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Skipping school can mean a day in court or washing school buses, fines or parenting classes
Houston Chronicle ^ | July 5, 2005 | BILL MURPHY

Posted on 07/05/2005 12:51:18 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

Bill and Rebecca Hardin sat in a Cypresswood court recently, waiting to find out whether they would be fined as much as $500 each because their son was allegedly truant from school.

On the same day, a 17-year-old Spring High student was hauled off to the county jail for at least a day for failing to honor a contractual promise to attend school.

And some students who played hooky during the school year are spending days of summer vacation washing school buses under court order.

The youths and their parents have been landing before judges as part of an anti-truancy program run by the Harris County District Attorney's Office in four justice of the peace courts. The program relies on early intervention, tough love and scaring-families-straight techniques.

After a student has three unexcused absences, the district attorney's office sends a letter warning the child and parents that they will face criminal charges and fines up to $500 each if the child has three more unexcused absences.

During the past two school years, the district attorney's office has sent out more than 15,800 warning letters to parents and children in nine area school districts.

If the warning goes unheeded, another is sent notifying the student that he or she has been charged with truancy and the parents that they have been charged with contributing to non-attendance at school, both Class C misdemeanors.

School officials say anecdotal evidence and limited early statistics indicate that the program is working. Prosecutors can get the attention of kids and parents when school officials can't, said Juan Lumbreras, attendance specialist for the southeast region of the Houston Independent School District.

"The program's been real positive. It helps make students and parents aware," he said. "We get tired of repeating ourselves."

'Been very successful' The district attorney's office runs the program in JP courts in Pasadena, Clear Lake, Sagemont in southeast Houston and on Cypresswood in northwest Harris County.

School districts participating are Pasadena, Clear Creek, Waller, Tomball, Spring, Aldine and La Porte. HISD's southeast region, which includes Milby and Chavez high schools, and part of the Cy-Fair district also participate.

"It's a great program. The whole idea is to expedite the process and get the kids back in school," said County Judge Robert Eckels. "It's been very successful in changing the habits of kids heading down the path of truancy."

In the past, schools would send out letters or make calls to homes about a child's non-attendance. Typically, only after a student had accrued dozens of absences would a prosecutor become involved and bring a charge.

"You'd see a case in April for 45 absences in fall semester," said Bill Hawkins, chief of the district attorney's juvenile division. By then, he said, it might be too late for the student to salvage anything from the school year.

During the school year that just ended, the district attorney's office sent out 11,910 letters to parents whose children had three unexcused absences.

Hawkins said that only 20 percent of the students who received warning letters cut school three more times.

Parents of those who do face a shock.

Bill Hardin was stunned when he received a letter informing him that he had been charged.

"At first, I couldn't believe it," said Hardin after a hearing on the family's cases in June. "They said I was contributing to the delinquency of a minor. But I was sending him to school."

Hardin said his son earns good grades at Spring High, but had skipped school several times to go fishing.

Parents are responsible Some parents said it is unfair of judges to hold parents accountable for making sure wayward, disobedient children don't skip classes.

Ernest Townsel said his ex-wife, Vonda Hill, tries to make sure their daughter, 16, goes to Westfield High, and their daughter, whose truancy case has landed before Judge J. Kent Adams, assures them that she is attending.

Hill is a busy single mother who has to rely on what her daughter tells her, Townsel said in an interview, and the daughter isn't always truthful about her attendance.

He asked the judge to give his daughter the shock treatment of a day in jail, but the judge declined, instead fining Hill $200.

Court officials argue that however difficult, parents are responsible for their minor children. Even after truancy charges are filed, prosecutors work to avoid trials and criminal convictions.

When youths and parents arrive at court, prosecutors try to convince them to agree to a contract stipulating that the students will attend class for six months without any unexcused absences.

Prosecutors coordinate with social workers and counselors to address family, economic or substance abuse problems that may cause a student to play hooky. A condition that a student attend counseling often is added to a contract.

The contracts usually require students to perform community service. At the Cypresswood court, Adams' concept of community service is hardly undemanding: about 20 to 40 hours cleaning school buses.

Parents often are required to take parenting classes.

Sent to lockup By signing the contract, students admit that they were criminally truant and parents admit that they contributed to their child's non-attendance. But the charges are dismissed if the child and parents fulfill the contract's conditions.

Judges can be tough on those who do not comply with contracts. Students who continue to skip school are brought into court on contempt charges. Brought in a second time, some judges send them to lockups.

In February, a 17-year-old girl from Spring High was brought into court after missing school 26 times, Assistant District Attorney Michael Moore said. She signed a contract saying she would not miss school during the next six months, but skipped school 38 more times.

At a recent hearing in Cypresswood, Adams found her in contempt of court for failing to live up to the contract.

He fined her $505. When she said she didn't have the money, she was handcuffed and taken to adult jail as other youths looked on.

Her mother, in court on a contempt charge for failing to see that her daughter abided by the contract, also was fined $505.

"Isn't this about the most ridiculous thing you have heard — we have to put your child in jail for failure to go to school?" Adams said.

Those under age 17 are sent to the county juvenile detention center — the fate of 40 youths so far this year, Hawkins said.

When youths age 17 and 18 are found in contempt and cannot pay the $500 fines often imposed on them, they are sent to the county jails for adults for a day or two. No statistics were available on how many were sent to adult jails.

The district attorney's office has decided to be tough on truancy because it is a "gateway" activity that can lead to drug use, minor crimes and, ultimately, more serious crimes, Hawkins said.

Adams said he supports the program because youths who don't finish high school face diminished prospects.

Other areas are running similar programs. In Forth Worth, a municipal court has been set aside to hear only truancy cases.

The Fort Worth program, like the one in Harris County, emphasizes quick intervention and the potential imposition of fines.

The program has helped push average daily attendance in the Forth Worth Independent School District, which serves about 80,000 students, from 93.8 percent in 2002-2003 to 94.9 percent this school year, said Delena Doyle, the district's assistant director of student affairs.

Affects bottom line Such an increase means more money in a school district's coffers. State aid to schools is based in part on average daily attendance. Fort Worth's 1 percent increase in average daily attendance brought $4 million more to the district this year, Doyle said.

In Harris County, the ability of the district attorney's program to increase state aid hasn't gone unnoticed by some local school districts, said Moore, one of two prosecutors assigned to the program.

"The school districts talk a lot about the average daily attendance money," he said.

bill.murphy@chron.com


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: education; educationnews; publicschools; sudents; truancy
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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***... The program relies on early intervention, tough love and scaring-families-straight techniques. ...***

***...During the past two school years, the district attorney's office has sent out more than 15,800 warning letters to parents and children in nine area school districts. ...***

***..."The program's been real positive. It helps make students and parents aware," he said. "We get tired of repeating ourselves." ...***

________________________________________________________________

I dare say, it's been "successful" keeping kids in public classrooms so as not to lose public money. Here we have another category to add to the education budget.

I must ask, if it's this hard keeping kids in public schools, perhaps the taxpayer should ask, "Why?"

1 posted on 07/05/2005 12:51:19 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

"During the past two school years, the district attorney's office has sent out more than 15,800 warning letters to parents and children in nine area school districts"

And most of the parents receiving those letters couldn't care less


2 posted on 07/05/2005 12:54:46 AM PDT by commonasdirt (Reading DU so you won't hafta)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Now The State is telling parents how to parent. All in the name of "saving tax money".

I got an idea--how about cutting taxes and saving it that way, and not increasing the amount of interference in people's lives? If their kids aren't attending or misbehave, out they go. But who gives the state the right to punish people for not being "good parents"? Who defines this?

3 posted on 07/05/2005 12:54:49 AM PDT by Darkwolf377 (6/30/05 budget deficit down http://www.csmonitor.com/2005/0620/p17s01-cogn.html)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I thought school was only mandatory thru the 9th grade.


4 posted on 07/05/2005 12:55:40 AM PDT by taxesareforever (Government is running amuck)
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To: Darkwolf377

Fines, jail time, parenting classes, community service, etc.....

There is something very wrong with this picture.


5 posted on 07/05/2005 12:57:16 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: commonasdirt

***....15,800 warning letters....***

Since multiple letters go out to individual families, I'd like to know how many people we're really talking about.


6 posted on 07/05/2005 12:59:36 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Gotta keep the body count up so the funding comes in--or derive it from court-imposed fines....

Notice no mention was made of grades or course material mastery, only attendance. I wonder how many were bored stiff?

7 posted on 07/05/2005 1:00:28 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (Grant no power to government you would not want your worst enemies to wield against you.)
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To: Born Conservative

ping


8 posted on 07/05/2005 1:00:44 AM PDT by kenth
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To: taxesareforever
Compulsory Attendance Laws Listed by State

Texas: Legal drop out age - 18

9 posted on 07/05/2005 1:03:35 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Darkwolf377
"Parenting classes" usually are handled by the Social Services. I don't know about these other jurisdictions, but from what I have heard here, they bill the parents for the classes and the cost can run into 4 figures.

The one person I talked with was pretty agravated, partly because they were told they had to take the course, partly because of the expense, and partly because the one "teaching" parenting had never been married and had no children.

10 posted on 07/05/2005 1:05:08 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (Grant no power to government you would not want your worst enemies to wield against you.)
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To: Smokin' Joe
Gotta keep the body count up so the funding comes in--or derive it from court-imposed fines....

Yes. Follow the money - $700 BILLION per year from all sources. 50% to 50%+ of all states' budgets are fed into public education.

Notice no mention was made of grades or course material mastery, only attendance. I wonder how many were bored stiff?

Bump!

11 posted on 07/05/2005 1:05:47 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: commonasdirt

And most of the parents receiving those letters couldn't care less.

You do have that right.


12 posted on 07/05/2005 1:09:36 AM PDT by moog
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To: Smokin' Joe
The one person I talked with was pretty agravated, partly because they were told they had to take the course, partly because of the expense, and partly because the one "teaching" parenting had never been married and had no children.

The last part would make me aggravated. On the other hand, if I would have ever skipped, my hide would have been tanned red and my mom and dad would have marched me right back to school. There wouldn't have to be any "parenting classes" for them.

13 posted on 07/05/2005 1:14:05 AM PDT by moog
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Gotta keep the body count up so the funding comes in--or derive it from court-imposed fines....

Actually, through no child's behind left law, the attendance has to be 95% or your school can be labelled.

14 posted on 07/05/2005 1:15:48 AM PDT by moog
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To: Darkwolf377
If their kids aren't attending or misbehave, out they go.

If only it were that easy:)

15 posted on 07/05/2005 1:17:39 AM PDT by moog
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To: moog
Help me here moog.

It almost seems they're harsher on truants than they are on those who are disruptive.
16 posted on 07/05/2005 1:20:31 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: All
***.......national statistics of school crime, say experts, seem to indicate that more schools should qualify for the classification. In 2000, 72 of every 1,000 students ages 12 through 18 reported being victims of crimes at school. The average far exceeds most states' requirements for a dangerous school.

At the heart of the discrepancy may well be a reluctance on the part of educators to report campus crime fully. A survey by the National Association of School Resource Officers found that 89 percent of school police believe crime is already underreported. "It's the scarlet letter in education today," says Mr. Trump. "Administrators have said to me privately that they would rather be academically failing than be a dangerous school." ....*** http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/967058/posts

17 posted on 07/05/2005 1:23:11 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: moog
The only time I got in trouble for skipping school, (when I actually hadn't) was in the sixth grade. I was a frequent, if not quite daily 'visitor' to the principal's office, and had decided to clean up my act.

After a week of not getting into any trouble, the principal assumed I had been absent, called my folks (Mom) on Friday afternoon and told them he hoped I was feeling better.

I spent the whole weekend in trouble (seriously grounded) until the whole mess could be sorted out on Monday...After that, I resolved to maintain a higher profile...and returned to my miscreant ways.

18 posted on 07/05/2005 1:28:53 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (Grant no power to government you would not want your worst enemies to wield against you.)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
There is something very wrong with this picture. yes and no. Yes, some schools can get obsessive about it. It's a mixed bag. I had a student whose story was not about truancy, but something like this: They are on vacation for the first 13 days of school. The daughter has a hard time leaving mom--scratch another 3 days. Mom and Dad split up. The girls shuffle back and forth between Mom and Dad. Mom goes to Arizona and takes the girls. The girl is gone for another two weeks. The mom gets put in jail on an outstanding warrant for a month. The kids go to live with Grandma. Then Mom comes back. They get evicted from their house. Mom and boyfriend move in together. The girls go back to Dad. Boyfriend gets Mom pregnant. Boyfriend moves out. Mom gets evicted a second time. And it went on from there. The girl was one of my best behaved ones. She missed well over 60 days that year and it was only some miracle of God that year that she got to grade level in everything. There are multiple factors to consider including the school, parents, and the personal responsibility of the student (the last being rare for any person it seems like nowadays). The last factor did not apply in my case. All we could do was send notes and they were ignored. Believe me, I tried my best to make sure she was caught up, making several trips to their house(s) to see what was going on. I actually did like the mom a lot, but the situation about drove me crazy.

I had students miss for vacation, to go to amusement parkds, to go see movies, to go to ballgames, to go visit cousins, to clean the house, etc. last year. I am very tolerant of family situations (though I can only recall twice during my school career of missing for something like that) and don't mind it at all as a teacher. Sometimes you do have to catch kids up when they've been gone a while. Even during testing week, I was informed by parents that 6 were leaving on vacation that Friday. I had to scramble to get them done by Thursday.

I did have another kid one year whose family took at 3 week vacation, then we had a 3-week break, then she came back for 3 days, then was gone for over 2 more weeks. It took the girl (who had been my best worker before) about another month to get back into the swing of things.

I've gotten more flexible over the years and this year, more than any other, kids were taken on vacations. Usually parents did let me know. I do realize that there are some difficult situations. One mom who is having a difficult pregnancy told me point blank that she jsut didn't feel like getting up and getting her kids ready for school. I understand, coming from a large family.

As far as skipping classes, my dad and mom expected me to have my butt in classes and to make sure that I learned something no matter how boring it was. I did have a few BORING teachers, but I WAS there.

19 posted on 07/05/2005 1:38:36 AM PDT by moog
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To: Smokin' Joe
The only time I got in trouble for skipping school, (when I actually hadn't) was in the sixth grade. I was a frequent, if not quite daily 'visitor' to the principal's office, and had decided to clean up my act. After a week of not getting into any trouble, the principal assumed I had been absent, called my folks (Mom) on Friday afternoon and told them he hoped I was feeling better. I spent the whole weekend in trouble (seriously grounded) until the whole mess could be sorted out on Monday...After that, I resolved to maintain a higher profile...and returned to my miscreant ways.

Now that's funny. If I had been sent to the principal's office once ever, my parents would have meted out punishment that would have never made me get in trouble again.

20 posted on 07/05/2005 1:41:17 AM PDT by moog
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
"It almost seems they're harsher on truants than they are on those who are disruptive."

In some places, probably, in others probably not. In my area, it's those who are disruptive that are punished harsher than those who are truant. I do think that some punishments can be too harsh. I'm not in favor of "parenting classes" at all. There should be something to address personal responsibility for the student though. It is probably best handled by the parents themselves in most situations (I do believe, at least in my area, that that would be the case) or an agreed upon punishment between the school, parents, and kid.

21 posted on 07/05/2005 1:46:17 AM PDT by moog
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To: moog

I hear you.

But it looks like you were doing most of the worrying moog.

If there'd been less intervention on your part, the example of a few could have been an example for all.

You sound like you love your job.


22 posted on 07/05/2005 1:46:38 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: moog
............. There should be something to address personal responsibility for the student though. It is probably best handled by the parents themselves in most situations (I do believe, at least in my area, that that would be the case) or an agreed upon punishment between the school, parents, and kid.

Personal responsibility should be a big part of one's education. And when it doesn't happen, due to parenting or personal irresponsibility, consequences should follow.

But now we have districts who, because THEY ARE LOSING MONEY, are taking families to court and putting people in jail. This is wrongheaded.

The last part of this article:

***...The program has helped push average daily attendance in the Forth Worth Independent School District, which serves about 80,000 students, from 93.8 percent in 2002-2003 to 94.9 percent this school year, said Delena Doyle, the district's assistant director of student affairs.

Affects bottom line

Such an increase means more money in a school district's coffers. State aid to schools is based in part on average daily attendance. Fort Worth's 1 percent increase in average daily attendance brought $4 million more to the district this year, Doyle said.

In Harris County, the ability of the district attorney's program to increase state aid hasn't gone unnoticed by some local school districts, said Moore, one of two prosecutors assigned to the program.

"The school districts talk a lot about the average daily attendance money," he said. ***

23 posted on 07/05/2005 1:56:48 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: moog
I was just one of many.

The most common infraction dealt with hall passes.

The school had used wood blocks with the teacher's name and room number on them for years. It didn't take long for a fresh bunch of rural kids to decide that we had a few scraps of 2 X 4 around and a magic marker... By the end of the year they had nearly a full cord of (counterfeit) hall passes...

That was sixth grade. I had an excellent teacher, but was a pretty rambunctious kid, despite successful efforts to harness a lot of that energy, and was in good company. Both the teacher and principal should have been named as saints, imho, for the way they handled the lot of us.

My folks did actively participate in me getting punished, and I spent a lot of time in trouble.

God bless Mom and Dad for all they put up with. Thanks to them I have turned out pretty well.

BTW, that was one of the best schools I went to (of seven, by the time I graduated High School), and the best public school.

24 posted on 07/05/2005 2:00:22 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (Grant no power to government you would not want your worst enemies to wield against you.)
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To: Abram; Alexander Rubin; AlexandriaDuke; Annie03; Baby Bear; bassmaner; Bernard; BJClinton; ...
Libertarian ping.To be added or removed from my ping list freepmail me or post a message here

So in Texas they force people to go to school until they are 18 at which time they can legally drop out.But if they don't drop out and skip school they go to an adult jail for not attending a childrens school. Makes a hell of a lot of sense o me .Every child that skips government run public school is a hero in my opinion.They need to be encouraged. If they skip enough school they might actually become intelligent.

If the kids get trapped in public school for any lenght of time there is no way they will graduate with the ability to read there diplomas or make change for a dollar if an item costs 1 cent but they will be ble to put a condom on on a banana which doesnt even work anyway.One of my friends got straight a's in his sex ed classes and knew how to put a condom on a banana with the best of them and he did every time he had sex and even after putting a condom on a banana every time without fail before sex he has 4 kids and hes caught three stds the nea is lying to you all codoms dont work

25 posted on 07/05/2005 2:01:10 AM PDT by freepatriot32 (www.lp.org)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
I hear you. But it looks like you were doing most of the worrying moog. If there'd been less intervention on your part, the example of a few could have been an example for all. You sound like you love your job.

Actually, I worry because I care about the kids and because I am accountable for teaching them how to read, write, and do math at least at school. I didn't go excessive on the intervention at all. It showed that parent that I did care if she was at school or not and she did appreciate that as I have found that most do.

As far as an example of a few being an example for many, that already occurs.

I do keep in close contact with most parents and am famous for making deliveries of papers and such every once in a great while. I try not to be too intrusive though and don't tell anyone how to "do their job." One mom thought it was strange that she had gotten 2 calls and had a couple of workbooks dropped off in the first week. She talked to a couple of neighbors and they just laughed. "That's just Mr. _______ showing that he cares about your kid." The parents actually appreciate knowing what's going on in class and how their kids are doing. For me, I've always just thought that was part of teaching.

I do love my job and work my butt off. But I have the most wonderful job a teacher could have. I learn a lot from the parents every year which will help me when I am able to have my own kid someday.

26 posted on 07/05/2005 2:03:52 AM PDT by moog
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Would not be so repellent if the kids concerned were actually being educated in those "public schools".
27 posted on 07/05/2005 2:06:37 AM PDT by Iris7 ("War means fighting, and fighting means killing." - Bedford Forrest)
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To: moog
There was one particularly excellent teacher who stood by me in my "darkest hours". I still pray for his soul today (passed on due to cancer.) Turned my bevahior around and ended up doing pretty darn well. I'm sure there are students out there who pray for you. As representative of one of those students, thanks.
28 posted on 07/05/2005 2:09:19 AM PDT by Caipirabob (Democrats.. Socialists..Commies..Traitors...Who can tell the difference?)
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To: freepatriot32

Bananas don't need a little slack at the end...


29 posted on 07/05/2005 2:10:14 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (Grant no power to government you would not want your worst enemies to wield against you.)
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To: Smokin' Joe
That was sixth grade. I had an excellent teacher, but was a pretty rambunctious kid, despite successful efforts to harness a lot of that energy, and was in good company. Both the teacher and principal should have been named as saints, imho, for the way they handled the lot of us. My folks did actively participate in me getting punished, and I spent a lot of time in trouble. God bless Mom and Dad for all they put up with. Thanks to them I have turned out pretty well. BTW, that was one of the best schools I went to (of seven, by the time I graduated High School), and the best public school. That's how my high school was too. My high school principal was superb. He dealt with the truant situations pretty well (he was a general in the Army reserves). I've never heard an unkind word said about him by anyone who knew him.

Yes, it's those moms and dads that put up with a lot. I know mine did. I was their experiment, being the oldest. I guess they took a while getting it right, because they had seven more:).

It was nice to see that almost every one of my classmates who came to my high school reunion a few years ago had turned out pretty good. It's been good for my mom to see her kids turn out to be "good" too--firm in their faiths, families, and jobs. Pleasing dear old mom is always foremost in our minds.

30 posted on 07/05/2005 2:13:59 AM PDT by moog
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To: Caipirabob
"There was one particularly excellent teacher who stood by me in my "darkest hours". I still pray for his soul today (passed on due to cancer.) Turned my bevahior around and ended up doing pretty darn well. I'm sure there are students out there who pray for you. As representative of one of those students, thanks."

Actually, I think I have a LOT of people praying for me. There's absolutely no reasonable explanation for some of the good things I see happen. It's certainly not me. Sometimes I think it's the prayers of the little ones themselves. This one told his mom, "Mom, it's my turn to pray today, your prayers aren't working." He had been struggling a little in reading. From that day on, he took off. Same with another girl. She was reading well (a fourth grade level), but had stayed there for a little while and was getting frustrated. Her mom said maybe she should pray a little harder. She prayed really hard that night. The next day she tested at a whole grade level higher. The faith of these little ones humbles me.

Thank you for your kind words.

31 posted on 07/05/2005 2:19:27 AM PDT by moog
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
"But now we have districts who, because THEY ARE LOSING MONEY, are taking families to court and putting people in jail. This is wrongheaded."

I can't judge where the personal responsibility and parenting haven't been there always. Plus there are different perspectives. I agree with you here. I haven't seen this type of situation personally though, so I'm not an expert on it.

There is still the no child's behind left act that requires 95% attendance which I think is just as much a force. I seem to recall reading about one school that passed all the academic criteria with flying colors, but had 94.6% attendance and therefore got flagged.

The money situation can mean larger class sizes, cutting teachers, etc. even well after a school year starts at times. We had a teacher that lost her job midyear once and the kids had to be divided up among 3 other classes.

I do pretty much agree with you though.

32 posted on 07/05/2005 2:26:38 AM PDT by moog
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To: moog

We're on the same page moog.

We want children well educated.


33 posted on 07/05/2005 2:32:41 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
We're on the same page moog. We want children well educated.

Amen to that. I always appreciate your perspectives and learn and adapt from them. I'm lucky in that I get to learn a lot from a lot of different people.

34 posted on 07/05/2005 2:37:07 AM PDT by moog
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To: moog

Me too.


35 posted on 07/05/2005 2:38:09 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

:) My turn to smile :)) (I have a double chin)


36 posted on 07/05/2005 2:39:14 AM PDT by moog
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To: moog

Ha! Ha! Ha!


37 posted on 07/05/2005 2:40:01 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: All
Looks like the Family court system. has a new styled money generator.

F-That!

How are two parents working supposed to police Teenagers?
Especially since whooping their BUTT'S lands you in court also?

Do these F-N judges think Everyone is rich accept for them?

AHHH!!!!!!!!

Stop having kids or become MUSLIM! *&%$(&#^$!@(&%_&*@!#

38 posted on 07/05/2005 2:52:03 AM PDT by MaxMax (God Bless America)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

[There is something very wrong with this picture.]


Along with the Supreme Court private property theft decisions and the supression of Christianty and the taking away of freedoms, I'd say we have lost America.


39 posted on 07/05/2005 2:54:03 AM PDT by ohhhh ( Kiss the son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way,when his wrath is kindled...)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I wonder when the masses will notice that their local governments, unable to get tax increases to fly, more and more are turning to the collection of fines to finance ever larger government?


40 posted on 07/05/2005 3:26:04 AM PDT by I_dmc
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To: ohhhh

Yes...I wonder how many of these parents receiving the threatening letters are homeschoolers?


41 posted on 07/05/2005 3:30:12 AM PDT by Pete98 (After his defeat by the Son of God, Satan changed his name to Allah and started over.)
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To: commonasdirt

Sounds like a case of slavery to me...


42 posted on 07/05/2005 3:39:25 AM PDT by tahotdog
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

The sad thing is the kid probably learned more in a day of fishing than he would have in the classroom.


43 posted on 07/05/2005 3:43:54 AM PDT by Fresh Wind (Hello mullah, hello fatah, here I am at camp jihadah...)
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To: moog
As far as skipping classes, my dad and mom expected me to have my butt in classes and to make sure that I learned something no matter how boring it was. I did have a few BORING teachers, but I WAS there.

I'll never forget the day (I was a junior in highschool at the time) I had a 103 degree fever and some idiot from my highschool calls up asking my whereabouts. I explained the situation, and the lady said she wanted to talk to one of my parents. I was totally enraged. I told the lady that both of my parents had honest jobs (unlike herself) which required their presence on worksites and that if SHE would like to have a 103 degree fever she could come over and we'd make passionate love, and she'd probably get one. It's only idiots that you have to talk to like that.

44 posted on 07/05/2005 3:46:44 AM PDT by tahotdog
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Public schools are evil.


45 posted on 07/05/2005 4:28:16 AM PDT by stinkerpot65
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To: kenth; CatoRenasci; Marie; PureSolace; Congressman Billybob; P.O.E.; cupcakes; Amelia; Dianna; ...

Skipping school can also mean jail time for the parents...

46 posted on 07/05/2005 4:33:10 AM PDT by Born Conservative ("If not us, who? And if not now, when? - Ronald Reagan)
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To: Born Conservative

From your LINK.

***....Mr. Ogden died of pulmonary emboli — blood clots in the pulmonary arteries, said Lackawanna County Coroner Joseph Brennan, who ruled the man’s death is not suspicious.

Mr. Ogden had been in Lackawanna County Prison since June 21 on truancy charges, Ms. Ikeler said. ..........***


47 posted on 07/05/2005 4:57:09 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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The truth only comes at the end of the article:

"Such an increase means more money in a school district's coffers. State aid to schools is based in part on average daily attendance. Fort Worth's 1 percent increase in average daily attendance brought $4 million more to the district this year, Doyle said."


48 posted on 07/05/2005 5:10:39 AM PDT by Mortikhi
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To: Mortikhi

Bump!

Follow the $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$.


49 posted on 07/05/2005 5:23:14 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Texas: Legal drop out age - 18

Yup. And our edukashun system is a joke. In 8th grade I took the SAT along with soon-to-be graduates as part of an advanced placement program, scored a 1360. Then took the GED for kicks and giggles, "perfect score". I then spent 4 years, with near-perfect attendance, learning absolutely nothing except how to put a condom on a banana, how bad western Earopeans are and how to roll a joint (extra-curricular, of course).
50 posted on 07/05/2005 6:48:59 AM PDT by BJClinton (I bend the microphone to the furthest point like a Germanic tribesman)
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