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The War is Over, and We Won
The American Enterprise Online ^ | 6/20/05 | Karl Zinsmeister

Posted on 06/22/2005 7:01:38 AM PDT by Valin

Your editor returned to Iraq in April and May of 2005 for another embedded period of reporting. I could immediately see improvements compared to my earlier extended tours during 2003 and 2004. The Iraqi security forces, for example, are vastly more competent, and in some cases quite inspiring. Baghdad is now choked with traffic. Cell phones have spread like wildfire. And satellite TV dishes sprout from even the most humble mud hovels in the countryside.

Many of the soldiers I spent time with during this spring had also been deployed during the initial invasion back in 2003. Almost universally they talked to me about how much change they could see in the country. They noted progress in the attitudes of the people, in the condition of important infrastructure, in security.

I observed many examples of this myself. Take the two very different Baghdad neighborhoods of Haifa Street and Sadr City. The first is an upper-end commercial district in the heart of downtown. The second is one of Baghdad’s worst slums, on the city’s north edge.

I spent lots of time walking both neighborhoods this spring—something that would not have been possible a year earlier, when both were active war zones, where tanks poured shells into buildings on a regular basis. Today, the primary work of our soldiers in each area is rebuilding sewers, paving roads, getting buildings repaired and secured, supplying schools and hospitals, getting trash picked up, managing traffic, and encouraging honest local governance.

What the establishment media covering Iraq have utterly failed to make clear today is this central reality: With the exception of periodic flare-ups in isolated corners, our struggle in Iraq as warfare is over. Egregious acts of terror will continue—in Iraq as in many other parts of the world. But there is now no chance whatever of the U.S. losing this critical guerilla war.

Contrary to the impression given by most newspaper headlines, the United States has won the day in Iraq. In 2004, our military fought fierce battles in Najaf, Fallujah, and Sadr City. Many thousands of terrorists were killed, with comparatively little collateral damage. As examples of the very hardest sorts of urban combat, these will go down in history as smashing U.S. victories.

And our successes at urban combat (which, scandalously, are mostly untold stories in the U.S.) made it crystal clear to both the terrorists and the millions of moderate Iraqis that the insurgents simply cannot win against today’s U.S. Army and Marines. That’s why everyday citizens have surged into politics instead.

The terrorist struggle has hardly ended. Even a very small number of vicious men operating in secret will find opportunities to blow up outdoor markets and public buildings, assassinate prominent political figures, and knock down office towers. But public opinion is not on the insurgents’ side, and the battle of Iraq is no longer one of war fighting—but of policing and politics.

Policing and political problem-solving are mostly tasks for Iraqis, not Americans. And the Iraqis are taking them up, often with gusto. I saw much evidence that responsible Iraqis are gradually isolating the small but dangerously nihilistic minority trying to strangle their new society. With each passing month, U.S. forces will more and more become a kind of SWAT team that intervenes only to multiply the force of the emerging Iraqi security forces, and otherwise stays mostly in the background.

Increasingly, the Iraqi people are taking direction of their own lives. And like all other self-ruling populations, they are more interested in improving the quality of their lives than in mindless warring. It will take some time, but Iraq has begun the process of becoming a normal country.

Karl Zinsmeister is the Editor-in-Chief of The American Enterprise.


TOPICS: Editorial; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: bushdoctrineunfolds; gnfi; iraq; oif; success; victory; winners; zinsmeister
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1 posted on 06/22/2005 7:01:38 AM PDT by Valin
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To: Valin

OUTSTANDING POST! Thanks.


2 posted on 06/22/2005 7:02:56 AM PDT by PGalt
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To: Valin

I will feel better with the new constitution adopted and the permanent government elected.


3 posted on 06/22/2005 7:04:59 AM PDT by Unam Sanctam
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To: Valin
Good to see what I say every day is being backed up by others who are knowledgeable about this.

I'm tempted to ping some of the FR naysayers (like the guy who told me my vision of Iraq was skewed because I'm in Iraq) and gloat, but I'll take the high road and refrain. ;-)

4 posted on 06/22/2005 7:08:18 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Unam Sanctam

January?


5 posted on 06/22/2005 7:09:12 AM PDT by Valin (The right to do something does not mean that doing it is right.)
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To: Allegra

I'm tempted to ping some of the FR naysayers

Please do.


6 posted on 06/22/2005 7:10:10 AM PDT by Valin (The right to do something does not mean that doing it is right.)
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To: Valin
Bookmark for later.

I saw Zinsmeister give a talk on his last book on C-SPAN, and I was impressed not only with him, but with the young soldiers he described. The best was when he met a CPA who was serving as a private and driving a Humvee. When asked why he would give up being a CPA to be a private (he could have been an officer with his education) he said, "I will be able to say I helped change the world." It made me wish I was young enough to sign up again.

7 posted on 06/22/2005 7:10:38 AM PDT by Mr. Silverback (SPC Casey Sheehan died trying to save his buddies. His leftist mom says it "wasn't worth it.")
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To: Valin
This being the norm, and terrorist actions the exception. Our mainstream media covers only the terrorist actions, highlighting the death and destruction. Creating a false sense of whoa for our military, creating animosity and regret back home, and encouraging terrorists all over to continue on.

Normally that is called aiding and abetting the enemy. And that is called TREASON.

8 posted on 06/22/2005 7:12:55 AM PDT by mountn man (Everyone brings joy into a room. Some when they enter. Others when they leave)
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To: Valin

ANother reason why the Reids, Pelosis and Durbins
are so loudly proclaiming the US is LOSING the Iraq
War! The truth about conditions in the freed nation
is about to descend on them despite the propagandist coverups provided by their media allies.


9 posted on 06/22/2005 7:13:07 AM PDT by Grendel9 (uick)
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To: Valin

I hope...


10 posted on 06/22/2005 7:13:11 AM PDT by Unam Sanctam
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To: Allegra

like the guy who told me my vision of Iraq was skewed because I'm in Iraq

Question. Should I be having this shooting pain in my head?


11 posted on 06/22/2005 7:13:58 AM PDT by Valin (The right to do something does not mean that doing it is right.)
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To: Valin

I know we’re winning but what’s the score?


12 posted on 06/22/2005 7:14:13 AM PDT by tractorman
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To: Valin

bttt


13 posted on 06/22/2005 7:16:27 AM PDT by Hegewisch Dupa
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To: Valin
2 points:

1. Iraq is a battle, not a war. There will be many more battles.

2. Now waiting for the new Iraqi currency to skyrocket in value over the next 5 - 10 years.

14 posted on 06/22/2005 7:16:38 AM PDT by bankwalker (You get what you believe.)
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To: Valin

good one bump


15 posted on 06/22/2005 7:16:53 AM PDT by woofie ("Plunk your magic twanger, Froggy!!")
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To: Allegra

Allegra, nice to see you are still "here" and safe!


16 posted on 06/22/2005 7:19:23 AM PDT by mad_as_he$$ (Never corner anything meaner than you. NSDQ)
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To: Allegra

Naw, go ahead and gloat, really p*** em off.


17 posted on 06/22/2005 7:20:06 AM PDT by Americanexpat (A strong democracy through citizen oversight.)
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To: Valin
The Stone Age Press and their puppeteers in the DemIhateAmericRat Party cannot let this out. A win for America would be a loss for them. Why InSane wants more troops rather than more Iraqis makes no sense.

Pray for W and Our Iraq Winning Troops

18 posted on 06/22/2005 7:23:11 AM PDT by bray (Pray for Iraq's Freedom from Mohammad)
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To: Valin
Question. Should I be having this shooting pain in my head?

Right? I laughed my head off when I read that. It was in response to one of my namy posts refuting the lying media and telling it how it really is here.

He told me my vision of it all was "skewed."

I guess it's because I'm not getting my Iraq news from CNN and the New York Times. You know, I'm just seeing it every day and interacting with the Iraqi people all day long. So what the heck do I know? LOL

19 posted on 06/22/2005 7:23:29 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Allegra
I'm tempted to ping some of the FR naysayers (like the guy who told me my vision of Iraq was skewed because I'm in Iraq)

LOL!!

"You can't possibly have an objective viewpoint because you're there"

LOL!!!

"You can't know the real truth because you're too close to the action"

It's so funny, because I can just see the keyboard pontificators saying crap like that!
20 posted on 06/22/2005 7:24:12 AM PDT by motzman (now whatda?)
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To: Americanexpat; Valin; faithincowboys; MikeinIraq; Dashing Dasher
Naw, go ahead and gloat, really p*** em off.

Well, OK, you twisted my arm. ;-) I'll start with one who had a whole vanity post last week about how we're losing in Iraq and how messed up it all is.

Hey, Faith! Read this article! I'm just dying to see how you debunk this.

Pinging Mike and Dash because they "get it."

21 posted on 06/22/2005 7:27:47 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: motzman; Allegra

You're right. The problem is Allegra can't see the "big picture".

(aside) I was in a bookstore lastnight and saw 3-4 new books saying we've lost Iraq. Other customers looked at me strangely as I was picking one up and LMAO


22 posted on 06/22/2005 7:29:31 AM PDT by Valin (The right to do something does not mean that doing it is right.)
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To: Valin

Great news...........


23 posted on 06/22/2005 7:32:08 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Allegra
Would you PLEASE stop using eye witness accounts to support your fact-based statements.

The liberals hate that and it will really upset Faith - when her three day mandatory confinement is over. Who called in the 5150?


24 posted on 06/22/2005 7:34:41 AM PDT by Dashing Dasher (Jun 22, 1909 The first transcontinental auto race ended in Seattle, WA, after 23 days.)
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To: Valin; motzman
I was in a bookstore lastnight and saw 3-4 new books saying we've lost Iraq.

Really? Whole books spewing that crap?

We are so NOT losing. In fact, I had given it about 5 years to really settle down and it looks like they might beat that.

The libs are delusional and doing that "wishful thinking" journalism (you know...fiction) they do so well.

25 posted on 06/22/2005 7:34:59 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Allegra

See, I knew you would feel better. Stay safe lady.


26 posted on 06/22/2005 7:39:29 AM PDT by Americanexpat (A strong democracy through citizen oversight.)
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To: Dashing Dasher
Would you PLEASE stop using eye witness accounts to support your fact-based statements.

LOL - it does have that "crucifix to a vampire" effect on liberals, doesn't it?

I need to go on DU and post some of my observations about the progress and successes here.

I haven't been banned from there in quite a while and I have a different computer and ISP now, so I can slip in there....however briefly.

27 posted on 06/22/2005 7:39:42 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Valin
Today, the primary work of our soldiers in each area is rebuilding sewers, paving roads, getting buildings repaired and secured, supplying schools and hospitals, getting trash picked up, managing traffic, and encouraging honest local governance.

The liberal dream realized.

28 posted on 06/22/2005 7:41:03 AM PDT by Protagoras (I’ve had all I can stands and I can’t stands no more.....Popeye)
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To: mad_as_he$$

I haven't seen you in ages! How are you doing?


29 posted on 06/22/2005 7:41:55 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: bankwalker
Now waiting for the new Iraqi currency to skyrocket in value over the next 5 - 10 years.

Got dinar?

30 posted on 06/22/2005 7:45:19 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Allegra

How America Lost Iraq
by Aaron Glantz
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1585424269/002-0652766-4320825?v=glance

Book Description
A reporter in Iraq shows how the U.S. squandered its early victories and goodwill among the Iraqi people, and allowed the newly freed society to slip into violence and chaos.

As a reporter for the staunchly antiwar Pacifica Radio, twenty-seven-year-old Aaron Glantz had spent much of early 2003 warning of catastrophe if the U.S. invaded Iraq. But, as he watched the statue of Saddam topple, he wondered whether he had been mistaken: In interviews with regular Iraqis, he found wide support for the Americans.

Then, public opinion changed.

In early 2004, the U.S. military initiated a completely unprovoked bombing campaign against the population of Fallujah, increasing support for an armed resistance. The attack confounded many anti-Saddam Iraqis, and plunged the nation into chaos. In How America Lost Iraq, Glantz tells his story of working on the front lines, while revealing truths that most media outlets have missed or failed to report. For instance, 50 percent of the U.S.-trained Iraqi army has either mutinied or refused to fight; the Iraqi public has sustained appalling civilian casualties; corporate contractors including Halliburton and Bechtel have failed to supply Iraqis with the basic necessities of daily life, such as clean water and electricity; and a respected poll shows that 82 percent of Iraqis want the U.S. to leave.

Here is the brutally honest account of a reporter who discovered how popular the U.S. presence was in Iraq-and who then watched this popularity disappear as the Bush administration mishandled the war, leaving us with the intractable conflict we face today.




Losing Iraq: Inside the Postwar Reconstruction Fiasco
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0813343046/ref=pd_sim_b_4/002-0652766-4320825?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance

Book Description
A disenchanted government insider's take on the planning that did go on for postwar Iraq-planning that the Bush administration willfully ignored
According to conventional wisdom, Iraq has suffered because the Bush administration had no plan for reconstruction. That's not the case; the State Department's Future of Iraq group planned out the situation carefully and extensively, and Middle East expert David Phillips was part of this group. White House ideologues and imprudent Pentagon officials decided simply to ignore those plans. The administration only listened to what it wanted to hear.

Losing Iraq doesn't just criticize the policies of unilateralism, preemption, and possible deception that launched the war; it documents the process of returning sovereignty to an occupied Iraq. Unique, as well, are Phillips's personal accounts of dissension within the administration.

The problems encountered in Iraq are troubling not only in themselves but also because they bode ill for other nation-building efforts in which the U.S. may become mired through this administration's doctrine of unilateral, preemptive war. Losing Iraq looks into the future of America's foreign policy with a clear-eyed critique of the problems that loom ahead.

-------
Squandered Victory : The American Occupation and the Bungled Effort to Bring Democracy to Iraq
by Larry Diamond
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0805078681/ref=pd_sim_b_2/002-0652766-4320825?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance

From Publishers Weekly
When Diamond got a call from his former Stanford colleague Condoleezza Rice asking if he would go to Baghdad to advise Iraqi authorities on drafting and implementing a democratic constitution, the political scientist, who had "opposed going to war but supported building the peace," was able to overcome his concerns about the region's instability. What he saw in Iraq during the first four months of 2004, however, left him extremely pessimistic about the prospects of success (although he admits all is not necessarily lost). Diamond sees a refusal to deal honestly with deteriorating conditions, particularly the rise of violent insurgency, and characterizes it as one of America's worst blunders ever; indeed, he calls that refusal "criminal negligence." Diamond's mounting personal frustration becomes apparent especially in direct confrontations with then Ambassador Paul Bremer. Though much of the story is given over to wonkish details of power brokering among Iraq's various political, ethnic and religious factions, there are also vibrant particulars of life inside the American compound, where even going out for pizza could be a life-threatening event. Such eye-witness experience bolsters this vivid critique of the current administration's foreign policy cornerstone.


31 posted on 06/22/2005 7:47:38 AM PDT by Valin (The right to do something does not mean that doing it is right.)
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To: Allegra

If you do go over there - wear hip boots and ping me to your best work.

;-)

Dasher


32 posted on 06/22/2005 7:47:53 AM PDT by Dashing Dasher (Jun 22, 1909 The first transcontinental auto race ended in Seattle, WA, after 23 days.)
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To: Allegra
Got dinar?

Yup. About 5 million. I'm ready to be patient for 5 or 10 years.

How about you?

33 posted on 06/22/2005 7:56:47 AM PDT by bankwalker (You get what you believe.)
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To: Valin
I read the whole thing, shaking my head at the unmitigated B.S. But this one really got me:

In early 2004, the U.S. military initiated a completely unprovoked bombing campaign against the population of Fallujah,

Completely unprovoked??? Is this guy on some really good hallucinogens?

First of all, the "bombing campaign" was in November 2004 (I was in Taji then and we could hear it and see the warplanes "dropping things off" in the distance), not "early 2004."

And in "early 2004," (April) it was the scumbag terrorists who were engaging our troops in Fallujah, and killing people on the roads leading in and out of it.

34 posted on 06/22/2005 8:02:26 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Unam Sanctam
RE: "I will feel better with the new constitution adopted"

I hope the USA does not worry about the Iraqi constitution too much.

I don't think Britain has ever had one and Canadians long struggle to get a constitution has led to one that may have sown the seeds of its own demise.

I know this sounds like heresy to Americans, but it is not always necessary to have a constitution for a government to work.

Free elections, guarantees of freedom of speech, religion, and a good judicial system are all still possible without a constitution.

35 posted on 06/22/2005 8:44:05 AM PDT by concrete is my business (build a foundation of superior strength)
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To: bankwalker
How about you?

I've got just over 2 million. But I'm still here, so I can get some more when the notion takes me. ;-)

36 posted on 06/22/2005 8:55:28 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Valin

"The Iraqi security forces, for example, are vastly more competent, and in some cases quite inspiring."

Could be, but their numbers are dwindling.


37 posted on 06/22/2005 8:58:19 AM PDT by Baraonda (Demographic is destiny. Don't hire 3rd world illegal aliens nor support businesses that hire them.)
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To: Allegra

Are you interested in making some money buying and shipping dinars? What is the current exchange rate on the street in Iraq?


38 posted on 06/22/2005 9:00:55 AM PDT by bankwalker (You get what you believe.)
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To: Valin

This is the truth! This war is over... What we're seeing now is the ongoing political unrest that would probably have occurred no matter how Saddam was removed or left office.

(I still wonder where the human shields are. Why are they not standing in line with those Iraqis that want to serve their country?)


39 posted on 06/22/2005 9:03:38 AM PDT by tje
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To: bankwalker
I'll ask our Iraqi guys who go out in the streets about the current exchange rate. I haven't bought any since my last tour ended in March. I'm over here on a new "gig" with a new company - just started in early May.

I don't know how easily I can ship them out. I got mine home in a series of greeting cards last year. They're watching for them now...they're on the military post office's "forbidden list" and they've been confiscating them from people leaving from the airport.

I'll ask around, though...

(I bought my first stash of 1.2 mil for $640 in January '04. They've gone up some since then.)

40 posted on 06/22/2005 9:10:19 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Valin; All
Something just went "BOOM!" in downtown Baghdad. It's really not unusual, though.

But if any of the doom and gloomers are reading this, it might brighten their day. ;-)

41 posted on 06/22/2005 9:12:13 AM PDT by Allegra (But It's A Dry Heat...)
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To: Allegra
I'm tempted to ping some of the FR naysayers (like the guy who told me my vision of Iraq was skewed because I'm in Iraq)...

No! Ha Ha!  You're at an obvious disadvantage to assess the true situation as you are without the clarifying prism of American media and the keen insight of leftist American politicians.  Oh boy, that's rich...

 Image hosted by Photobucket.com

42 posted on 06/22/2005 9:24:41 AM PDT by itsamelman (“Announcing your plans is a good way to hear God laugh.” -- Al Swearengen)
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To: bankwalker; Allegra
http://www.publicradio.org/applications/play/audio.php?media=money/2004/11/06_soundmoney.rm&start=00:14:59.0&end=00:28:31.1

 

From CNN Money (below):

http://money.cnn.com/2004/08/10/pf/expert/ask_expert/

 

Stupid currency tricks: Iraqi dinar

Q: I'm considering buying Iraqi currency as an investment. Is that a good idea?

August 10, 2004: 10:13 AM EDT
By Walter Updegrave, CNN/Money contributing columnistNEW YORK (CNN/Money) -

 

I'm considering buying Iraqi currency as an investment. Is that a good idea? — Ray Hammond, Dayton, Texas

 

Judging by the number of pitches I see from Web sites flogging the new Iraqi currency, not to mention dozens of people on eBay, there are at least some people out there who think investing in the Iraqi dinar that was introduced last October makes sense.

My take is unequivocal. Given the difficulty of predicting currency movements, I'm not even a big proponent of investing in established currencies like the euro or the yen.

And when it comes to buying and selling the fledgling currency of a fledgling government in one of the most chaotic parts of the world, that goes beyond mere speculation. I'd call it gambling.

The main argument for buying the dinar, of course, is that Iraq has vast oil and natural gas reserves at a time when energy prices are climbing. If the country gets its political act together, it could profit in a big way.

I hope things work out that way, but it's a big, big if.

And even if it does, there's no guarantee it will be able to run an economy that keeps inflation -- a major risk for currency values -- under control.

Of course, where there's great risk and uncertainty, there's also the potential for great reward. But I'd be wary of some of the information out there.

One site I visited had a chart showing the historical value of the dinar from 1932 through 1982 fluctuating between just under $5 and just under $3 per dinar. Gee, the dinar is now worth only $0.0007. Could you imagine if it made it back anywhere close to its historical range? Why you'd make a killing! Even if the dinar climbed in value to just one cent, that would represent a 1,329% return!!! Surely, it can go up at least a penny.

Really? If that's a sane rationale for investing in a currency, then why not buy the Turkish lira, which trades at $0.0000007?

Fact is, it's the economic prospects for a country that determine the future value of its currency, not the price it trades at now or the price it traded at in the past. And no matter how low a value a currency reaches, it can always go lower.

One final thing to consider if you're still thinking about investing in dinars is liquidity.

At this point, there's not a particularly organized market for them. You can get an exchange quote for dinars by going to the currency section of Bloomberg or Yahoo Finance, but the rate you'll pay varies substantially from one seller to the next.

As for selling any dinars you buy, good luck.

Frank Trotter, an executive with Everbank, the online bank that offers small investors savings and money-market accounts denominated in a variety of foreign currencies (but not Iraqi dinars) told me that his trading desk surveyed several of the online dealers posing as someone who owned dinars and wanted to sell them.

"We received no bids," said Trotter. "We haven't seen a legitimate market in terms of trading it."

That could change, of course, but probably only if the political and economic situation stabilizes. So if you want to sell dinars, for now you're pretty much relegated to eBay.

My view is that if you want to spend a few bucks to acquire Iraqi dinar as a novelty item or you want to gamble with money you can well afford to lose, that's fine. Enjoy yourself. But you shouldn't even think of making something this iffy a part of your investment portfolio.

Walter Updegrave is a senior editor at MONEY Magazine and is the author of "We're Not in Kansas Anymore: Strategies for Retiring Rich in a Totally Changed World."

43 posted on 06/22/2005 9:29:03 AM PDT by itsamelman (“Announcing your plans is a good way to hear God laugh.” -- Al Swearengen)
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To: Allegra

One of my favorite things is to read Michael Yon's website to read how things really are over there. A few weeks ago I enjoyed reading about a town that is very peaceful and people are starting to enjoy their new freedom. I read his blog to my children. They still want a soldier pen pal, though. LOL!


44 posted on 06/22/2005 9:33:42 AM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: Dashing Dasher

LMAO.


45 posted on 06/22/2005 10:28:31 AM PDT by beachn4fun ("Gunfire, RPGs and mortars ... we still deliver." sign on door, CSSC-113, Marines, Fallujah)
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To: itsamelman
there are at least some people out there who think investing in the Iraqi dinar that was introduced last October makes sense.

He is correct in what he says for the most part. However, I am speculating, not investing. Besides, he's from CNN so his mind is tainted.

46 posted on 06/22/2005 11:09:55 AM PDT by bankwalker (You get what you believe.)
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To: bankwalker
Besides, he's from CNN so his mind is tainted.

Ha Ha, good point.  BTW, I'm just curious, how do you respond to this:

One site I visited had a chart showing the historical value of the dinar from 1932 through 1982 fluctuating between just under $5 and just under $3 per dinar. Gee, the dinar is now worth only $0.0007. Could you imagine if it made it back anywhere close to its historical range? Why you'd make a killing! Even if the dinar climbed in value to just one cent, that would represent a 1,329% return!!! Surely, it can go up at least a penny.

Really? If that's a sane rationale for investing in a currency, then why not buy the Turkish lira, which trades at $0.0000007?

 

I don't know, perhaps you do speculate in all kinds of currency.  Like I said, just curious.  My bro-in-law is stationed in Bahrain and sent me an e-mail with the dinar opportunity a while back...

 

 

 

 

47 posted on 06/22/2005 11:56:13 AM PDT by itsamelman (“Announcing your plans is a good way to hear God laugh.” -- Al Swearengen)
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To: bankwalker

He probably has dinars stashed in drawers, knowing full well that gambling at these prices is more akin to cheap thrills in Las Vegas, with a greater likelihood of breaking even or of making money.

Of course, if he's from CNN, it may seem too patriotic to endorse speculation on Iraq's currency. I mean, that would mean Americans would be betting on Iraq's prosperous future.


48 posted on 06/22/2005 12:03:39 PM PDT by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
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To: Valin

Isn't this fellow the author of 'Boots on the Ground' - the story of the Battle of Bagdad? Great read, and he's a great interview, too.


49 posted on 06/22/2005 12:13:46 PM PDT by Shazolene
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To: itsamelman
The old dinar and the new one are 2 different currencies in 2 different counties (old and new iraq).

Turkey is a relatively stable country compared to new Iraq, nothing to speculate on.

New Iraq is a unique situation, and I am betting that in 5 or 10 years it will be a stable country with a strong economy and the currency that I bought under the worst possible conditions will be worth more than I paid for it.

Worst case is I lose the money I paid, no more. I think it is a smart bet. He is entitled to think what he wants. Time will tell.

50 posted on 06/22/2005 12:53:03 PM PDT by bankwalker (You get what you believe.)
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