Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Young Labeled 'Entitlement Generation'
AP ^ | 6/26/05 | MARTHA IRVINE

Posted on 06/27/2005 6:36:38 AM PDT by GPBurdell

By MARTHA IRVINE, AP National WriterSun Jun 26, 4:43 PM ET

Evan Wayne thought he was prepared for anything during a recent interview for a job in radio sales. Then the interviewer hit the 24-year-old Chicagoan with this: "So, we call you guys the 'Entitlement Generation,'" the baby boomer executive said, expressing an oft-heard view of today's young work force. "You think you're entitled to everything."

Such labeling is, perhaps, a rite of passage for every crop of twentysomethings. In their day, baby boomers were rabble-rousing hippies, while Gen Xers were apathetic slackers.

Now, deserved or not, this latest generation is being pegged, too — as one with shockingly high expectations for salary, job flexibility and duties but little willingness to take on grunt work or remain loyal to a company.

"We're seeing an epidemic of people who are having a hard time making the transition to work — kids who had too much success early in life and who've become accustomed to instant gratification," says Dr. Mel Levine, a pediatrics professor at the University of North Carolina Medical School and author of a book on the topic called "Ready or Not, Here Life Comes."

While Levine also notes that today's twentysomethings are long on idealism and altruism, "many of the individuals we see are heavily committed to something we call 'fun.'"

He partly faults coddling parents and colleges for doing little to prepare students for the realities of adulthood and setting the course for what many disillusioned twentysomethings are increasingly calling their "quarter-life crisis."

Meanwhile, employers from corporate executives to restaurateurs and retailers are frustrated.

"It seems they want and expect everything that the 20- or 30-year veteran has the first week they're there," says Mike Amos, a Salt Lake City-based franchise consultant for Perkins Restaurants.

Just about any twentysomething will tell you they know someone like this, and may even have some of those high expectations themselves.

Wayne had this response for his interviewer at the radio station: "Maybe we WERE spoiled by your generation. But I think the word 'entitled' isn't necessarily the word," he said. "Do we think we're deserving if we're going to go out there and bust our ass for you? Yes."

He ended up getting the job — and, as he starts this month, is vowing to work hard.

Some experts who study young people think having some expectations, and setting limits with bosses, isn't necessarily negative.

"It's true they're not eager to bury themselves in a cubicle and take orders from bosses for the next 40 years, and why should they?" asks Jeffrey Arnett, a University of Maryland psychologist who's written a book on "emerging adulthood," the period between age 18 and 25. "They have a healthy skepticism of the commitment their employers have to them and the commitment they owe to their employers."

Many young people also want to avoid becoming just another cog who works for a faceless giant.

Anthony DeBetta, a 23-year-old New Yorker, works with other twentysomethings at a small marketing firm — and says the company's size makes him feel like he can make a difference.

"We have a vested interest in the growth of this firm," he says.

Elsewhere, Liz Ryan speculates that a more relaxed work environment at the company she runs — no set hours and "a lot of latitude in how our work gets done" — helps inspire her younger employees.

"Maybe twentysomethings have figured out something that boomers like me took two decades to piece together: namely, that there's more to life than by-the-book traditional career success," says Ryan, the 45-year-old CEO of a Colorado-based company called WorldWIT, an on and offline networking organization for professional women.

As much as some employers would like to resist the trend, a growing number are searching for ways to retain twentysomething employees — and to figure out what makes them tick.

"The manager who says I don't have time for that is going to be stuck on the endless turnover treadmill," says Eric Chester, a Colorado-based consultant who works with corporations to understand what he calls "kidployees," ages 16 to 24.

At Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, for instance, administrators have developed an internship with mentoring and more training for young nurses that has curbed turnover by more than 50 percent and increased job satisfaction.

Amos at Perkins Restaurants says small changes also have helped — loosening standards on piercings or allowing cooks to play music in the kitchen.

And Muvico, a company with movie theaters in a few Southern states, gives sporting goods and music gift certificates to young staffers who go beyond minimum duties.

"If you just expect them to stand behind a register and smile, they're not going to do that unless you tell them why that's important and then recognize them for it," says John Spano, Muvico's human resources director.

Still others are focusing on getting twentysomethings more prepared.

Neil Heyse, an instructor at Pennsylvania's Villanova University, has started a company called MyGuidewire to provide career coaching for young people.

"It's a hot issue and I think it's getting hotter all the time," Heyse says of work readiness. "There's a great amount of anxiety beneath the surface."

___

On the Net:

Chester's site: http://www.generationwhy.com

Heyse's site: http://www.myguidewire.com/

___

Martha Irvine is a national writer specializing in coverage of people in their 20s and younger. She can be reached at mirvine(at)ap.org


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: entitlementgen; entitlements; generation; genx; twentysomethings; young
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-107 next last
Contrast these people with the young men and women in our Armed Forces. The folks in the Armed Forces don't have an entitlement mentality.

Buzz
Buzz Blog

1 posted on 06/27/2005 6:36:39 AM PDT by GPBurdell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
Gen Xers were apathetic slackers.

Many still are... saw a bunch of them along the Va Beach boardwalk this weekend....

2 posted on 06/27/2005 6:39:36 AM PDT by theDentist (The Dems have put all their eggs in one basket-case: Howard "Belltower" Dean.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
Entitlement Generation - That' pretty rich coming from the spineless boomer generation who is selling America down the tubes.

The folks in the Armed Forces don't have an entitlement mentality.

Most of 'em grew up poor and learned early on that if you want something, you better work for it. The brats of the EG had too much material stuff thrown at them, instead of tough love which is what they needed.

3 posted on 06/27/2005 6:42:41 AM PDT by Clock King
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

Or maybe some of the so-called "entitlement generation" are just not going to take the same crap that our parents took. My mom has been a dedicated employee for 32 years at the same company. Has a perfect record. Never takes her full allotment of vacation or sick time. Her bosses treat her like crap. They have no respect for her. They treat her like a dog. Maybe we're just sick of being taken for granted. Maybe we want a boss that will give us respect (after we've earned it). But we don't want to wait 30 or 40 years - and still not have it.


4 posted on 06/27/2005 6:45:33 AM PDT by WomanBiologist
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
Evan Wayne thought he was prepared for anything during a recent interview for a job in radio sales. Then the interviewer hit the 24-year-old Chicagoan with this: "So, we call you guys the 'Entitlement Generation,'" the baby boomer executive said, expressing an oft-heard view of today's young work force. "You think you're entitled to everything."

It's an interesting concept and this anecdotal evidence as cited does make one say "hmmm". But to call ANY one generation in America an 'entitlement' generation well.. that's absolute pabulum.

As the observant Robert J. Samuelson noted in a column in the Washington Post from March, we're a nation of 'Welfare Junkies'/"Entitlement Junkies". The finger can be pointed squarely at each succesive generation in America, probably since the days of Woodrow Wilson that has increasingly voted itself public largesse.

That having been said, my generation (post 1976 -- probably earlier than that really) don't understand that they aren't going to start out their adult existance with everything their parents had and worked hard for over many, many years.

If the latest generation has grown to feel entitled to cell phones, a great paying job and whatever else -- they've learned from example.

5 posted on 06/27/2005 6:46:32 AM PDT by soundandvision
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Clock King

Let's talk about entitlement. Companies think they are entitled to have you available 24/7 through email and pagers and laptops. They think they are entitled to know what you do on your non-work hours. And they think they are entitled to dump you at a whim to hire a bunch of cheaper labor offshore.

The bottom line is, we are all free agents, whether we like it or not, and you better be prepared to continually sell yourself to many different companies over the span of your career.


6 posted on 06/27/2005 6:46:42 AM PDT by dfwgator (Congratulations Longhorns.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
. "They have a healthy skepticism of the commitment their employers have to them and the commitment they owe to their employers."

Healthy skepticism? That's an understatement. Employers in the past couple of decades have made it quite clear that they have no commitment to their employees. With a piece of capital equipment the company at least has to keep it on the books for a few years. They don't even feel that much loyalty to their employees. If the company sees all employment as essentially day labor, fine. But don't expect the employees to give the employee 100% of their life under those terms.

7 posted on 06/27/2005 6:48:31 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (Bork should have had Kennedy's USSC seat and Kelo v. New London would have gone the other way.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

The real "Entitlement Generation" is the baby boomers, who clearly have no problem with feeling entitled to spend both their parents' and childrens' wealth, while assuming no responsibility whatsoever to pull the apple cart off the train tracks.


8 posted on 06/27/2005 6:50:37 AM PDT by thoughtomator (The U.S. Constitution poses no serious threat to our form of government)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

GENERATION E


9 posted on 06/27/2005 6:51:06 AM PDT by TheOtherOne (I often sacrifice my spelling on the alter of speed™)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: KarlInOhio

When I was in the World Trade Center during the bombing in 1993, I got paid up to the minute the bomb went off. Escaping with my life was apparently on my own time. Since then I've had a "healthy" (insert dripping irony) skepticism of the commitment of corporations to their employees.


10 posted on 06/27/2005 6:51:39 AM PDT by thoughtomator (The U.S. Constitution poses no serious threat to our form of government)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

If you want to see entitlement, look no further than senior citizen's who paid $ 1,000 into SS and now get that much out per month, and it's still not enough for them.


11 posted on 06/27/2005 6:54:26 AM PDT by Bossy Gillis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
The 18-21 year olds who work for me on rehabs certainly don't feel a sense of "entitlement" - they are wathcing their parents worry about layoffs, health insurance and mortgage payments. What they are is cynical about both government and business - they tend see the world as a matter of "every man for himself, and fate against all".

You can expect their respect, but only if you earn it, and you can't expect loyalty to a job or employer - watching the way their parents have been treated has trained them to look out for number one.

Of course, these are mostly blue collar or lower middle class kids, their patents aren't buying them ANY BMWs.

12 posted on 06/27/2005 6:55:39 AM PDT by M. Dodge Thomas (More of the same, only with more zeros on the end.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Clock King

"Entitlement Generation - That' pretty rich coming from the spineless boomer generation who is selling America down the tubes."

Yep.

I am a Gen Xer, I suppose. GWI and Kosovo vet.

Worked at a major oil company for about 6 months before deciding I could do it better --- "meetings" "committees" = B.S. Went out on my own.

I gathered up some partners, and we have multiple employees working for us; no debt --- personal or company.

Almost all it takes is the guts to leave.


13 posted on 06/27/2005 6:59:13 AM PDT by MeanWestTexan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

"They have a healthy skepticism of the commitment their employers have to them and the commitment they owe to their employers."

I think this is a significant point. Why would anyone be more than nominally loyal to an employer who has no loyalty. Yes folks, the latest crop of twenty-somethings can be motivated just as their parents could.

What motivates people has not changed.


14 posted on 06/27/2005 7:04:03 AM PDT by Poser (Joining Belly Girl in the Pajamahadeen)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

At my office, the talk is that anyone who is just getting out of college would be a fool to work for a large corporation.

If you're going to work hard, you might as well have your own business and reap the rewards of your efforts.

This leaves corporations with the bottom half of the labor pool. Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch....


15 posted on 06/27/2005 7:05:20 AM PDT by proxy_user
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator

"The bottom line is, we are all free agents, whether we like it or not, and you better be prepared to continually sell yourself to many different companies over the span of your career."

Well said! I like your style and willingness to say what the younger generation needs to hear to succeed. I've had four distinct and different "careers" to date over my 30-year span of working for a living. If a person can't think outside the box, stay flexible, live beneath their means so they're not TIED to a paycheck, educate themselves and learn to exploit their own special talents and gifts, they deserve a cr@ppy job that's "beneath" them.

Reading list for anyone that's interested:

"Do What You Love...The Money Will Follow"

"Making a Living Withot a Job"

ANY book by Barbara Sher

"The Pathfinder"

And a hundred other great titles here:

http://www.investinyourselfbooks.com (No affiliation, I just like their selections.)


16 posted on 06/27/2005 7:06:55 AM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Poser
What motivates people has not changed.

That's so true. In fact, if anything I think as the youngest generation grows into its 30's and 40's it's learning that it will have to adapt and change to stay in the work force.

This isn't an era of 1 job loyalty for life. The modern business model doesn't seem to allow a 1 job/1 company for life ideal. Not that that was ever an ideal to begin with.

17 posted on 06/27/2005 7:08:16 AM PDT by soundandvision
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

I have yet to see anything good from the baby boomer generation.


18 posted on 06/27/2005 7:14:11 AM PDT by Mortikhi
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Clock King
That' pretty rich coming from the spineless boomer generation who is selling America down the tubes.

Ain't THAT the truth. The hippies that later discovered money are somehow disappointed that these twenty-somethings never spent much time and energy revolutionizing against the moral infrastructure and capitalist institutions that made this country great. Why...the slackers!

19 posted on 06/27/2005 7:15:16 AM PDT by guitfiddlist (When the 'Rats break out switchblades, it's no time to invoke Robert's Rules.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Clock King

Who is the REAL entitlement generation? Think the 'greatest generation'. When they came of age America had no debt, and its industry ruled. When they retired we were deeply in debt and our industry not as competitive.

So what do they ask for.. maybe an apology? Nope they want their full fat SS checks, and now medicare and medicaid too, and the new perscription drug benefit. They made 13.5% rate of return on their SS investments those people who retire this year. Not too shabby.


20 posted on 06/27/2005 7:17:09 AM PDT by ran15
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: WomanBiologist; A. Pole; Rca2000; Aliska; hedgetrimmer; neutrino; Willie Green; Sam the Sham
Or maybe some of the so-called "entitlement generation" are just not going to take the same crap that our parents took. My mom has been a dedicated employee for 32 years at the same company. Has a perfect record. Never takes her full allotment of vacation or sick time. Her bosses treat her like crap. They have no respect for her. They treat her like a dog. Maybe we're just sick of being taken for granted. Maybe we want a boss that will give us respect (after we've earned it). But we don't want to wait 30 or 40 years - and still not have it.

I understand where some of these younger people (I'll be 39 next week) come from on one level, you just said it. I know you have to prove yourself to employers and beyond that but I think there is some loyalty expected in return to the employee if they do their best and get the jobs done. Like you, growing up in a single parent home, I've seen my mother put up with a lot of crap only to get stepped on. Yes, there are time we all have to buck up, but there are times I think the pendulum has swung too far in the employer's camp. I'm old enough to remember the stable post-war economy, well at least as it continued onward into the 1960's and 1970's until what we knew started to crumble in the late 1980's and 1990's (although it started earlier than that in some industries). Maybe what my parents and the slightly younger baby boomers experienced was an abberation but I really don't think this bodes well for our economy and security. I don't know, I guess I'm becoming more cynical myself, but believe me, I hear ya. I think we need some middle ground and common sense here.

Pinging the usual crowd I discuss economics with.
21 posted on 06/27/2005 7:22:59 AM PDT by Nowhere Man (Lutheran, Conservative, Neo-Victorian/Edwardian, Michael Savage in '08! - DeCAFTA-nate CAFTA!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

If the young feel entitled, who taught that to them? I think the parents of the WWII generation started it with Social Security, TVA, and other government programs of FDR, then continued on with that socialist idea with the LBJ "Great Society".


22 posted on 06/27/2005 7:23:11 AM PDT by Mr. Nobody
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator

Your #6 - Dead on. I preach those exact concepts all the time.


23 posted on 06/27/2005 7:23:44 AM PDT by Mr. Nobody
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: soundandvision
In fact, if anything I think as the youngest generation grows into its 30's and 40's it's learning that it will have to adapt and change to stay in the work force.

It's going to learn that by the age of 40, you had better have your own company.

24 posted on 06/27/2005 7:26:58 AM PDT by dfwgator (Congratulations Longhorns.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
Count me as another post-Boomer who doesn't want to hear ANY Baby Boomer lecture me on ANYTHING to do with personal responsibility, career choices, or any other topic that grownups talk about.

I've been cleaning up after Boomers my entire life, and frankly, I'm sick of them. Yes, there are some decent Boomers, but for the most part, their generation has been an absolute pox on the Republic.
25 posted on 06/27/2005 7:31:28 AM PDT by horse_doc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
It's going to learn that by the age of 40, you had better have your own company.

Well, that's largely impractical for most of us that don't have the capital to do so. Those that do I applaud their vision and bravery -- I don't have that.

26 posted on 06/27/2005 7:32:15 AM PDT by soundandvision
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

Okay you young people out there. What are your thoughts on investment accounts for younger workers as a part of saving Social Security. Like it, hate it, no use for it?


27 posted on 06/27/2005 7:34:13 AM PDT by maxter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: theDentist

Many are not, such as myself.

I love that Baby Boomers, the most spoiled and entitled generation in the history of Western Civ, could possibly try to pass judgement on other generations with a collective straight face.


28 posted on 06/27/2005 7:36:59 AM PDT by vikk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: vikk
my apologies Vikk. I should have noted that many GenX'ers are waking up and taking their lives into their own hands. I bet most of those are FReepers.

mea culpa

29 posted on 06/27/2005 7:52:23 AM PDT by theDentist (The Dems have put all their eggs in one basket-case: Howard "Belltower" Dean.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: thoughtomator

"The real "Entitlement Generation" is the baby boomers, who clearly have no problem with feeling entitled to spend both their parents' and childrens' wealth, while assuming no responsibility whatsoever to pull the apple cart off the train tracks."

Right, Power to the People dude, don't trust anyone over 25.


30 posted on 06/27/2005 8:14:20 AM PDT by dljordan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: dljordan

You tell me, mate. Baby boomers feel entitled to Social Security as-is, despite the certain knowledge that following generations not only won't get the same deal, but also that those same younger folks are being taxed for it on a blatantly fraudulent basis.


31 posted on 06/27/2005 8:27:00 AM PDT by thoughtomator (The U.S. Constitution poses no serious threat to our form of government)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: maxter

Why would anyone want to save that socialist Ponzy scheme?

I have had enough of the nanny police state that our country has become. I would say Jefferson is spinning in his grave, but at this point, if he was connected to a generator, he could personally supply half of Virginias electrical demand.

Let stop working to "preserve" the very socialist programs which have eroded this country in the first place.

End it, don't mend it.


32 posted on 06/27/2005 8:34:44 AM PDT by edeal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: horse_doc
I worked for a couple of boomers especially the liberal/ex-hippie and they are the biggest jerks. When it comes down to taking time off such as vacation, they don't like it even though they take time off themselves.

One boomer I worked for insisted that I show loyalty, etc. ad nauseam but when it was time for layoffs, my name was at the top of the list. This is one of my reasons of my jaundiced view towards "corporate life". That manager also insisted we put in 10 hour days including Friday and we were expected to come in some on weekends. Of course, he put in short hours. I see him walk in about 9:30 am and be out the door at 2:30pm just about everyday with his gym bag. He basically worked 20 hours every week. He also implemented late afternoon mandatory meetings everyday starting at 4:00 pm with his leads just to keep us at work until 6:00 pm. The meetings were worthless and of course, he wasn't there.

Count me as another post-Boomer who doesn't want to hear ANY Baby Boomer lecture me on ANYTHING to do with personal responsibility, career choices, or any other topic that grownups talk about.

I've been cleaning up after Boomers my entire life, and frankly, I'm sick of them. Yes, there are some decent Boomers, but for the most part, their generation has been an absolute pox on the Republic.

33 posted on 06/27/2005 8:39:53 AM PDT by CORedneck
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: WomanBiologist
Or maybe some of the so-called "entitlement generation" are just not going to take the same crap that our parents took.

Ding! Ding! Ding! We have a winner!

I saw my Dad get laid-off one year shy of being eligible for a (reduced) company pension. I've worked for companies that make incredible demands on their employee's personal time and try to sell it as a "Team Effort." Yet when the department manager is told from on high to reduce his department head count by 10%, they let people go with nary a thought.

The company isn't your friend, your family, or your life. Do a honest day's work, then go home to your loved ones.

34 posted on 06/27/2005 8:41:47 AM PDT by whd23
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: maxter

We won't see a dime of SS. The majority of the gen X gen Y population won't see a better standard of living than their parents. As stated, we are free agents increasingly competing against the global gen x gen y population, with a continuously lowering pay scale due to labor supply and demand scales moving closer to perfectly fluid.

We've got fewer options, extended studies until we have a post Masters degree while working, or moving into a field where distance to customers negates offshoring. Either climb the (ever smaller percentage wise of total workforce) corporate ladder, get a government job, or learn a trade and field and start a business by 40.

What really pisses off Gen X people are the trade deficits, and the fact that baby boomers and our grandparents generation are racking up trillion dollar debts that we will have to pay off, plus interest, from our paychecks, every paycheck, for the rest of our lives, AND OUR CHILDRENS' LIVES.

The boomers and their parents have entitled themselves to the highest level of economic prosperity the world have ever seen by bankrupting their nation and enslaving their descendants to debt obligations.

Entitled, my ass, the tax burden on our generation is going to be staggering, and the beneficiaries of the government largess will be boomers and foreign creditors.

There have been several studies that predict the US taxpayer will soon be paying well over 66% of income to taxes. To pay off the debts of previous generations.


35 posted on 06/27/2005 8:43:21 AM PDT by JerseyHighlander
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: qam1

Gen X ping.


36 posted on 06/27/2005 8:46:53 AM PDT by JerseyHighlander
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: edeal
"End it, don't mend it.

Realistically though, you have to mend it to end it. Just can't take it away cold turkey. Nothing in govt happens that way. I agree with your basic point however.

37 posted on 06/27/2005 9:07:41 AM PDT by maxter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: JerseyHighlander

Then you guys need to get into the political process, make your voices heard and demand what you want. Only those who are loud get heard. So speak up. Tell the powerful what you want and back it up with your collective votes. There is still hope and there are older people working for the same thing you want. Debt paydown, etc. It is not one generation against another although there are a lot of jerks all around.


38 posted on 06/27/2005 9:13:58 AM PDT by maxter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: maxter

End it by doing whatever one has to so that it is gone at some point in the future. Our politicians do not want it to ever go away. They think they have a right to direct our retirement.


39 posted on 06/27/2005 9:22:45 AM PDT by edeal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: edeal

That is why investment accounts are a good first step. You see then the money that goes into that account is yours, not the govt to take away. You can leave it to your kids. Help spread the word. It is a small start but the President is trying to help you guys. Get behind him and push for something better. The elderly vote in record numbers. Younger people do not vote. Change that and you will see results. I have great hope from your passion and I urge you to contact your Congressman and have your friends do the same. Let them hear from you. You can change things.


40 posted on 06/27/2005 9:30:43 AM PDT by maxter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: dfwgator
The bottom line is, we are all free agents, whether we like it or not, and you better be prepared to continually sell yourself to many different companies over the span of your career.

Darn right. Loyalty is a two way street.

41 posted on 06/27/2005 9:32:16 AM PDT by NittanyLion
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell
Sorry, I don't buy that.

What you are not seeing is this: we won't be stepped on like our parents for our loyalty. If you treat us without the respect we feel we've earned, we'll go somewhere where our @$$ busting efforts will be appreciated. Respect is a two way street. Loyalty is not to be taken advantage of.

42 posted on 06/27/2005 9:50:38 AM PDT by Maigrey (TC, Kick that cancer in the @$$ - Texas Termite (shame on you with such language!))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: maxter
My view: I'm paying in 7% of my income to something I won't see - ever. The system will collapse ~ the time I'm 50. So, I will have paid in over $100,000 and won't have a tax break for it.

I'd rather have the 7% and let me invest it for myself - risks and all.

43 posted on 06/27/2005 10:01:03 AM PDT by Maigrey (TC, Kick that cancer in the @$$ - Texas Termite (shame on you with such language!))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell

Okay, so according to your logic if all young people joined the armed forces the entitlement mentality would not exist among them.

And where do you think that'd leave the private sector of our economy in a few years, especially when the baby boomers join their parents "collecting" SS and Medicare off the backs of their own children and grandchildren?

Greedy geezers should STHU when it comes to any discussion of "entitlement mentality".


44 posted on 06/27/2005 10:02:53 AM PDT by k2blader (Was it wrong to kill Terri Shiavo? YES - 83.8%. FR Opinion Poll.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Maigrey

See post 40.


45 posted on 06/27/2005 10:06:24 AM PDT by maxter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: whd23
I saw my Dad get laid-off one year shy of being eligible for a (reduced) company pension.

My Dad was laid off six months shy of being eligible for a company pension. This was back in the era when it took ten years to become vested in a company's pension plan. The bast**rds laid off my Dad after nine years, six months of service.

He filed a claim with the EEOC, but he lost at the hearing. The company claimed that they weren't just laying off "older workers", they were laying people off by projects. Those that worked for certain projects were eliminated, people of all ages.

Of course, if they wanted to get rid of someone, they banded them together in "Project ZZZ" and then that was their justification for a job massacre.

Young people, don't trust the big corporations. They'll use you up and spit you out. Wait till someone younger wants your job. Or someone's relatives. You may think you're riding high now. Wait till it comes your time to get knocked off the chart.

46 posted on 06/27/2005 10:33:35 AM PDT by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

Exactly. That is why you always need a backup plan. Have some contacts so you can get another job quickly if you lose one.


47 posted on 06/27/2005 10:40:14 AM PDT by rwfromkansas (http://www.xanga.com/home.aspx?user=rwfromkansas)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Maigrey
I'm paying in 7% of my income to something I won't see - ever.

You're paying 15.3%, the same as any self-employed person. On paper, your employer might be paying 7.65%, but that 7.65% is either cut from your potential pay or an increase in customers' prices (and the employer has more control over wages than over market prices).

Don't worry about your retirement years. When the boomers (regretfully, my generation) are finished destroying our economy, our freedom, and our culture, there won't be anything in this country left to retire from, or retire to.

48 posted on 06/27/2005 10:46:30 AM PDT by meadsjn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: thoughtomator

"Baby boomers feel entitled to Social Security as-is, despite the certain knowledge that following generations not only won't get the same deal, but also that those same younger folks are being taxed for it on a blatantly fraudulent basis."

It's not very thoughtful of you to paint an entire group of millions with one brush. I'm 55 years old and have been working since I was 16 years old. I don't think I will ever get back what I paid in to SS. So who gets it? I would have been entirely happy not to participate in the Ponzi scheme. I didn't create SS and no one in my generation did.

I think you're just angry and want to blame someone.


49 posted on 06/27/2005 10:47:17 AM PDT by dljordan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: GPBurdell; qam1

The socialist geezers have no room to talk.


50 posted on 06/27/2005 10:48:32 AM PDT by NeoCaveman (Where government moves in, community retreats, civil society disintegrates - Jancie Rogers Brown)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-107 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson