time ago about some dead "artist" who had filled a lot of cans with his own excrement, sealed them up, and they were sold for good sums of money to various art museums?


10 posted on 06/08/2005 7:39:03 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Resisting evil is our duty or we are as responsible as those promoting it.)
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To: vannrox
This summed it up for me:

""Publisher Eric Rhoads makes it very clear what his magazine stands for: "I am not opposed to 'modern' art in any knee-jerk way. I am only opposed - firmly - to any art of any era that is a sham, a ruse, or a mockery, that uses shock value to hide the artist's total lack of talent and the complete lack of any firm artistic foundation. My daughter can bang her hands on a piano, but that doesn't make her a pianist; and the fact that someone can slap paint onto a canvas doesn't make him a fine artist.""


Amen.
11 posted on 06/08/2005 7:40:07 PM PDT by baystaterebel (F/8 and be there!)
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To: vannrox
What a great article!
The article itself proves the premise, since if an individual had not posted it here on FR, I might have never heard of it.
Now I plan both to subscribe to the magazine and to join the other site.

I have never had a problem calling crap crap. Even in the Louvre, or at the National Gallery of art, or the Corcoran Gallery in DC, or the Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco.
That makes me an ignorant fool? Water off a duck's back. Has about as much an effect on me as being called "insensitive, hateful homophobe" ---- by neurotic perverts.

Thanks for the post!

12 posted on 06/08/2005 7:44:26 PM PDT by Publius6961 (The most abundant things in the universe are ignorance, stupidity and hydrogen)
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To: Ditter
A few years ago I walked through the Carnegie Museum here in Pittsburgh. I was intrigued by a particular piece entitled "Issue" Below is a copy of it.

The tag next to it read "Issue" by (I don't remember) white latex on aluminum.

13 posted on 06/08/2005 7:50:41 PM PDT by infidel29 ("It is only the warlike power of a civilized people that can give peace to the world."- T. Roosevelt)
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To: Ditter
I saw that Russian exhibit in Houston I think. Fantastic art, I bought the catalog but I have lost it.

I have both the catalog and the bound book of the exhibit that was available at the time.

My ex-wife, who loves books as decoration, "appropriated" it when we divorced. She "appropriated" many of my things in the middle of the night but, when the opportunity presented itself, this book is the only thing that I stole back. Literally. Gives you some idea of how highly I value it.

: )

14 posted on 06/08/2005 7:51:00 PM PDT by Publius6961 (The most abundant things in the universe are ignorance, stupidity and hydrogen)
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To: vannrox

I see from the image name (44368023.Toulmouche_Auguste_La_Fiancee_Hesitante.jpg) the artist and theme of the painting. Do you know if this is the original ratio of the dimemsions of the painting? I ask because so much of the image is taken up by the florid, vacuous wallpaper and if this was meant to be a reflection of the much-less-than-enthusistic bride to be.


15 posted on 06/08/2005 7:55:50 PM PDT by Socratic (Honor the Liberator - He toils for you.)
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To: Publius6961
"It's terrifying and awful when you realize that billions of tons of pollutants are flowing down the Niagara River every day," Moore said.

It's that dihydrogen oxide. It's everywhere. It's in our drinking water and in our toothpaste. It's disposed of in huge quantities by all sorts of industries. Our rivers and lakes are literally AWASH in the stuff.

It's affects on the population are ubiquitous. Intake of dihydrogen oxide can cause bloating and frequent urination. It's even in our food!

Billions of tons of this pollutant flow down the Niagara River and over the falls every single day, and no one does a single constructive thing about it.

I've had it up to HERE with dihydrogen oxide! I think I'll go have a drink.

16 posted on 06/08/2005 7:59:07 PM PDT by John Valentine
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To: Publius6961
The Russian landscape painter Arkhip Ivanovich Kuinji was born in 1842 in the town of Mariupol on the Azov Sea in the South of Russia. Kuinji was of Greek descent – during the reign of Catherine II his ancestors, together with other Greek refugees, settled near the Azov Sea.
            Kuinji lacked a formal education, but his eminent gift helped him attain a notable success in art. He evidently was allowed to attend classes at the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts, had training in the workshop of the famous marine painter Ivan Aivazovsky, visited the classes of the Society of Art Lovers. In 1868, having passed exams in general education and special subjects at the Academy of Arts, Kuinji received a diploma of a freelance artist for his independent work. His earlier paintings Autumn Weather (1870), Lake Ladoga (1870) and On the Valaam Island (1873) brought him first recognition.
            In 1873, Kuinji traveled around Germany, France, Switzerland and Austria and thoroughly studied the works of great masters. On his return, however, he creates works which were absolutely unlike those he had seen in European museums.
            His Ukrainian Night (1876) opened a new romantic stage in his work. He used special light effects to paint nature and achieved such astonishing results, that people, who saw the picture for the first time at an exhibition, tried to check its back, if there was any special source of light. Exhibited at the Paris World Fair in 1878 The Ukranian Night attracted the attention of the eminent French critics.
            Kuinji developed a new vision in his next painting A Birch Grove (1879). It is both realistic and conventionalized; it looks as a condensed essence of reality. In 1880, he completed Moonlit Night on Dnieper (1880). The picture was a great success. Kuinji became an idol of the public. But he was not understood by his colleagues who saw in his art only illusory color effects, did not support his romantic searching. Probably it was the reason  of his withdrawal from all exhibitions and public arrangements. He worked hard in his studio, experimenting much, but only his close friends saw his works.
            In 1894, he accepted an invitation to become a professor of the Academy. He was very fond of teaching and his students admired him. Among Kuinji’s pupils were several prominent artists such as N. Rerikh, K. Bogaevskiy, A. Rilov, V. Purvit and others. Unfortunately his career of a professor did not last long, he was dismissed for supporting students in their protests against authorities. But he continued to teach his students privately, and then paid for their trip around Europe. Later he presented the Academy with a big sum of money, the interest from which was to be used for awards to young painters.
In 1909, he founded The Kuinji Society, an independent association of painters, to which he left all his pictures and property. The next year he died.
     The other well-known works of Kuinji are A Birch Grove (1879), with one of its late versions A Birch Grove (1901), The North (1879),  After a Rain (1879), Sea. The Crimea. (1898-1908), Elbrus in the Evening. (1898-1908), Sunset (1890-1895), Rainbow (1900-1905), Night Grazing (1905-1908).

Bibliography:
Kuinji and His School. Leningrad. 1987.
Kuinji. Russian Painters of the XIX century. by V. Minin. Moscow. 1990.
Paintings of the 18th-early 20th centuries from the Reserves of the Russian Museum. by K. Mikhailova and G. Smirnov. Leningrad. 1982.


17 posted on 06/08/2005 8:08:36 PM PDT by vannrox (The Preamble to the Bill of Rights - without it, our Bill of Rights is meaningless!)
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To: vannrox

bump


18 posted on 06/08/2005 8:10:34 PM PDT by FranklinsTower
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To: vannrox

BTTT.


19 posted on 06/08/2005 8:12:48 PM PDT by mowkeka
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To: Publius6961

"I dare any current weenie to jam that much beauty and power into a canvas today."

No kidding. The quality of light achieved by the Masters is beyond photography's reach. And painting such as this is true artistry, hack's need not apply.


20 posted on 06/08/2005 8:24:05 PM PDT by avenir (Don't insult my intelligentness!)
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To: vannrox
It seems to me that a legitimate artist could be far more marketable, they could actually sell their paintings to a large swath of normal people that would enjoy them. You don't even need a gallery anymore, the web is a great place to display your work and it doesn't have to pass through the government-funded deranged artist effetes.
21 posted on 06/08/2005 8:24:14 PM PDT by Brett66 (Howard Dean - the gift that keeps on giving)
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To: mowkeka





22 posted on 06/08/2005 8:25:27 PM PDT by vannrox (The Preamble to the Bill of Rights - without it, our Bill of Rights is meaningless!)
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To: vannrox

Fantastic article! I sent it off to an artist friend of mine whose web site I will be updating shortly. He is an incredible glass artist of some renown that feels the same way about glass. I would love to see the ideas in this article spill over into the glass world!

Chihluly comes to mind as the greatest example of no substance.


23 posted on 06/08/2005 8:42:30 PM PDT by abner (Looking for a new tagline- Next outrage please!-)
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To: Socratic

the wallpaper represents the torment of theyoung bride's predicament... stare at the wallpaper and as your eyes relax the images of her two lovers will become apparent and she is lamenting having to make the choice. notice her leanings and the obvious number of handmaidens are respectfully representative of the fears of choosing poorly, spinster-ship, lesbianism, suffocation, and wastefullness.

teeman

or it could be that the painter forgot to crop the sucker.


24 posted on 06/08/2005 8:42:34 PM PDT by teeman8r
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This was to convey the fragility of the planet's water supply. "It's terrifying and awful when you realize that billions of tons of pollutants are flowing down the Niagara River every day," Moore said.

I guess I shouldn't be surprised at the abject stupidity demonstrated in this statement, since the artist likely didn't pay much attention in math class, but...

... Niagara Falls drops 150,000 gallons of water every second, or 12,960,000,000 gallons per day.

... one billion tons of water is 239,808,153,477 gallons.

In other words, it takes about eighteen and a half days for only one billion tons, let alone "billions" of tons, of water to flow over Niagara Falls. So in order for "billions of tons of pollutants to flow down the Niagara River in a single day, a goodly portion of the countryside of New York and Canada would have to be flooded with 100% pure pollutants.

25 posted on 06/08/2005 8:43:37 PM PDT by mvpel (Michael Pelletier)
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To: vannrox
Thanks for posting this article. And for the hope it conveys...
26 posted on 06/08/2005 8:50:04 PM PDT by okie01 (The Mainstream Media: IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
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To: infidel29

Hey, I have that same picture, only ours is titled "Wall."


27 posted on 06/08/2005 8:52:20 PM PDT by Howlin (Up or down on Janice Brown!)
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To: vannrox

bump


28 posted on 06/08/2005 8:53:10 PM PDT by Tribune7
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To: mvpel
So in order for "billions of tons of pollutants to flow down the Niagara River in a single day, a goodly portion of the countryside of New York and Canada would have to be flooded with 100% pure pollutants.

Perhaps the water is super-saturated with Moore's "art"...

29 posted on 06/08/2005 8:56:10 PM PDT by okie01 (The Mainstream Media: IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
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To: vannrox

I dropped out of art school in the 70's (1970's) because no one would teach me how to draw or paint. Globs of orange acrylic paint, straight out of the tube, dribbled onto aluminum foil were cheered as "art" while anything requiring thought, skill, and practice was soundly derided . The antipathy toward representational art was pervasive and harsh.

Since then I've learned by doing and by studying with other artists. I now have many friends -- other traditional oil painters -- who had the same experience during those years. Back then I thought I might be simple and "unsophisticated" but I've since learned otherwise.

Thanks for posting.


30 posted on 06/08/2005 8:56:53 PM PDT by fullchroma
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To: Ditter

"I am an artist and I am sick of so called art that consists of rubber chickens hanging from dead branches and other such rubbish that I have actually seen in galleries."

True story. My college roommate was an art major. One of her professors kept giving her awful grades on her projects bcse she wasn't being "provocative" enough. So she got a wooden salad bowl and painted it pink. Inside it, she glued a headless Barbie doll, a used maxi-pad, and fake acrylic fingernails. Then she wrote "Womanhood" on the rim of the bowl and turned it in. He gave it an "A."


31 posted on 06/08/2005 9:01:35 PM PDT by MonaMars
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To: vannrox
In 2001, English artist Jacqueline Crofton was banned for life from the Tate Galleries after she threw two eggs at an artwork in the Tate.

Banned??? But she was expressing herself! That's art! How can the modern art crowd fail to appreciate her self-expression?

32 posted on 06/08/2005 9:03:41 PM PDT by GovernmentShrinker
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To: mowkeka

I've been an artist my entire life, my mother was a talented artist, and she encouraged me from the moment I could hold a pencil. I suffered through endless classes in high school and college listening to no-talent hacks babble about "expression" and "individuality", all the while, they all wore the same black clothes, had the same dyed-red hair, and created the same, bland, lackluster dreck they called 'art". It's gotten steadily worse, the art field is completely inbred, incestuous, more about politics and cliques than talent, and is completeley hollow and a sham.

I decided to pursue illustration, as it still seemed to hold the things I value in art, and is lacking in "fine art": skill, technique, discipline, thought, and you could make a living at it. I still paint on my own, and maybe someday I'll exhibit it. But, after the indignities I experienced with the babbling idiots in art class, it turned me off pursuing the gallery field completely - it's all political anyway.

I remember seeing senior projects in a gallery - a prize winner was a bundle of sticks.

I remember a *required* class for art majors, where the teacher (who did'nt grade or take attendance) spent the classes I bothered going to explaining how to force landlords in warehouse districts to allow work-live arrangements, force them to install plumbing, and how to work the private, state and Federal grant systems so you would'nt have to get a job. When she was'nt ranting how unfair those greedy landlords were, she made us endure tedious, ridiculous arguements between red-headed "artists" in black debating if the public's reaction to your work had any meaning. (I literally stood up and left that class mid rant)

I took a symbolism class in college, where we were allowed to pursue our own agenda, and since I was studying illustration, I worked on a series of paintings with a common thread, with enthusiastic encouragement from my teacher. Halfway through the class, sadly, the teacher died suddenly (he was a great teacher, too, an honestly nice person, and very talented), and a woman who'd been painting for *2 years* with no formal training , degree, or even teaching experience took over, and forced us to look at her "art", which were canvases with paint piled so high, it looked like the seagull guano on an old pier. She did'nt outright demand we all work in the abstract, as all of us were half a semester into our work, and eventually stopped talking to anyone but the small group of students doing abstract work. When we submitted our projects, she failed everyone who *did'nt* do abstract work, declaring it was a class on abstract expressionism, and wrote up smarmy, snotty comments ripping our work apart. We took it to the dean, and he re-graded us - I've yet to see a teacher look that disgusted at another teacher before, or since.

I took a senior level watercolor class, where the "visiting" professor (he was a grad student, a relative of someone high up in the school, we heard) had never really used watercolors, and refuses to teach us technique, even when we as a group demanded it. We ended up taking over the class, and taught each other. After the semester, we all found our grades for the class missing, no record of it anywhere on our transcripts...the idiot had never submitted any of the paperwork all semester, and they "could'nt find him", to get our grades. This was a guy, we had been told, who was a featured gallery artist, and was very respected in the field. He was a dirty, unwashed hippy type, dumb as a bag of rocks, and we never did see his art - the one time he tried to actually teach the class, he proved he had no clue how to hold a paintrbrush or paint anything but bright, colored blobs.

I took a class that was required by illustration majors and fine art majors - and he sneered the entire semester at illustration students, because - and this is a direct quote - "They get PAID to paint".

I've spent my entire life learning technique, from charcoal and pencil, to conte and pastels, to guache and watercolor, oil and acrylic, clay, wax, bronze, you name it. I'm immersed myself in materials of the trade, spent most of my life before an easel or a drafting board...and go to shows, where the 'artists" don't have a clue about any of it, and will defend "found" materials (ie. trash) versus traditional materials. It boggles the mind. Art used to be something you dedicated your life to, these limp wristed toadies can't even tell the difference between a filbert and a round paintbrush. If they even USE brushes - most of the art students I had to endure finger painted under the loving approval of idiotic teachers.

I'll subscribe to this magazine - I've been a huge fan of artist's like l. Alma Tedama, from the moment I saw his "Spring" hanging at the Getty in Malibu, and the first time I saw the exquisite Gerome at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco - their technique is absolutely mind-boggingly perfect, and the paintings hold you spell-bound.

I also discovered another "lost" artist, who is still sneered at because he was a "commercial" artist - Maxfield Parrish.

What a joy, to see art that isn't selfishly about anger, bitterness, childish expressions of outrage at politics or social issues, or expressions of narcissistic and promiscuous sexuality. "Art" these days, pardon the expression, is just mental masterbation, and should be rejected...but then, looking at prime time TV and the current state of the world of literature and movies...I'm not holding my breath it'll change anytime soon.

I was born 100 years too late, or early, truly.


33 posted on 06/08/2005 9:03:51 PM PDT by ByDesign
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To: vannrox

Could it be the bigger fool theory in art is about to come to an end?

Imagine the poor schnooks stuck with million dollar urinals.


34 posted on 06/08/2005 9:04:42 PM PDT by Age of Reason
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To: stylin19a

Christo falls on one side or the other of an orange shower curtain, but it hardly matters which side, since they're both the same (not to mention the same as each of the other gazillion orange shower curtains with which he trashed Central Park).


35 posted on 06/08/2005 9:07:48 PM PDT by GovernmentShrinker
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To: little jeremiah

Piero Manzoni died 1953

"Merde d'artista"

http://home.sprynet.com/~mindweb/can.htm


36 posted on 06/08/2005 9:08:41 PM PDT by beaver fever
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To: little jeremiah

Typo died 1963.


37 posted on 06/08/2005 9:11:44 PM PDT by beaver fever
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To: GovernmentShrinker

Cristo's umbrellas killed one person in California and one person in Japan. I'm sure that the "artist" finds something creative and "living" in that art.


38 posted on 06/08/2005 9:12:05 PM PDT by bannie (The government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend upon the support of Paul.)
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To: vannrox

What a wonderful article. I feel vindicated. I knew, at twelve years of age, modern art was crap and I said it. I was told I was too young to understand. I said the same thing at 20 and was told it was lack of education. At 30 I was told I was "old fashioned and a stick in the mud". I'm just glad to find out that I wasn't the crazy person, they were! (I always knew they were)


39 posted on 06/08/2005 9:12:10 PM PDT by pepperdog
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To: teeman8r
or it could be that the painter forgot to crop the sucker.

Precisely! The modern aesthetic would have it in a landscape format and have cropped out the "superfluous" elements. Now, if it were "The Yellow Wallpaper" there might be even more psychological thrills for the viewer.

40 posted on 06/08/2005 9:14:13 PM PDT by Socratic (Honor the Liberator - He toils for you.)
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To: Socratic

The images of "The Yellow Wallpaper" are seared in a circular pattern around the walls of my mind.

:p


41 posted on 06/08/2005 9:16:44 PM PDT by bannie (The government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend upon the support of Paul.)
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To: ByDesign
Fascinating post, thanks for your input. I'm glad to know there are actual artists out there like you. I've always worn my disdain for the art world as a badge of honor because of the people you described. I'm more into the art of film/video personally, and it kills me to see what's passed off as "genius" sometimes. Like the galleries you rightly rail against, all it takes in the film/video world is a little anger, nudity, and filth before the so-called "experts" fall all over themselves praising it.

Hopefully, the arts you and I love will turn around.

42 posted on 06/08/2005 9:20:07 PM PDT by Future Snake Eater (The plan was simple, like my brother-in-law Phil. But unlike Phil, this plan just might work.)
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To: Future Snake Eater

BUMP!


43 posted on 06/08/2005 9:21:48 PM PDT by Publius6961 (The most abundant things in the universe are ignorance, stupidity and hydrogen)
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To: mvpel; John Valentine
Pollutants falling over the Niagara Fall?!
Sounds like a whole lotta aerification going on.

Here's a camping tip: when retrieving water from a mountain stream use a waterfall or white water source to avoid giardia.

44 posted on 06/08/2005 9:23:38 PM PDT by TeleStraightShooter (When Frist exercises his belated Constitutional "Byrd option", Reid will have a "Nuclear Reaction".)
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To: bannie
The images of "The Yellow Wallpaper" are seared in a circular pattern around the walls of my mind.

Let's just hope you're not going though life muttering and squeaking.

45 posted on 06/08/2005 9:26:15 PM PDT by Socratic (Honor the Liberator - He toils for you.)
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To: vannrox
Thanks for the reminder. After viewing the exhibit I learned everything I could about Kuinji. I spent weeks reading everything I could find.
The only thing I regret not doing is pursuing my intention of getting a high quality print of that painting directly from the Hermitage. I was half hoping I could make it to St. Petersburg, too.
Hasn't happened..... yet.
46 posted on 06/08/2005 9:27:28 PM PDT by Publius6961 (The most abundant things in the universe are ignorance, stupidity and hydrogen)
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To: Socratic

I painted over the wallpaper with a lovely, warm beige--muttering and sputtering as I did so!

LOL


47 posted on 06/08/2005 9:29:03 PM PDT by bannie (The government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend upon the support of Paul.)
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To: bannie

LOL


48 posted on 06/08/2005 9:30:10 PM PDT by Socratic (Honor the Liberator - He toils for you.)
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To: MonaMars

Great example. What is your very creative and subversively defiant (if that isn't provocative, I don't know what is) former roommate up to these days?


49 posted on 06/08/2005 9:31:00 PM PDT by fullchroma
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Bump


50 posted on 06/08/2005 9:32:57 PM PDT by Dr.Zoidberg (Children's classic songs updated for Islam "If you're happy and you know it, Go Kaboom!")
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