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To: Warhammer
The defining legal issue of our generation is not the right to life or even the definition of the family, but whether the United States of America — through its laws, its charters, its magistrates, and its public institutions — can and will meaningfully acknowledge the God of the Bible.[1] The acknowledgment of God is the first principle of liberty, a fact which was recognized by the Founding Fathers who declared that “we are endowed by our Creator with certain inalienable rights.”[2]
The short answer is that leaders may, acting as individuals, freely profess any and all religious beliefs, or none at all. This is protected in Article VI of the Constitution, which states that "no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States."

Additionally, the First Amendment forbids Establishment of a state religion. Clearly this forbids the government from taking a position on whether or not the Bible was divinely inspired.

Note that despite the Declaration's references to a Creator, the Constitution is silent on the issue. Save the ambiguous matter of the date, there is no reference to the Bible or to any Deity or other divine figure.

-Eric

2 posted on 07/11/2005 9:49:30 AM PDT by E Rocc (Anyone who thinks Bush-bashing is banned on FR has never read a Middle East thread >:))
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To: E Rocc
Additionally, the First Amendment forbids Establishment of a state religion. Clearly this forbids the government from taking a position on whether or not the Bible was divinely inspired.

You are absiolutely correct. Men may have opinions on the divinity of the Bible or the truth of any of its tenets, but the government must remain apart from such concerns. Its concern is the worldly sphere, rhetorical flourishes aside.

Men may have any faith they chose, the government may not prefer any one.

6 posted on 07/11/2005 10:32:40 AM PDT by highball ("I find that the harder I work, the more luck I seem to have." -- Thomas Jefferson)
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To: E Rocc
"Additionally, the First Amendment forbids Establishment of a state religion. Clearly this forbids the government from taking a position on whether or not the Bible was divinely inspired."

The Constitutional forbidding of CONGRESS (AND ONLY CONGRESS) to make any law (i.e. pass legislation) regarding the establishment of a religion was written so clearly and concisely that to glean from it that it would be illegal for a Court to display the Ten Commandments, or for a President to simply make reference to his fiath from the bully pulpit, or for a Supreme Court Justice to make legal decisions based primarily on his knowledge of law, but filtered through the same Christian morals and principles of the men who wrote those laws, is a vile and slanderous assertion.

The Founding Fathers were men, by-and-large, who beleived human laws originated from the Ten Commandments, (that is what was taught in law schools and universities of the times...and is still taught today). Though some of the Fathers adhered to no specific Christian denomination, virtually all of these men's hearts were steeped in Christian morals and principles, as their writings so often reveal. They were men whose minds were educated in Christian Universities such as Harvard, Princeton, and men whose faith was tested in the crucible of religious oppression in their country of origin. To assert these men would cringe at seeing the Ten Commandments in a Courtroom or City Hall, or would wince at seeing a Bible in a public classroom, or would rail over testing the legitimacy of abortion by applying it against Christian morals and values, is not only a vile stretch of the imagination, but a brazen slander of these men, and a dispicable revison of history.

All any honest man has to know about religion and the Constitution is that its authors and their successors in government office for the next 200 years frequently made public statements combining religion and government principles, they PROUDLY hung the Ten Commandment is Courts, City Halls, Public libraries and other government buildings from coast to coast.

The 1st Contintental Congress declared a "national day of prayer", and government gave SPECIAL STATUS to Churches by granting them immunity from taxes. President Truman, on a national radio address declared America to be "a Christian nation".

You tried to separate the Declaration of Independence from the Constitution, but you can't succeed in this treacherous endeavor. The good folks who constructed and signed both documents were one and the same men. Naturally, since they understood they were constructing a government, not a Church, they framed the Constitution in legal/secular terms. But their faith and the principles that guided and inspired them in their construction of the Constitution were forever imortalized on that great document, the Declaration of Independence. It tells us who they were, what they believed, what they fought for, what they wanted for their children and the country they founded.

That Christianity and the Christian God were often spoken about and written about by elected government officials, and public buildings were commonly adorned with Christian icons and references for about 200 straight years (before the atheists, anti-Christians and secularists began to revolt against our traditional way of life), is all the evidence any (honest) American really needs.

But alas, since government has been steadily abolishing Christianity from the eyes and ears of the public, honesty and personal integrity have been steadily burried along with God. ("but fear not, for He has risen", ---- and He will rise again).

(1). "To advance Learning and perpetuate it to Posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate Ministry to the Churches." - Harvard
""Dei sub numine viget" (Under God's light she flourishes)"-Princeton

7 posted on 07/11/2005 11:28:42 AM PDT by TheCrusader (("the frenzy of the Mohammedans has devastated the churches of God" Pope Urban II)
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To: E Rocc
The short answer is that leaders may, acting as individuals, freely profess any and all religious beliefs, or none at all. This is protected in Article VI of the Constitution, which states that "no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States."

Huh? What is protected? Just because there can be no religious test, does not mean they have to check their religion at the door. You have a very extreme and misguided interpretation of that.

13 posted on 07/11/2005 1:26:32 PM PDT by Always Right
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To: E Rocc

It is funny how our founding fathers always said prayers before meeting and made numerous reference to God and even Christ in official speeches, but the intellectuals of today seem to think the Founders really did not know what they were doing since what they were doing was unConstitutional by the very same Constitution the Founders wrote.


14 posted on 07/11/2005 1:29:24 PM PDT by Always Right
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To: E Rocc
Additionally, the First Amendment forbids Establishment of a state religion. Clearly this forbids the government from taking a position on whether or not the Bible was divinely inspired.

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;

As long as no law is made that leads to the government taking a position on whether or not the Bible was divinely inspired, then the First Amendment isn't being violated.

60 posted on 07/12/2005 1:57:28 PM PDT by judgeandjury
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